Missouri State University Capital Priorities

Center for Transformational Education for Life, Physical and Health Sciences

In the last 50 years, MSU’s enrollment in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields — known as STEM — has grown from 1,000 to 2,400. Graduate enrollment in STEM programs has doubled in the last 25 years.

Despite enrollment and research growth, the university’s STEM facilities have remained mostly unaltered for decades. These facilities no longer meet modern scientific and technological needs for workforce training, education and research.

MSU proposes to expand and renovate STEM academic buildings on campus. This would establish the Center for Transformational Education for Life, Physical and Health Sciences.

These facilities will house the university’s biology, chemistry, health, geography, geology, planning, mathematics and computer science departments. Students who graduate from these programs pursue careers in health care, biochemistry, pharmacology, immunology, statistics, software development, data analytics, math education, information security and other STEM fields. Research conducted at MSU in these fields includes immune system response to respiratory infections, pulsating stars, extrasolar planets, crystal engineering, pattern recognition and machine learning, microarray data analysis, damaged DNA, congenital heart and vascular defects, chemotherapeutic agents and cancer cells, and bioanalytical chemistry.

Facility space and outdated laboratories currently limit the ability of these programs to grow enrollment and meet market needs.

The total cost for this project is between $60 million and $100 million. MSU proposes to fund the project with a combination of federal and state appropriations, donor contributions and institutional funds.

Model of envisioned Temple Hall

Our vision for current STEM facility Temple Hall

Temple Hall was built in 1971 and has not been substantially remodeled since it was constructed.

Approximately 1,100 students each year major in biology, chemistry and geography, geology and planning — the academic departments housed in Temple Hall. More than 9,000 students take labs, organic chemistry, or first-year science courses in the facility. MSU proposes to construct a 66,500-square-foot addition and renovate existing space. This will transform and modernize the facility.

Model of envisioned Cheek Hall

Our vision for current STEM facility Cheek Hall

Cheek Hall was constructed in 1955. The building was renovated piecemeal in the 1980s, and it has not been substantially remodeled since that time.

Approximately 600 students each year major in computer science and mathematics — the academic departments housed in Cheek Hall. More than 3,500 students take math and other general education classes in Cheek each year. MSU proposes to construct a 32,000-square-foot addition and renovate existing spaces. This will transform and modernize the facility.

Renovation of Ann Kampeter Health Sciences Hall

architectural rendering of the Ann Kampeter Health Sciences Hall.

Architectural rendering of Ann Kampeter Health Sciences Hall foyer.Architectural rendering of Ann Kampeter Health Sciences Hall lobby.

Missouri State University’s enrollment in health-related fields has increased dramatically, growing to more than 4,400 students this fall.

The Ann Kampeter Health Sciences Hall (previously named the Professional Building) once housed all of MSU’s health programs. It continues to house biomedical sciences, nursing, sports medicine, and communication sciences and disorders.

As the university’s health programs grew, many were relocated to new facilities, leaving Kampeter Hall outdated and ill-equipped to meet modern teaching and research needs. MSU has developed a plan to renovate this building. The project will repurpose areas left behind as departments moved to other campus facilities. It will also allow for reorganization and continued growth in the university’s health programs.

Vacated space will be converted into research space and appropriately sized classrooms equipped with updated technology. The Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic will be updated and new advisement and student collaboration spaces will be created. The building’s emergency generator will be replaced and repairs will be made to the roof, exterior envelope, boilers and fire-alarm system.

Private donations totaling $2 million have been contributed to fund half of the project cost. The university requests that the state appropriate funds for the remaining $2 million.

Darr College of Agriculture expansion

Missouri State University’s William H. Darr College of Agriculture is one of the largest non-land-grant agriculture schools in the nation.

The college stands ready to meet the workforce needs of Missouri’s $88 billion agriculture industry. To meet these needs, MSU has developed a plan to expand its agriculture facilities and programs.

The university plans to construct a building to house a Springfield Public Schools K-12 agricultural magnet school at the Darr Agricultural Center.

MSU also plans to construct a small animal education facility to complement its plant and large animal facilities located on the university’s seven working farms.

Private donations of $3 million have been contributed to fund half of the project cost. The university requests that the state appropriate funds for the remaining $3 million.