Mental Health and Behavioral Sciences Courses

Counseling (COU) courses

  • COU 700 Problems in Counseling

    admission to Counseling Program or permission.

    Individual investigation into a problem or problems of concern to the student and deemed of significance by the instructor. Written report required. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Fall, Spring
  • COU 701 Assessment and Testing for Counselors

    admission to Counseling Program or permission.

    A comprehensive study of instruments for measuring psychological traits, including group devices suitable for use in elementary and secondary schools, as well as individual instruments for use in both school and community agency settings. Basic statistical concepts and common terminology related to measurement are taught as a functional part of the course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 702 School Counseling Foundations and Ethics

    admission to Counseling Program or permission.

    Philosophy, organization, and practices of a counseling program in the elementary and secondary school. The school counselor's role as counselor, consultant, and coordinator, professional identity, and legal issues are included. Includes a significant focus on ethical standards and issues.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 703 Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice in School and Mental Health Counseling

    admission to Counseling Program or permission.

    An introduction and overview of the history, philosophy, and function of the counselor in elementary schools, secondary schools, clinical mental health settings, and other community agency settings. Includes an examination of service population characteristics and treatment needs, intervention modalities and approaches, professional identity, and related topics with a significant focus on ethical standards and issues. School counselors' various roles as counselor, consultant, and coordinator, professional identity, and legal issues are also included.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 704 Introduction to School Counseling

    admission to Counseling Program or permission.

    An introduction and overview of the foundational aspects of school counseling with a focus on the development, implementation, and evaluation of a comprehensive school counseling program in elementary and secondary schools (K-12). Includes an exploration of the leadership role of school counselors within the school setting at the elementary and secondary level (K-12).

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • COU 705 Orientation to Personal and Professional Development in Mental Health and School Counseling

    admission to Counseling Program or permission.

    This course is an experience in personal and group encountering and sensitivity. Its purpose is to assist students in discovering a more complete awareness, understanding, and acceptance of themselves and others as human beings. Primary emphasis will be upon students exploring self, values, needs, and personal characteristics. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    11Upon demand
  • COU 706 Introduction to TeleMental Health in Counseling

    This course is designed to increase knowledge and skills of counselors regarding the ethics, research, and practice associated with telemental health. Students will learn presentation skills, HIPAA compliance, best practices, crisis planning, use of technology, orienting clients, settings, and care coordination.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • COU 707 Human Growth and Development

    admission to Counseling Program or permission.

    Study of child, adolescent and adult psychological development theories, normal adjustment processes, personality structure, and abnormal behavior.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 708 Play Therapy and Child Counseling Techniques

    admission to a Counseling program or certificate; and COU 702 or COU 703; and COU 705; and COU 710 and COU 711 or concurrently enrollment in COU 710 and COU 711; or permission of school director.

    A consideration of counseling with elementary school-aged children. Emphasis is placed upon play therapy and the counseling process as it affects the educational, personal, familial, and social adjustment of children.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 709 Introduction to Mental Health Counseling

    admission to Counseling Program or permission.

    This is an introductory survey course which introduces counseling students to the fundamentals of mental health counseling. Topics covered include the organization of mental health structures in the public domain, including funding mechanisms, licensing issues and processes, pertinent professional organizations, and emerging trends and opportunities in the counseling field.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    11Fall, Spring, Summer
  • COU 710 Counseling and Helping Relationships

    admission to Counseling program or Student Affairs in Higher Education program; and concurrent enrollment in COU 711.

    Two training components are integrated to provide an intensive pre-practicum experience. The didactic component introduces basic skills of effective interpersonal communication and counseling. Participation in corequisite laboratory (COU 711) provides supervised practice in the practical application of those skills in simulated counseling interviews.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    22Upon demand
  • COU 711 Counseling and Helping Relationships Lab

    admission to Counseling program or Student Affairs in Higher Education program.

    First enrollment must be concurrent with COU 710. Designed to accompany COU 710, this lab provides an opportunity for graduate students in counseling to practice basic counseling skills in role-played sessions with live observation, video-taped review and supervisory feedback. May be repeated to a maximum of three hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    13Upon demand
  • COU 714 Social-Cultural Diversity in Counseling

    admission to Counseling program or permission of instructor.

    An introduction to counseling theories, interventions and issues in working with clients from diverse, minority and ethnic cultures. Values, beliefs and norms of various cultures, including the student's, will be examined as they pertain to the counseling process.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 716 Adolescent and Young Adult Counseling in School and Mental Health Settings

    admission to Counseling program.

    An introduction to adolescent and young adult counseling theory designed to help students better prepare to work with adolescents and young adults in culturally diverse school and mental health counseling settings. Emphasis is placed on relevant developmental models and the ways in which life experiences that occur during adolescence can impact early adulthood.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    11Fall, Spring, Summer
  • COU 720 Substance Use and Addiction Issues in Counseling

    admission to Counseling program; and COU 708 or COU 751; and COU 710 and COU 711; or permission of the instructor.

    This course provides an overview of the biological, psychological, social and spiritual dimensions of substance use and dependency. Addictive behaviors are presented as part of the continuum of mental and emotional behavior, and the course will include co-occurring diagnoses and their associated interventions for counseling professionals. This includes diagnosis, treatment planning and implications for diverse populations. An integrated combination of lecture, case study, and field activities will be used.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 724 Assessment and Diagnosis

    admission to Counseling program; and COU 710 and COU 711.

    Study of and practice in conducting clinical interviews, appraising and assessing level of functioning and mental status, and developing diagnoses of psychoemotional disorders. Includes assessment of learning and functioning of children. An introduction to counseling theories, interventions and issues in working with clients from diverse, minority and ethnic cultures. Values, beliefs and norms of various cultures, including the student's, will be examined as they pertain to the counseling process.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 733 Couple and Family Counseling

    admission to Counseling program; and COU 710 and COU 711.

    An introduction to the major theories of couple and family counseling and their associated interventions. An integrated combination of lecture, discussion, demonstration and role-lay lab sessions will be used.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Upon demand
  • COU 751 Theories and Techniques of Counseling

    admission to Counseling program or permission of school.

    Examination of various theoretical approaches to counseling; significance of theories in counseling practice. Overview of interventions and techniques associated with each theory. Students make an intensive investigation of a problem to be selected in counseling theory and methods. Report of the investigation required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 752 Career Development

    admission to Counseling program.

    A consideration of the various theories of career development and their implications in counseling for vocational career development and their implications in counseling for vocational adjustment. A study of the work ethic, the labor force, and the concept of career education. Designed to give students competence in collecting and using occupational and educational information in counseling related to career development and in developing career education programs.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • COU 753 Analysis of Childhood Learning and Adjustment

    admission to Counseling program; and SPE 310 or SPE 340 or SPE 715; and COU 701.

    Acquaints student with various assessment and diagnostic procedures in evaluation of learning and adjustment problems.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 754 Counseling for Post-Secondary and Career Readiness K-12

    admission to Counseling program.

    This course is designed to prepare school counselors to engage a diverse K-12 student population in early career awareness, planning, assessment, and making informed post-secondary choices crossing the spectrum of K-12, using the ASCA National Model and Missouri Comprehensive Counseling Program as a framework. Career development theories will be explored to encourage developmentally and culturally relevant application to K-12 student populations and includes a focus on work-life adjustment into advanced adult ages, including ethical implications.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Summer
  • COU 756 Group Counseling and Group Work

    admission to Counseling program.

    Acquaints counselors with group counseling theories and techniques. Includes an experiential group component.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 757 Group Counseling Through Play

    COU 708; and admission to Counseling program or permission of instructor.

    Introduction to group therapy methods and techniques appropriate to an elementary school or mental health setting. Emphasis is placed upon foundational group therapy skills in general for all ages, and on play therapy modalities in particular, that are appropriate for elementary-age children. Groups in an elementary setting, utilizing Missouri Comprehensive Guidance and play therapy and applications to diverse populations, will be included.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 765 Research and Program Evaluation Seminar in Counseling

    admission to Counseling program; and SFR 780 or COU 794.

    The study, analysis, and discussion of special topics, including evaluation of counseling interventions, quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research, and practices in program evaluation and culminating in a substantial written report. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    22Upon demand
  • COU 766 Psychopharmacology for Counselors

    admission to Counseling Program or permission.

    Seminar course designed to teach current and future counselors the fundamentals of psychopharmacological agents used in mental health. Students will learn the fundamentals of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, and relevant aspects of neurochemistry. Once this foundation is formed, students will learn about the types of psychotropic medications commonly used for major mental health conditions, the nature of their actions, indications and contra-indications for use, common dosing guidelines, and side-effects and other related risks.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 768 Crisis Counseling and Disaster Mental Health Response

    admission to Counseling Program or permission.

    An introduction to Crisis and Disaster, to the major theories and practices of crisis Intervention and Disaster Mental Health and the associated interventions throughout the Response and Recovery phases. An integrated combination of lecture, discussion, demonstration and role-play will be used.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • COU 777 Counseling Practicum

    admission to Counseling program or certificate program; and B grade or better in COU 710 and COU 714 and COU 751; and COU 711; and approval of school approval for practicum.

    Supervised counseling experience involving work with clients from the community addressing a wide range of developmental, wellness, and health related presenting issues; observation, discussion, and evaluation of counseling sessions. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    39Fall, Spring, Summer
  • COU 778 Mental Health Practicum

    admission to Counseling program or certificate program; and P grade in COU 777.

    Supervised clinical mental health counseling experience of clients from the community; observation, discussion, and evaluation of counseling sessions. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    3Fall, Spring, Summer
  • COU 779 School Counseling Practicum

    P grade in COU 777; and admission to Counseling program or certificate program.

    Supervised clinical mental health counseling experience of clients from the community; observation, discussion, and evaluation of counseling sessions. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    3Fall, Spring, Summer
  • COU 780 Secondary School Counseling Practicum

    admission to Counseling program; and B grade or better in COU 710 and COU 714 and COU 751; and COU 711; and approval of school for practicum.

    Supervised counseling with secondary school aged students and their families; observation, discussion, and evaluation of the counseling process. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    36Fall, Spring
  • COU 781 Secondary School Counseling Internship

    admission to Counseling program; and COU 777 or COU 780 or COU 782 or COU 784; and either COU 778 or COU 779; and either ELE 302 or SEC 302; and permission of school.

    Supervised experience in secondary school counseling at an approved school site. Minimum of 300 hours on-site. Students will receive individual supervision on-site, and small-group supervision from the school. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    3110Upon demand
  • COU 782 Elementary School Counseling Practicum

    admission to Counseling program; and B grade or better in COU 708 and COU 710 and COU 714; and COU 711; and approval of school for practicum.

    Supervised counseling with elementary school-aged children and their parents; observation, discussion, and evaluation of counseling sessions. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    36Spring
  • COU 783 Elementary School Counseling Internship

    admission to Counseling program; and COU 777 or COU 780 or COU 782 or COU 784; and either COU 778 or COU 779; and either ELE 302 or SEC 302; and permission of school.

    Supervised experience in elementary school counseling at an approved school site. Minimum of 300 hours on-site. Students will receive individual onsite supervision, and small-group supervision from the school. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    3110Upon demand
  • COU 784 Mental Health Counseling Practicum

    admission to Counseling program; and B grade or better in COU 710 and COU 714 and COU 751; and COU 711; and approval of school for practicum.

    Supervised counseling experience of clients from the community; observation, discussion, and evaluation of counseling sessions. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    36Upon demand
  • COU 785 Mental Health Counseling Internship

    COU 777; and admission to Counseling program; and permission of school.

    Supervised experiences (individual, family, group) in counseling at an approved community agency site. Minimum of 300 hours on-site. Students will receive individual supervision on-site, and small group supervision from the school. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 787 Advanced Play Therapy Practicum

    admission to Counseling program; and COU 702 or COU 703; and COU 705 and COU 708 and COU 710 and COU 711 and COU 782; or permission of instructor.

    This course is designed to provide an advanced counseling experience with elementary-aged children from the community. It serves as an integrative component to extend and amplify play therapy counseling skills, theory, and techniques learned in previous practica. Emphasis is placed on scheduling clients, completing case notes, advocating for clients, weekly supervisor and evaluation of counseling sessions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • COU 788 Introduction to Supervision, Consultation and Leadership

    COU 710 and COU 711; and COU 780 or COU 782 or COU 784; and admission to Counseling EdS program or permission of school.

    This course is designed to address fundamental theoretical and applied aspects of clinical supervision, consultation, and leadership. Supervision addresses the theory and practice of clinical supervision in counseling and psychotherapy and provides a supervised, practical experience of doing counseling supervision in an applied setting. Consultation focuses on providing consultation services in schools and other systems. Since counselors and psychotherapists are often called upon within schools and agencies to provide leadership, the leadership component of this course surveys the literature on leadership styles, roles, and emerging trends.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COU 789 Advanced Level: Play Therapy Supervisor

    admission to Counseling program; and COU 702 or COU 703; and COU 705 and COU 708 and COU 710 and COU 711 and COU 782; or permission of instructor.

    This is a course with a practicum component on-site at the Center City Counseling Clinic. The purpose of the course is to provide supervisor training in the theory and practice of supervision with master's level play therapy students to include three core knowledge areas: supervision models, theories and techniques of clinical supervision of play therapy; legal and ethical issues related to supervision; and clinical issues related to supervision.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • COU 790 Counseling Workshop

    Improves skills and knowledge of counselors in specific areas. Each workshop considers a single topic in depth. 30 hours of participation equal one semester hour.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Fall, Spring
  • COU 791 K-12 School Counseling Internship

    COU 777; and either ELE 302 or SEC 302; and admission to Counseling program; and permission of school.

    Supervised experience in school counseling at an approved school site. Minimum of 300 hours on-site. Students will receive individual supervision on-site, and small-group supervision from the school. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    3-6Fall, Spring
  • COU 794 Introduction to Research and Program Evaluation in Counseling

    admission to Counseling program.

    Introduction to research methods in counseling, including quantitative and qualitative methods, action research, needs assessments, and program evaluation approaches, particularly in service-delivery and educational settings. An emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of foundational research methods that will allow students to be effective critical consumers of research in counseling, identify evidence-based practices, and prepare them to design and implement sound program evaluations.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    22Upon demand
  • COU 795 Topics in Counseling

    Individual or group class designated to address specialized topics of interest to graduate students in counseling. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • COU 799 Thesis

    admission to Counseling Program or permission.

    Independent research and study connected with preparation of thesis.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Fall, Spring

Psychology (PSY) courses

  • PSY 101 Psychology for Personal Growth

    A study of the emotional, intellectual, and interpersonal experiences of self and others in order to enhance self-understanding, to make informed choices, and to promote adjustment. Will not count toward the major or minor in psychology.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 121 Introductory Psychology

    Focus on Social and Behavioral Sciences

    An examination of how psychology enhances our understanding of human behavior; a survey of basic biological, experiential, cognitive, emotional, and sociocultural influences on behavior and self-understanding. Students must choose either to be research participants or fulfill an alternative library assignment as part of the course requirements. Honors sections are taught in a lecture/lab format.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, SpringPSYC 100 - General Psychology.
  • PSY 150 Introduction to the Psychology Major

    Exploration of careers, educational paths, and professional development for new psychology majors (typically, first-year students, sophomores, and some transfer students with limited coursework completed in psychology.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Fall, Spring, Summer
  • PSY 160 The Pursuit of Happiness: A Psychological Perspective

    Explore the sources of our moods with an emphasis on skills for achieving healthy, happy, and productive feelings.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Upon demand
  • PSY 197 Topics in Psychology

    Selected topics especially appropriate for lower division students (examples: meaning of death, preparation for marriage, and child rearing practices). May be repeated to a maximum of four hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Fall, Spring
  • PSY 200 Psychological Statistical Methods

    PSY 121; and completion of General Education mathematics requirement.

    Principles and methods of statistics used in psychology; understanding and interpreting psychological data. Cannot receive credit toward a degree for more than one of the following courses: AGR 330, IPE 381, MTH 340, PSY 200, QBA 237, SPR 328, SOC 220.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • PSY 203 Introduction to Research

    PSY 121; and completion of General Education mathematics requirement.

    This course will provide an integrated approach to elementary research design and statistical methods. Students will review current research and develop small projects for which statistical methods will be selected and applied. This course cannot be substituted for PSY 200 and/or PSY 201 on the psychology major and will not count toward the Psychology major. This course is designed for psychology minors and will not prepare students for graduate work in Psychology.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • PSY 240 Psychology of Humor

    PSY 121.

    Introduction to psychology of humor, includes theories of humor and explorations of humor through different areas of psychology, for example cognitive, social, developmental, personality, and health psychology. Focus will be on thinking critically about humor research.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • PSY 250 Analysis of Interpersonal Behavior

    PSY 121 and permission of instructor.

    Ongoing processes of interpersonal behavior. Observation and experience as participant of a self-analytic group in the human relations laboratory.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    36Upon demand
  • PSY 300 Naturalistic Methods in Social Psychology

    PSY 121, and 6 additional hours of Psychology.

    An alternative approach to social psychological processes. Involves text analysis, materials analysis, interviewing, and participant observation in naturally occurring, non-laboratory field settings. Focus will be on small group behavior.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 302 Experimental Psychology

    PSY 121 and PSY 200.

    Research methods in Psychology; major emphasis on experimentation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • PSY 303 Stress and Tension Control

    PSY 121.

    An examination of the nature and treatment of the stress response. Laboratory experience with several forms of relaxation training including biofeedback.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Upon demand
  • PSY 304 Abnormal Psychology

    PSY 121.

    Psychopathology and the systems of classification, methods of assessment, and modes of treatment from research, clinical, ethical, and cultural perspectives.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • PSY 305 Introduction to Industrial-Organizational Psychology

    PSY 121.

    A survey of the major topics that are studied and the methods that are used in I-O psychology. The topics and methods will be viewed from a psychological perspective and will include psychological testing and personnel selection; training and development; job analysis, employee evaluation and performance appraisal; human motivation and job satisfaction; leadership, communication and group processes; organization theory and development.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 306 Learning Processes

    PSY 121.

    A survey of the methods of classical and instrumental conditioning.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 307 Human Sexuality

    PSY 121.

    A balanced and comprehensive perspective of the field of human sexuality. Content includes the psychological, physiological, and interpersonal variables of human sexuality.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 309 Identity and Aging in Literature and Film

    ENG 110 and PSY 121.

    Emphasizes the experience of aging as perceived from the older person's point of view and that of society. Situations in later life will be explored through the use of short stories, selected articles, and videos. The topics covered will include health, friendship and relationships, widowhood, family and intergenerational relationships, perceptions of death and dying, and finding purpose and meaning in life. Students will acquire a basic understanding of identity issues and factors that contribute to well-being in later life. Identical with GER 309. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 309 and GER 309.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • PSY 310 Applied Psychology

    PSY 121.

    Practical areas of application of psychology. Limited enrollment; field trips required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 311 Service-Learning in Psychology

    30 hours, concurrent registration in a Psychology course designated as a service-learning offering.

    This service component for an existing course incorporates community service with classroom instruction in psychology to provide an integrative learning experience that addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of, and participation, in public affairs. Includes 40 hours of service that benefits an external community organization, agency, or public service provider. Approved service placements and assignments will vary depending on the course topic and learning objectives; a list of approved placements and assignments is available from the instructor and the Citizenship and Service-Learning Office. May be repeated.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1Fall, Spring
  • PSY 315 History and Systems of Psychology

    PSY 121 and 6 additional hours of psychology.

    Present psychological systems in the light of their historical development from ancient Greek and medieval thought.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 317 Psychology of Addictions

    PSY 121.

    Students in the course will learn basic psychological and psychophysiological processes involved in the progression of substance use, abuse, and addiction. Topics covered will include the conduct of individual assessment, interviewing techniques, and counseling processes. This course is intended to give students an understanding of individual, motivational, and social psychological perspectives.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 320 Psychology and the Law

    PSY 121.

    This course is a survey of psychology applied to the legal system. The course includes topics in mental health law, such as competency and insanity, as well as the psychology of law enforcement, crime, juries, eyewitness testimony, and legal socialization.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 330 Psychology of Digital Success

    declared Psychology major.

    Our world is becoming increasingly digital. Achieving and succeeding in educational and workplace settings now requires a range of digital learning, literacy, and citizenship skills. Using a self-regulation framework, this course will explore the role of these skills needed to engage effectively in a digital learning environment. Students will synthesize information regarding self-regulation approaches and digital literacy, learning, citizenship, and professional community to create an action-oriented plan for success in future digital and seated learning environments. To support the development of this plan, students will learn to: find, use, share, and evaluate information from online sources, accessing commonly used digital learning platforms, sites, and resources; analyze digital citizenship in the context of both academic and global communities; participate in online professional communities for students and professionals in the field of psychology; reflect on current readiness for online learning and engagement using self-assessments; and utilize evidence-based approaches to stress management and problem solving to support psychological well-being.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Upon demand
  • PSY 331 Psychology of Childhood

    PSY 121.

    This course examines major psychological issues, theories and research concerning child development. Influences on cognitive, personality and social development are analyzed.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 336 Ethology

    PSY 121.

    The study of the behavior of animals in a natural setting will be emphasized. The viewpoints of ethology, comparative psychology, behavioral ecology, and sociobiology will be used to study the behavior of animals, including humans. This course cannot be credited toward a degree if the student has taken PSY 497: Animal Behavior.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 339 Introduction to Clinical Psychology

    PSY 121 and PSY 304.

    A survey of the field of clinical psychology from a broad conceptual and historic perspective. The course examines professional issues such as various mental health delivery systems, ethics, and graduate training. The course also presents an overview of different approaches to psychotherapy along with assessment methods commonly used in evaluation of therapy, research, and decision making in a clinical setting.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 350 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging

    PSY 121.

    Principles and practical applications in development of the adult. Includes psychological effects of personality and intellect. Both normal and abnormal phenomena are considered. Identical with GER 351. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 350 and GER 351.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 354 Gender and Sexuality in Later Life

    PSY 121; and GST 170 or 45 hours.

    A comparison of the aging experiences of men and women in later life. The relevance of gender, gender roles and sexuality to the aging process will be considered. Specific topics of analysis will include the gender gap in longevity, psychological and physical health, LGBTQ status, minority status, socioeconomic status, family relationships, and public policy issues. Identical with GER 354. Cannot receive credit for both GER 354 and PSY 354.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • PSY 357 Psychology of Gender

    PSY 121.

    This course will provide an in-depth examination and survey of the research and theory on psychological gender differences and similarities. An exploration will be made of the influence of biology, social, and culture on the development of gender in a variety of areas (e.g., emotions, attitudes, relationships, aggression, mental health, physical health, stress, coping, intelligence, work and achievement).

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • PSY 359 Theories of Social Psychology

    PSY 121 or SOC 150.

    A survey of research strategies in social psychology; social perception; interpersonal attraction; attitudes and persuasion; sex differences in social behavior.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • PSY 360 Educational Psychology

    PSY 121.

    Introduction to theory and research in educational psychology. Topics include cognitive and social development, learning, memory, cognition, intelligence, motivation, measurement, and individual differences.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 363 Death and Human Behavior

    PSY 121.

    An introduction to the varied aspects of death and dying. The course will focus on attitudes toward death, fears of death and dying, special needs of those who have a life threatening illness, means of helping the survivors and techniques for prolonging life. Identical with GER 363. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 363 and GER 363.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 366 Families in Later Life

    PSY 121; and CFD 155 or CFD 163 or 30 hours.

    Examination of the structure and function of families in later life. Topics of interest include demographic trends impacting the structure of the family, marriage, sibling relations, parent-adult child relations, grandparenthood, widowhood, and retirement. The application of family theories and their relevance to later life families will be discussed. Identical with CFD 365, GER 365, and SWK 365. Can only receive credit for one of following: CFD 365, GER 366, PSY 366, or SWK 365.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • PSY 370 Mental Health and Aging

    PSY 121.

    Personality adjustment in old age, with emphasis both on adequate and maladjusted development. Factors influencing adjustment are considered. Both functional and organic sources of maladjustment are surveyed. Identical with GER 370. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 370 and GER 370.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • PSY 379 Environmental Psychology

    PSY 121.

    An introduction to the psychological predictors, processes, and outcomes associated with individual and group decision making about sustainable living, including individual differences, motivation, social influence, self-regulation, altruism, persuasion, ethics, and emotive responses. These variables will then be applied to issues of individual and social behavior change.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • PSY 380 Development of the Student

    PSY 121; and either ELE 302 or SEC 302.

    Life-span development, with a strong emphasis on grades K-12. Includes cognitive, physical, social, and emotional development. Coverage of developmental issues, such as divorce, child abuse, substance abuse, sexuality, and peer pressure. Also includes learning and motivation theory. Required for students seeking special education, K-9, or K-12 certification. Also will count toward any certification. May substitute for PSY 385 or PSY 390. Will not count towards the major or minor in psychology. Credit will be awarded for only one of the following: PSY 380, PSY 385, PSY 390.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    44Fall, Spring
  • PSY 385 Development of the Early Childhood and Elementary School Student

    PSY 121.

    Life-span development, with a strong emphasis on preschool through sixth grade. Coverage of developmental issues, such as divorce, child abuse, substance abuse, and peer pressure. Also includes learning and motivation theory. Required for students seeking early childhood, early childhood-special education, or elementary education certification. PSY 380 may be taken instead of PSY 385. Will not count towards special education, K-9, K-12, middle school or secondary education certification. Will not count towards the major or minor in psychology. Credit will be awarded for only one of the following: PSY 380, PSY 385, PSY 390.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 390 Development of the Adolescent Student

    PSY 121 and SEC 302.

    Life-span development, with a strong emphasis on the middle school and secondary education years. Includes cognitive, physical, social, and emotional development. Coverage of developmental issues, such as substances abuse, sexuality, divorce, and peer pressure. Also includes learning and motivation theory. Required for students seeking middle school or secondary education certification. PSY 380 may be taken instead of PSY 390. Will not count towards special education, K-9, K-12, early childhood, early childhood-special education or elementary education certification. Will not count towards the major or minor in psychology. Credit will be awarded for only one of the following: PSY 380, PSY 385, PSY 390.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 405 Exercise Psychology

    PSY 121.

    An examination of the research, theory, and practical applications of the field of exercise psychology. Content includes exercise adherence, psychological effects of exercise, and motivation to continue programs. Intersession course only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Upon demand
  • PSY 411 Psychology of Diversity

    senior standing; and 24 hours of Psychology.

    Knowledge base, theory, research, professional ethics, workplace skills, and cultural context related to diversity. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • PSY 422 Memory and Cognition

    PSY 121 and 6 additional hours of psychology.

    Theoretical, empirical, and practical consideration of human memory and cognition. Laboratory will focus on investigation and demonstration of various cognitive phenomena.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Spring
  • PSY 424 Teaching of Psychology

    permission of instructor.

    This course is open only to psychology majors who have completed the application and selection process for an undergraduate learning assistant in Introductory Psychology and who are available to attend training sessions prior to the beginning of semester. Students will be assisting in the teaching of Introductory Psychology by serving as undergraduate learning assistants. Experiences will include facilitating group study sessions, individually mentoring students, and gaining exposure to the skills necessary for successful teaching. Emphasis will be on learning and practicing mentoring skills, the implementation of innovative pedagogical techniques, and course development. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 441 Psychology of Adolescence

    PSY 121 and one additional psychology course, and junior standing.

    This course examines major psychological issues, theories, and research concerning adolescent development. Influences on cognitive, personality, and social development are analyzed.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 481 Human Engineering

    PSY 121 or 60 hours.

    Focuses on systematic attempts to develop principles and data to be applied in adapting equipment, machines, work space, and environments for human use.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • PSY 486 Management and Assessment in the Middle and Secondary Classroom

    admission to Teacher Education; and PSY 360 or equivalent competencies.

    Planning, constructing, using, and analyzing a variety of assessment practices and understanding uses of standardized testing in education. Covers adolescent social behavior, management theory and strategies that promote effective learning and development while minimizing disruptive behavior. Application of theory to classroom practice and everyday situations. Identical with SFR 486. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 486 and SFR 486.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • PSY 487 Behavior Problems of Childhood

    PSY 121 or PSY 331.

    Survey of the patterns of maladjustment in childhood from infancy through early adolescence. Introduction to the concepts related to the origin, manifestation, and treatment of childhood psychopathology emphasizing a developmental approach.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 490 Preparation for Graduate School

    Primarily for senior students considering graduate study in psychology and related fields. Emphasis is on career awareness and the practical activities involved in the application process.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Fall
  • PSY 493 Directed Readings in Educational Psychology

    PSY 121 and permission of instructor.

    This course is designed for transfer students who are seeking teacher certification and who need to complete a limited number of MOSTEP standards. The course will involve inquiry into selected topics of educational psychology.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1Fall, Spring
  • PSY 495 Senior Seminar

    senior standing (90 hours); and 27 hours of Psychology.

    Activities to help students identify and explore postgraduate career opportunities. A major field achievement test and program evaluation will be administered.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Fall, Spring
  • PSY 496 Directed Readings in Psychology

    10 hours of psychology and permission of department head.

    Outstanding students who wish to undertake directed readings must consult with a professor of the school who specializes in the area selected, and with his or her consent present a written proposal to the school director for approval. Such proposals must be presented and approved before final registration for the course. Credited only on BA and BS degrees. May be repeated tor a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-4Fall, Spring
  • PSY 497 Advanced Topics in Psychology

    9 hours of psychology.

    In depth inquiry into selected topics of psychology. Approved recurring course topic: Ethical Issues and Concepts. Exploration of the ethical principles and standards that guide the practice of psychology. Approved recurring course topic: Psychological Disorders in the Movies. Exploration and examination of psychological disorders in film. Approved recurring course topic: Psychology of Sexual and Intimate Relationships. Exploration of issues related to sexual and intimate relationships including techniques to enhance communication, sexual intimacy and relationships. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours if topic is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Fall, Spring
  • PSY 498 Directed Research

    PSY 121 and permission of sponsoring faculty member and school director.

    Allows students to gain research experience by working with an individual faculty member either as a research assistant or as a primary researcher working under faculty supervision. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-4Fall, Spring
  • PSY 499 Practicum in Psychology

    PSY 121 and 14 additional hours of psychology and permission of school director.

    Offers an opportunity for the student to obtain experience through field work. Such experience need not be confined to the campus. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-4Fall, Spring
  • PSY 502 Learning Theories

    PSY 121 and 3 additional hours of psychology.

    An introduction to contemporary theories about learning and behavior, emphasizing the experimental basis of these phenomena. May be taught concurrently with PSY 602. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 502 and PSY 602.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • PSY 505 Forensic Child Psychology

    PSY 121.

    Explores the basics of forensic psychology with emphasis on factors that affect children, how these factors are assessed and how communities intervene to reduce both child crime and child victimization. The class will involve text analysis as well as analysis of primary source readings. May be taught concurrently with PSY 604. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 505 and PSY 604.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 506 Perception

    PSY 121 and 3 additional hours of psychology.

    Nature of perception, concept formation and role of language. May be taught concurrently with PSY 606. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 506 and PSY 606.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • PSY 508 Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis

    PSY 121.

    Serves as an introduction to the field of applied behavior analysis. During this course, students are introduced to content areas contained in the Behavior Analysis Certification Board Task List. This includes core concepts such as reinforcement, punishment, stimulus control, and principles of shaping. Students will be introduced to functional assessments and functional analyses. Additional topics include verbal behavior and ethical considerations for behavior analysts. May be taught concurrently with PSY 614. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 508 and PSY 614.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • PSY 510 Research in Psychology

    PSY 121; and PSY 200 or equivalent; and PSY 302.

    Advanced course in research methodology for psychology. The course focuses on individual research projects.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    432Fall
  • PSY 512 Personality Theory and Systems

    PSY 121 and PSY 304.

    Current theories of personality, research background and historical development. May be taught concurrently with PSY 612. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 512 and PSY 612.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • PSY 513 Neuropsychology

    PSY 121 and 3 additional hours of Psychology.

    Introduction to the field of neuropsychology. Includes careers, history, behavioral changes after brain injury, assessment, and ethical considerations. May be taught concurrently with PSY 613. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 513 and PSY 613.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 514 Psychology of Child Abuse and Exploitation

    PSY 121 and 60 hours.

    Study of forensic issues related to child abuse and exploitation. Students will gain an understanding of the forensic and psychological issues that often arise during child abuse investigations. The Child Advocacy Center, Inc. will participate in the design of the course, thus the specific forensic issues discussed will remain current and may change based on the needs of the community. May be taught concurrently with PSY 617. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 514 and PSY 617.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 519 Cognitive Development

    PSY 121 and PSY 331 and 3 additional hours of psychology.

    Study of cognitive development in children and adolescents. Topics to be included: perception, memory, visual imagery, problem solving, language development, cognitive style, social learning theory, information processing theory, and Piaget's theory. Applications in education, child rearing, and behavior management. May be taught concurrently with PSY 619. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 519 and PSY 619.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 521 Physiological Psychology

    PSY 121 and 3 additional hours of psychology.

    Physiological correlates underlying behavior, including sensory and response mechanisms, central nervous system. May be taught concurrently with PSY 622. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 521 and PSY 622.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • PSY 523 Psychology and Language

    An examination into the nature of and research in human language and its relationship to psychology. Topics will include the biological bases of language, speech production and perception, word recognition, sentence processing, reading, discourse, dyslexia, grammar and the lexicon. This course will cover current theories on these topics and experimental paradigms analyzing language and psychology. May be taught concurrently with PSY 623. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 523 and PSY 623.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • PSY 524 Honors Project in Psychology

    PSY 121; and PSY 200 or equivalent; and PSY 302; and PSY 510, and permission of sponsoring faculty member and school director; open to Honors College students only.

    Students will revise and expand their individual research project completed for PSY 510. The final project from this course must be submitted to a student conference or student journal, as well as to the Honors College as the student's Honors Project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    3Upon demand
  • PSY 525 Motivation and Emotions

    PSY 121 and 3 additional hours of psychology.

    Psychological and physiological motives, needs, drives and instinctual mechanisms; emotional effects of these upon the organism. May be taught concurrently with PSY 625. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 525 and PSY 625.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • PSY 527 Advanced Psychological Statistical Methods

    introductory statistics selected from: PSY 200, 711; AGR 330; MTH 340; QBA 237; SPR 328; SOC 220; or equivalent.

    A review of introductory statistics and investigation of research methods in behavioral sciences that require multivariate statistical models. This course takes an applied orientation and emphasizes the use of statistical packages. Topics include: linear models, principal components analysis, discriminant analysis, multiple regression analysis, multiple regression with categorical variables, and multi-factor ANOVA. May be taught concurrently with PSY 627. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 527 and PSY 627.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • PSY 529 Psychological Tests and Measurements

    PSY 121; and PSY 200 or equivalent.

    Theory and techniques underlying measurement of human traits and abilities. Critical analysis of intellectual, achievement, interest and personality tests, including their development, application and potential abuses. May be taught concurrently with PSY 629. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 529 and PSY 629.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 533 Psychological Issues in Religion

    PSY 121.

    Comprehensive overview of historical background, research methods, and contemporary issues involving behavior and religious beliefs. Psychological research in the areas of religious development and cognition will be included. May be taught concurrently with PSY 633. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 533 and PSY 633.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • PSY 534 Psychology of Infancy

    PSY 121 and PSY 331.

    Theory and research on the maturation and cognition of the human infant in the first two years, from a developmental psychometric perspective. General principles of the mental and motor assessment of the infant and interpretation will be emphasized through class demonstrations so that the student may understand the use of these procedures in interpreting development and research. May be taught concurrently with PSY 634. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 534 and PSY 634.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 535 Discipline and Social Behavior in the Classroom

    PSY 121; and PSY 360 or PSY 380 or PSY 385 or PSY 390.

    Provides a psychological perspective of individual and social factors necessary to develop an effective eclectic approach to discipline and an understanding of social behavior in the classroom. Includes an emphasis on personal, social, and motivational development. May be taught concurrently with PSY 635. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 535 and PSY 635.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 550 Psychological Testing in Remedial Reading

    permission of school director.

    Techniques and skills in utilizing psychological tests as they pertain to diagnosing reading disabilities and prediction of success in remedial programs. Students receive supervised practice in administration. May be taught concurrently with PSY 648. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 550 and PSY 648.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Upon demand
  • PSY 555 Developing Sport Team Leaders

    This delivers leadership, team processes, and motivation principles to help coaches develop the leadership skills of sport team athletes. This course aligns sport program goals with educational goals by utilizing athletic settings to promote skills that student-athletes can apply on sport teams and in other group settings. Coaches will learn how to set specific leadership goals with team leader-athletes and will learn concrete and constructive ways to mentor leader-athletes. Coaches will use course principles to construct a plan for developing sport team leaders and for making "team leadership" a core team value. May be taught concurrently with PSY 649. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 555 and PSY 649.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Upon demand
  • PSY 556 Developing Sport Team Leaders Practicum

    PSY 555 or concurrent enrollment; and permission of instructor.

    Complementing PSY 555 Developing Sport Team Leadership, this course provides a 2-credit option for students to document the application of a leadership development plan on a sport team. This course reinforces the value of leadership and leadership development on sport teams by helping to make "team leadership" a core team value. Advancing this objective, students learn to align the values of sport teams with the broader values of educational institutions. Students taking this course must provide evidence that they have permission to implement a leadership development program on an organized sport team prior to enrolling in the class (hours the student spends with the team must exceed 90 hours). May be taught concurrently with PSY 656. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 556 and PSY 656.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    22Upon demand
  • PSY 557 Forensic Psychology: Child Abuse and the Law

    PSY 121 and 60 hours.

    Study of the legal issues related to child abuse and exploitation. Students will gain an understanding of the law pertaining to child cases and how interactions with children can bolster or diminish the quality of children's memory report as seen by the judicial system. The Greene County Prosecutor's Office will participate in the design of this course, thus the specific legal issues discussed will remain current and may change based on the needs of the community. May be taught concurrently with PSY 657. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 557 and PSY 657.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 565 Psychological Effects of Dementia

    PSY 121 and PSY 370.

    Description of dementias, with particular references to Alzheimer's Disease and with emphasis on behavioral consequences for both patient and caregiver. Directed practicum. May be taught concurrently with PSY 669. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 565 and PSY 669.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    424Upon demand
  • PSY 597 Specialized Topics in Psychology

    9 hours of Psychology.

    Specialized investigation into selected topics in psychology. Graduate students will be required to complete an extra project to be determined by the instructor. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours if topic is different. May be taught concurrently with PSY 695. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 597 and PSY 695.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • PSY 602 Learning Theories

    An introduction to contemporary theories about learning and behavior, emphasizing the experimental basis of these phenomena. May be taught concurrently with PSY 502. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 502 and PSY 602.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 604 Forensic Child Psychology

    Explores the basics of forensic psychology with emphasis on factors that affect children, how these factors are assessed and how communities intervene to reduce both child crime and child victimization. The class will involve text analysis as well as analysis of primary source readings. May be taught concurrently with PSY 505. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 505 and PSY 604.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 606 Perception

    Nature of perception, concept formation and role of language. May be taught concurrently with PSY 506. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 506 and PSY 606.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 612 Personality Theory and Systems

    Current theories of personality, research background and historical development. May be taught concurrently with PSY 512. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 512 and PSY 612.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 613 Neuropsychology

    Introduction to the field of neuropsychology. Includes careers, history, behavioral changes after brain injury, assessment, and ethical considerations. May be taught concurrently with PSY 513. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 513 and PSY 613.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 614 Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis

    Serves as an introduction to the field of applied behavior analysis. During this course, students are introduced to content areas contained in the Behavior Analysis Certification Board Task List. This includes core concepts such as reinforcement, punishment, stimulus control, and principles of shaping. Students will be introduced to functional assessments and functional analyses. Additional topics include verbal behavior and ethical considerations for behavior analysts. May be taught concurrently with PSY 508. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 508 and PSY 614.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 617 Psychology of Child Abuse and Exploitation

    Study of forensic issues related to child abuse and exploitation. Students will gain an understanding of the forensic and psychological issues that often arise during child abuse investigations. The Child Advocacy Center, Inc. will participate in the design of the course, thus the specific forensic issues discussed will remain current and may change based on the needs of the community. May be taught concurrently with PSY 514. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 514 and PSY 617.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 619 Cognitive Development

    Study of cognitive development in children and adolescents. Topics to be included: perception, memory, visual imagery, problem solving, language development, cognitive style, social learning theory, information processing theory, and Piaget's theory. Applications in education, child rearing, and behavior management. May be taught concurrently with PSY 519. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 519 and PSY 619.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 622 Physiological Psychology

    Physiological correlates underlying behavior, including sensory and response mechanisms, central nervous system. May be taught concurrently with PSY 521. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 521 and PSY 622.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 623 Psychology and Language

    An examination into the nature of and research in human language and its relationship to psychology. Topics will include the biological bases of language, speech production and perception, word recognition, sentence processing, reading, discourse, dyslexia, grammar and the lexicon. This course will cover current theories on these topics and experimental paradigms analyzing language and psychology. May be taught concurrently with PSY 523. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 523 and PSY 623.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 625 Motivation and Emotions

    Psychological and physiological motives, needs, drives and instinctual mechanisms; emotional effects of these upon the organism. May be taught concurrently with PSY 525. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 525 and PSY 625.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 627 Advanced Psychological Statistical Methods

    A review of introductory statistics and investigation of research methods in behavioral sciences that require multivariate statistical models. This course takes an applied orientation and emphasizes the use of statistical packages. Topics include: linear models, principal components analysis, discriminant analysis, multiple regression analysis, multiple regression with categorical variables, and multi-factor ANOVA. May be taught concurrently with PSY 527. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 527 and PSY 627.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 629 Psychological Tests and Measurements

    Theory and techniques underlying measurement of human traits and abilities. Critical analysis of intellectual, achievement, interest and personality tests, including their development, application and potential abuses. May be taught concurrently with PSY 529. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 529 and PSY 629.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 633 Psychological Issues in Religion

    Comprehensive overview of historical background, research methods, and contemporary issues involving behavior and religious beliefs. Psychological research in the areas of religious development and cognition will be included. May be taught concurrently with PSY 533. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 533 and PSY 633.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 634 Psychology of Infancy

    Theory and research on the maturation and cognition of the human infant in the first two years, from a developmental psychometric perspective. General principles of the mental and motor assessment of the infant and interpretation will be emphasized through class demonstrations so that the student may understand the use of these procedures in interpreting development and research. May be taught concurrently with PSY 534. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 534 and PSY 634.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 635 Discipline and Social Behavior in the Classroom

    Provides a psychological perspective of individual and social factors necessary to develop an effective eclectic approach to discipline and an understanding of social behavior in the classroom. Includes an emphasis on personal, social, and motivational development. May be taught concurrently with PSY 535. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 535 and PSY 635.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 648 Psychological Testing in Remedial Reading

    permission of school director.

    Techniques and skills in utilizing psychological tests as they pertain to diagnosing reading disabilities and prediction of success in remedial programs. Students receive supervised practice in administration. May be taught concurrently with PSY 550. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 550 and PSY 648.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Upon demand
  • PSY 649 Developing Sport Team Leaders

    This course delivers leadership, team processes, and motivation principles to help coaches develop the leadership skills of sport team athletes. This course aligns sport program goals with educational goals by utilizing athletic settings to promote skills that student-athletes can apply on sport teams and in other group settings. Coaches will learn how to set specific leadership goals with team leader-athletes and will learn concrete and constructive ways to mentor leader-athletes. Coaches will use course principles to construct a plan for developing sport team leaders and for making "team leadership" a core team value. May be taught concurrently with PSY 555. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 555 and PSY 649.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    11Upon demand
  • PSY 656 Developing Sport Team Leaders Practicum

    PSY 649 or concurrent enrollment.

    Complementing PSY 649 Developing Sport Team Leadership, this course provides a 2-credit option for students to document the application of a leadership development plan on a sport team. This course reinforces the value of leadership and leadership development on sport teams by helping to make "team leadership" a core team value. Advancing this objective, students learn to align the values of sport teams with the broader values of educational institutions. Students taking this course must provide evidence that they have permission to implement a leadership development program on an organized sport team prior to enrolling in the class (hours the student spends with the team must exceed 90 hours). May be taught concurrently with PSY 556. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 556 and PSY 656.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    22Upon demand
  • PSY 657 Forensic Psychology: Child Abuse and the Law

    Study of the legal issues related to child abuse and exploitation. Students will gain an understanding of the law pertaining to child cases and how interactions with children can bolster or diminish the quality of children's memory report as seen by the judicial system. The Greene County Prosecutor's Office will participate in the design of this course, thus the specific legal issues discussed will remain current and may change based on the needs of the community. May be taught concurrently with PSY 557. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 557 and PSY 657. Identical with CRM 657. Cannot receive credit for both CRM 657 and PSY 657.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • PSY 669 Psychological Effects of Dementia

    Description of dementias, with particular references to Alzheimer's Disease and with emphasis on behavioral consequences for both patient and caregiver. Directed practicum. May be taught concurrently with PSY 565. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 565 and PSY 669.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    424Upon demand
  • PSY 695 Specialized Topics in Psychology

    Specialized investigation into selected topics in psychology. Graduate students will be required to complete an extra project to be determined by the instructor. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours if topic is different. May be taught concurrently with PSY 597. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 597 and PSY 685.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • PSY 700 Problems of Psychology

    Individual investigation into a problem or problems of concern to the student and deemed of significance by the instructor. Written report required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • PSY 701 Symposium in Psychology

    Specific topics selected to introduce graduate students to research and theory. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • PSY 703 Human Growth and Development

    Depth investigation of growth and development during elementary school years. Experimental evidence and clinical evaluations used to supplement consideration of major theories of development.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 705 Psychology of Adolescence

    Depth investigation of growth and development during the adolescent period. Experimental evidence and clinical evaluation used to supplement consideration of major theories of adolescence.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 707 Psychology of the Adult

    Development of intellectual functions, personality, and social psychological processes across the adult life span will be emphasized. Normal as well as abnormal phenomena unique to young, middle-aged, and elderly adults will also be considered.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 708 Memory

    Provides in-depth analyses of historical and current theories and associated research in higher mental cognition processing. Primary emphasis is on normal human adult functioning, although associated topics such as cognitive development, learning dysfunctions and skill enhancement will be considered.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 709 Psychological Evaluation of Pre-School Children

    Program involving both theory and practice in psychological evaluation of pre-school children.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 710 Psychology of Education

    Orientation to the use of psychology in education.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 711 Introductory Statistics for Education and Psychology

    Statistical techniques used in education and psychology; overview of scaling techniques, sampling, descriptive techniques, inferential techniques (to include t and x2), reliability and validity.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 716 Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management

    A survey of the psychological principles, theory, and research related to human resource practices in organizations. Topics include job analysis, performance appraisal and criterion development, EEO compliance, individual differences measurement, selection and validation research.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Upon demand
  • PSY 718 Organizational Psychology

    A survey of the psychological principles, theory, and research related to behavior in organizations. Topics include work motivation, job satisfaction and performance, leadership and group processes, organizational design and development.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 720 Individual Intelligence Testing

    PSY 629 or COU 701.

    Analysis of individual tests of intelligence; Wechsler Scales and the Revised Stanford Binet. Students receive supervised practice in administration, scoring and interpretation of individual tests.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Fall, Spring
  • PSY 721 Individual Intelligence Testing II

    PSY 629 or COU 701.

    Analysis of individual tests of intelligence; Stanford-Binet Fourth Edition and Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children. Students will receive supervised practice in administration, scoring, and interpretation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Upon demand
  • PSY 730 Projective Techniques

    COU 701 and PSY 720.

    Introduction to theory of and basic underlying projective methods.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 740 Psychological Assessment

    admission to MS in Psychology program.

    Students of clinical psychology will be introduced to the process of psychological diagnosis. They will be expected to master the administration, scoring, and interpretation of individual instruments and become acquainted with the foundations and theory and research on which they rest. In addition the course will emphasize the differential applicability of tests and assessment techniques to a wide range of referral problems and the principles of clinical inference that may be used to interpret, integrate, and communicate their diagnostic findings.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 742 Practicum in Psychological Assessment

    PSY 740 and PSY 750 and permission of instructor.

    Supervised experience in assessment, diagnoses and report-writing with clients at a community mental health facility. Site arrangements must be made by the Practicum Coordinator during the preceding semester. Consists of a one-hour seminar on campus and four hours at the practicum site each week. May be repeated and a minimum grade of B must be maintained.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    314Upon demand
  • PSY 745 Statistics and Research Design

    Use of the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) Models and Multivariate Analysis in the design and analysis of psychological experiments.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Fall
  • PSY 747 Single Subject Research Design in Applied Behavior Analysis

    admission to Behavior Analysis and Therapy program or permission of instructor.

    Provides instruction in the use of single subject design research methods, in both experimental and applied settings. Instruction provided in behavioral measurement via direct and indirect observation, the employment of group and individual (single-subject) time series designs, statistical approaches for within-group and single-subject design data analysis and interpretation, and use of data to evaluate interventions. The course also considers professional issues in the ethical conduct of research and practice.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 750 Advanced Survey of Psychology

    Reinforce breadth of knowledge of psychology in the areas of Biological bases of behavior, Sensation and Perception, Memory, Cognition, Motivation, Development and Social Psychology.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 751 Seminar in Methods of Research

    PSY 710 and PSY 711.

    Investigation of research methods employed in education and psychology.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 752 Research Methods

    PSY 745.

    Provides an understanding of the research methods employed in experimental and applied settings. Includes ethical considerations.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 753 Program Evaluation

    PSY 745.

    The application of research methods to the evaluation of programs and planned change interventions in organizations.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 757 Observational Methods and Functional Assessment

    admission to Behavior Analysis and Therapy program or permission of instructor.

    Current research and best practices in the area of behavioral assessment. Topics include behavioral definitions, observational recording techniques, data analysis, functional and stimulus preference assessment methods, and issues of validity and reliability of measurement.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 759 Teaching of Psychology

    Must be taken prior to or concurrent with first teaching of any regular or laboratory section of any course. Preparation for teaching college courses, includes development of personal philosophies of teaching; suggestions for active student learning; maintaining student motivation; preparing assignments, in-class presentations, and exams; grading; and classroom management. Designed to help graduate students prepare for their first independent college teaching experiences.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    11Upon demand
  • PSY 760 Clinical Communication Skills

    admission to MS in Psychology program.

    Introduction to the nature of the helping process with emphasis on strategies of behavior change, interpersonal communication, and development of basic helping skills.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 761 Ethical and Professional Issues

    admission to MS in Psychology or Applied Behavior Analysis program.

    An exploration of ethical issues, including values, professional responsibilities, and professional ethics codes. Issues are explored both from ethical and legal perspectives. Current professional issues, such as changing modes of assessment and intervention, are examined.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 764 Group Psychotherapy

    permission of instructor.

    An extensive analysis of the factors contributing to the development and maintenance of therapeutic groups in a variety of settings. The prevention and education uses of small groups and small group processes will be included.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 765 Psychotherapy and Counseling: Theories and Techniques

    admission to MS in Psychology program.

    Investigation of the major theoretical approaches and strategies of psychotherapy and counseling along with the techniques associated with each theory. Emphasis on theoretical bases and critical analysis of comparative research.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 766 Psychopathology

    permission of instructor.

    Focus is on the differential diagnosis of psychological disorders, the appropriate use of current diagnostic systems, and relevant research.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 767 Behavior Disorders of Childhood

    PSY 766.

    Course focuses on assessment and treatment of common childhood behavior disorders. The course emphasizes 1) the study of biological, behavioral, cognitive, and systemic variables in the development of childhood behavior disorders; 2) training in multiaxial diagnostic assessment; and 3) interventions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 768 Personality and Social Development

    A survey of the major theoretical and practical issues in the study of personality and social development. The course will focus on application of personality to universal human concerns.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 770 Behavioral Systems Analysis

    admission to Behavior Analysis and Therapy program or permission of instructor.

    Behavioral Systems Analysis (BSA) comes from a synthesis of the fields of behavior analysis and systems analysis and can be defined as the analysis of behavior that occurs in complex and organized social environments. This course will cover applications of BSA in order to promote behavioral solutions to socially significant practices within large social units like organizations and cultures. Applications will focus on settings such as organizations and the culture more broadly from a functional contextual perspective.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall (even-numbered years)
  • PSY 771 Occupational Health Psychology

    PSY 718.

    An in-depth consideration of the psychological principles, theory, research, applications and problems associated with occupational stress, safety and health. Topics include personal, organizational, work-related and social antecedents to stress, as well as the short-term and long-term responses to stress.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 772 Performance Assessment

    PSY 716 and PSY 745.

    An in-depth consideration of theory, research, applications and problems of performance assessment in organizations. Topics include criterion development and validation, models of effectiveness, performance appraisal, methods and sources of evaluation, performance feedback, team performance measurement, and biases in assessment.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 773 Human Factors

    PSY 751.

    Provides an introduction to human factors engineering (ergonomics) primarily in the workplace. Involves emphasis on analyzing job requirements, human capabilities, human-machine interactions, and safety.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 774 Training and Development

    PSY 716 and PSY 718.

    An in-depth consideration of theory, research, applications, and problems in the design, conduct and evaluation of training programs in organizational settings. Topics include needs assessment, theories of learning and motivation, transfer of training, and evaluation of training processes and outcomes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 776 Personnel Selection, Placement and Classification

    PSY 716 and PSY 745.

    An in-depth consideration of the theory, research, applications, and problems in matching of individual needs, preferences, skills and abilities with the needs and preferences of organizations. Topics include job analysis, theories of human performance, test development and use, alternative selection techniques, EEO law, criterion development, and validation of selection decisions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 777 Conceptual Foundations of Applied Behavioral Science

     admission to Behavior Analysis and Therapy program or permission of instructor.

    The course addresses the history of behavior analysis, philosophy of science, advanced behavioral principles and processes and their application to various content domains in the behavioral, social, and cognitive sciences (e.g., emotion, language, cognition, and culture).

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 778 Group Processes

    PSY 718.

    An in-depth consideration of theory, research, applications, and problems in group processes in organizations. Topics include models and typologies of group performance, group decision making, group social influence and ecology, leadership, and team staffing and development.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 779 Topics in Industrial-Organizational Psychology

    PSY 716 and PSY 718.

    Advanced study of selected topics in I-O psychology. Course requirements include extensive readings and a paper. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours if different topics.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 780 Social Psychology

    admission to MS in Psychology program.

    Advanced study of interactions and social cognition, including attitude change, person perception, and group dynamics.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 796 Practicum

    admission to MS in Psychology or Behavior Analysis and Therapy program.

    Offers an opportunity for the graduate student to gain additional training through field experiences in research, clinical or organizational settings. Such experience need not be confined to the campus. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Fall, Spring
  • PSY 797 Directed Research

    admission to MS in Psychology or Behavior Analysis and Therapy program.

    Offers an opportunity for the graduate student to gain additional training through guided research. Such research need not be confined to the campus. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Fall, Spring
  • PSY 798 Internship

    PSY 796 and permission.

    Supervised fieldwork in a professional psychology setting. Includes a seminar paper as a requirement.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Fall, Spring
  • PSY 799 Thesis

    admission to MS in Psychology or Behavior Analysis and Therapy program.

    Independent research and study leading to the completion of the thesis.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • PSY 800 History and Systems: Orientation to Clinical Psychology

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course is a study of the foundations of the discipline of clinical psychology and the relationship between historical development and current systems and issues within the field. Students will review the growth of the science of psychology, including principal systems, key theoretical debates and developments, and contemporary views on the history of the field. In addition, students will analyze the role the field of psychology has played in creating, perpetuating, and failing to challenge racism, discrimination, and other harms to communities of color and other underrepresented and marginalized groups and consider the current and future efforts to reconcile and repair both past and present inequities in the field.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 801 Philosophy and Contextual Behavioral Science

    PSY 800; and admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    Contextual Behavioral Science is grounded in the root philosophical models of functional contextualism as a contemporary extension of radical behaviorism. This course will explore the importance of philosophy in the science and practice of clinical psychology. Success, in this course, is achieved through successful working (i.e., pragmatic truth criterion) and behavior is examined as the on-going interaction between behavior (i.e., adaptive responses of individuals) and context (i.e., the environment within which behavior occurs). Students will explore functional contextualism within multiple current approaches to assessment and intervention across populations.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Summer
  • PSY 823 Psychopathology II

    PSY 766; and admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with an advanced understanding of adult and child psychopathology. Students will acquire detailed information related to the major adult and child psychological disorders, with an emphasis on low-prevalence disorders. Students will refine skills in utilizing the current DSM classification system to formulate diagnostic impressions for low-prevalence disorders. By the end of the course students should be able to consume a case study and develop a problem list, formulate diagnostic impressions, and be knowledgeable about the features (i.e., symptoms, course of illness, prognosis, comorbidity, and etiological theories) of a variety of low-prevalence psychological disorders. Additionally, students will consider cultural variables as they relate to differential diagnosis and discuss current and future trends in psychopathology.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Summer
  • PSY 824 Psychological Assessment II

    PSY 740; and admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course is designed to provide advanced training in the principles of psychological assessment. Training will be provided in diagnostic assessment using the DSM-5, with an emphasis on personality assessment, symptom-specific assessment tools, neuropsychological assessment tools and case formulation. Students will be expected to master the administration, scoring, and interpretation of individual instruments and become acquainted with the foundations and theory and research on which they rest. In addition, the course will emphasize the differential applicability of tests and assessment techniques to a wide range of referral problems and the principles of clinical inference that may be used to interpret, integrate, and communicate their diagnostic findings. Students will learn how to synthesize data from multiple sources and develop a case formulation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 830 Diversity and Inclusion in Psychology

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course is designed to develop an awareness of issues related to diversity and inclusion in the field of psychology and to build a foundation for multicultural competence. Students will explore contemporary theories and research, with an emphasis on how different cultural groups interact with a single social structure. As well, students will become familiar with the science and practice of multicultural psychology and with a clinical psychology emphasis. Students will gain an appreciation of the experience of oppressed and marginalized groups, with a goal of forming sensitive and informed therapeutic services. By the end of this course, students will be prepared to develop their professional skills in a way that is inclusive and effective given the cultural values, systems, and identities of a wide range of clients.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 831 Identity Development

    PSY 830; and admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course will explore identity development and considerations in prevention and treatment research within clinical psychology. Psychology has traditionally adopted a white normative view of intervention (i.e., treatment of disorders) with less attention given to the experiences of diverse populations and the prevention of psychological suffering. Course will explore the shared and diverse experiences of multiple communities on the basis of race, sexual orientation, gender identity, and neurological diversity. Prevention and intervention must consider the unique experiences of groups that have historically been underrepresented in practice and in research.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 850 Empirically Supported Treatment I

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with a breadth of empirically supported treatments for psychological disorders, with an emphasis on the delivery of evidence-based interventions for adults. Students will explore various approaches to intervention and consider the theoretical and conceptual foundations of each approach. Students will learn to establish and maintain effective therapeutic relationships and develop evidence-based treatment plans specific to client goals that are informed by current scientific literature, assessment findings, and relevant cultural and contextual variables. As well, students will learn to evaluate intervention effectiveness and adjust treatment plans accordingly.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 851 Empirically Supported Treatment II

    PSY 850; and admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with a breadth of empirically supported treatments for psychological disorders, with an emphasis on the delivery of evidence-based intervention for children and adolescents. Students will explore various approaches to intervention and consider theoretical and conceptual foundations of each approach as well as the specific considerations and challenges present when providing treatment to younger populations. Students will learn to develop evidence-based treatment plans specific to client goals that are informed by current scientific literature, assessment findings, and relevant cultural and contextual variables. As well, students will learn to evaluate intervention effectiveness and adjust treatment plans accordingly.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 890 Practicum in Clinical Psychology

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This practicum is designed for students to gain additional training through field experiences in clinical and applied settings. The experience is specifically designed to support students in integrating their academic experiences with experiences outside of the classroom, developing clinical skills as well as fulfilling program requirements. Students will receive a Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program handbook that will delineate specific expectations, requirements, and considerations for various practicum placements, and the course will include variable content given the practicum site to which a student is assigned. May be repeated to a maximum of 14 hours to fulfill degree requirements for the Doctor of Psychology program.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    2Upon demand
  • PSY 905 Biological Basis of Behavior

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course aims to provide an exposition of research and theory in the biological bases of normal and abnormal behavior with an introduction to psychopharmacology. A survey of literature will span from nerve cells, the organization and functioning of the nervous system, to the neurobiological systems and interventions that target sensation, motor behavior, emotion, cognition, self-other representation, and social behavior. Course will also integrate understanding of altered behavioral processes of brain-damaged and psychiatric patients with knowledge of basic neuronal and neurobiological processes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 906 Advanced Cognitive and Affective Psychology

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course explores the nature of human intellectual functioning, the cognitive basis of behavior and the research methods utilized. Topics pertaining to basic research and theory in cognition include the historical development of the empirical study of cognitive psychology, as well as how basic and complex mental processes contribute to human behavior. Topics discussed include the domains of perception, attention, memory, decision making, and language. This course also explores emotion and affective processing within the context of cognitive models and theory. Topics include basic emotions, emotion, consciousness and the brain, emotion and attention, emotion and memory, as well as prospective emotions and future directions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Summer
  • PSY 913 Program Evaluation and Qualitative Analysis

    PSY 752; and admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    An overview and in-class practice of qualitative research methods including in-depth interviewing, focus groups, naturalistic observation, content analysis, and thematic analysis of textual information. The course will use a combination of didactic, interactive, and applied techniques to teach knowledge and skills relevant to qualitative research. Through the course, students will be expected to conduct their own qualitative study and/or qualitative program evaluation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 932 Culturally Competent Therapy

    PSY 830 and PSY 831; and admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course is designed to develop students' multicultural competence in the practice of clinical psychology. Students will obtain a thorough review of multicultural competencies related to the practice of psychology. Students will be asked to thoroughly consider the intersectionality of clients' cultural identities (in terms of ethnicity, race, age, ability, religion, gender, sexual orientation, etc.) in forming sensitive and informed therapeutic services. In addition, students will consider how their own cultural identity informs their behavior as a professional. This course will include discussion both of the limitations of traditional assessment and therapeutic approaches and of how consideration of multicultural competencies can improve these services.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 941 Supervision, Consultation, and Professional Practice

    PSY 760 and PSY 761 and PSY 800; and admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course will examine the psychological principles and knowledge base underlying the major models and theories of individual, organizational consultation, and supervision, with an emphasis on two modes of service-related work that psychologists may be expected to participate in as professionals: consultation and clinical supervision. Within the context of consultation, students will develop knowledge and skills related to the construction, dissemination, and implementation of specialized programming offered to small (e.g. individual clients) and large (e.g. organizational) systems. Secondly, this course is designed to introduce developing clinicians to the process of supervision. Students will be introduced to and exposed to a number of theories, techniques, and processes that will help them become more effective supervisors. In addition, a number of additional topics relevant to professional practice will be addressed throughout the course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • PSY 942 Professional Seminar in Clinical Psychology

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    Professional seminars will provide in-depth inquiries into selected and variable topics relevant to the professional practice of clinical psychology. Seminar topics will be developed and provided based on current trends/needs within the field of psychology and the expertise of course instructors, and students may repeat this course for a maximum of five credit hours if the topic of each is different. Topics of professional seminars may include, but are not limited to: Grief Studies, LGBTQIA Community Topics, Business and Licensure, Psychopharmacology, Forensic Psychology, Prevention, Telehealth, and "Specialty" Courses in Assessment and Treatment (e.g., Process-Based Therapy, Neuropsychological Assessment).

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 952 Couples and Family Therapy

    PSY 850 and PSY 851; and admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course provides an exploration of select, major treatment approaches utilized in couples, marriage, and family therapy. The primary focus of this course will be the development of applied skills and techniques utilized in the treatment of couples and groups, including formulating hypotheses about couple and family structure and process, developing treatment goals for couples and families, and designing and practicing therapeutic and empirically supported interventions with pairs or groups of individuals. Students will be prepared to identify and respond to culturally sensitive issues and ethical issues that may arise during the treatment process.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 953 Advanced Clinical Case Conceptualization

    PSY 850 and PSY 851 and PSY 952; and admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    The purpose of this course is to develop advanced clinical case conceptualizations that integrate material covered throughout all previous courses and practicum experiences. The first part of the course will focus on clinical diagnosis and idiographic assessment to guide clinicians towards identifying effective processes of change. The assessment process emphasizes multicultural perspectives and moving beyond normalization. The second part of the course will focus on process-based intervention approaches that address process of change targets to achieve valued outcomes in the lives of clients. The final part of the course will focus on integrating analytic methods throughout assessment and treatment to ensure target outcomes are achieved with clients and can be conveyed to stakeholders and advocates of change.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • PSY 962 Behavioral Theories of Language and Cognition

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course will explore contemporary advances in behavioral theories of language and cognition as a centralizing framework for what it means to be human - with implications for assessment, prevention, and treatment. The course will primarily explore topics in stimulus equivalence and relational frame theory, as well as more advanced concepts like hyperdimensional and multilevel modelling and relational density theory. The course will emphasize hands-on learning and applications in psychological and behavioral treatment.  

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 970 Healing Historical Oppression: Context, Identity, and Intersectionality

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course highlights and pays tribute to the intellectual tradition of radical scholars, activists, and practitioners that laid the foundation for the study of healing of historical oppression. Rather than reducing the roots of oppression to individual-level phenomena, course will consider the extent to which individual experience exists in a dynamic relationship with oppressive structures of the everyday worlds that people inhabit. Course will examine various critical perspectives (within and outside the discipline) that may more adequately respond to interests of broad human liberation. Course includes foundational texts, emerging frameworks, multimedia links, and proposed assignments designed to encourage a deeper and revolutionary exploration of radical healing in psychological theory, research, practice, and action.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 971 Mental Health Disparities: Eliminating Barriers to Treatment

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course will introduce students to the concept of mental health equity and will provide a broad overview of mental health disparities in the United States. The course will examine relevant historical issues, theories, and empirical data, emphasizing critical theory and application of knowledge. Through readings, films, and class discussion course will trace the history of concepts related to race, gender, sex, and disability as they relate to mental health access. Course will highlight these cultural constructions and how they are incorporated into our systems of law and governance, and course will examine how cultural constructions lead to disparities in exposure to health hazards, and diagnosis and treatment of mental illness.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 972 Governance, Law, and Policy: Advocacy and Activism in Clinical Psychology

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of the legislative practice, specifically at the state level, with implications for addressing issues related to diversity and mental health disparities. Students learn how national and regional contexts shape political cultures, governing institutions, stakeholders, and strategies, and will develop tools to inform and influence policymaking given these differences. The course also covers conceptual and analytic frameworks for understanding political processes, institutions, stakeholders, contexts, and decision making. In addition, the course builds written and verbal communication skills, emphasizing the ability to convey clear and concise positions and to make requests related to public advocacy and activism

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 973 Multicultural Foundations in Practice: Assessment, Treatment, and Consultation

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    The purpose of this course is to explore multicultural foundations that relate to assessment, treatment, and consultation within clinical psychology. This class promotes an understanding and appreciation of cultural and ethnic differences among individuals, groups, and families and the impact of such differences on the theory and clinical practice of psychology. Activities within the course are designed to enhance students' abilities to apply their knowledge in the area of multicultural perspectives to their personal lives and professional work. Culture will be defined broadly to address ethnicity (including national origin), religion, gender, socioeconomic status, age, sexual orientation, and persons with disabilities.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 980 Clinical Health Psychology

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    The purpose of this course is to introduce the principles of clinical health psychology. The course will be divided into two primary sections: health promotion and disease prevention and chronic disease management. In the area of health promotion and disease prevention, students will explore health behaviors, stress and coping, and moderators of the stress response. In the area of chronic disease management, there will be an emphasis on healthcare and policy, the psychosocial aspects of coping with illness and a focus on cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, pain, and grief/life-limiting illness. Students will be prepared to continue studies within the area of integrated healthcare, work on multidisciplinary teams to support health and well-being, and engage in the area of public health policy.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 981 Integrated Healthcare: Advanced Topics

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course is designed to provide an overview of the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of illnesses and disorders commonly treated within an integrated healthcare system. Students will consider treatment from a multidisciplinary team-based approach that includes psychological, cognitive, and physiological processes, as well as the ethical and cultural considerations relevant to work in this area. Diagnoses and disorders including, but not limited to chronic pain, eating disorders, and substance use will be explored throughout this course. Students will be prepared to work in an integrated healthcare setting by developing a holistic understanding of the psychological and biological variables relevant to the various illnesses and disorders included.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 983 Consultation and Collaboration in Healthcare

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    This course will provide an overview of consultation and collaboration theory and process in the field of clinical psychology. Students will gain a foundation for facilitating change in human systems, as well as consultation with within integrated healthcare settings. This course will utilize reading from the required textbook, journal articles and other selected publications, lectures, discussion, and various activities to help students learn and apply the basics of consultation and collaboration to professional practice. Consultation models will be developed with an intentional view toward addressing mental health disparities and promoting equity and social justice in systems.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 990 Internship in Clinical Psychology

    14 hours of PSY 890; and admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    Doctoral-level clinical training will culminate in the Clinical Internship during students' final year. This advanced training experience will include direct assessment and intervention clinical hours, extensive advanced supervision, and didactics. Students will be challenged to further develop their clinical skills, advance their practical learning through experience, and expand their qualifications. Students will receive a Doctor of Psychology program handbook that will delineate specific expectations and requirements as well as describe the process through which students will apply for, obtain, and complete their internship experience and the course will include variable content given the internship site to which a student is accepted. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours to fulfill degree requirements for the Doctor of Psychology program.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • PSY 999 Dissertation in Clinical Psychology

    admission to Doctor of Psychology program or permission of instructor.

    The dissertation represents one of the culminating experiences of clinical psychology doctorate students. The purpose of the dissertation is to provide each student with the opportunity to conduct research at a level that conveys mastery of the scientific method within clinical practice (i.e., scientist-practitioner). The specific requirements for completion of the dissertation are described in the Doctor of Psychology program handbook. The topic, methods, and analytic strategy will be developed in conjunction with a faculty dissertation advisor and the final document will be defended to a selected faculty committee members from within and outside of the university. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours to fulfill degree requirements for the Doctor of Psychology program.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand

Social Work (SWK) courses

  • SWK 200 Introduction to Social Work

    This course is an introduction to the values, knowledge, and skills that guide the profession of social work. Examines practice interventions at the individual, family, group, organization and community levels. The fields and settings for social work practice are discussed. A C grade or better is required for admission to the BSW program.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • SWK 213 Social Welfare Policy and Services

    C grade or better in SWK 200 or concurrent enrollment.

    This course examines the historical development, philosophical orientation, and analysis of social welfare policy and services in the United States, as well as orienting students to the development of social work as a profession. The course focuses on the analytic and interactional strategies related to policy analysis, development, and implementation. Areas of study include domestic and global aspects of practice. A C grade or better is required for admission to the BSW program.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • SWK 219 Human Diversity

    Focus on Cultural Competence

    Content and skill development pertinent to working with diverse racial, cultural, ethnic, and other populations such as persons with physical disabilities and mental illnesses. This course is designed primarily to inform and sensitize individuals for effective interventions within a heterogeneous society. A C grade or better is required for admission to the BSW program.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • SWK 300 Service-Learning in Social Work

    30 hours and concurrent enrollment in SWK 213.

    This service component for an existing course incorporates community service with classroom instruction to provide an integrative learning experience that addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs. Includes 40 hours of service that benefits an external community organization or human/social service agency. Approved settings will focus on populations-at-risk, diverse populations and groups that have experienced social and economic injustice. A list of approved placements and assignments is available from the instructor and the Citizenship and Service-Learning Office. May be repeated. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    12Fall, Spring
  • SWK 304 Professional Development and Social Work Ethics

    admission to the BSW program.

    A critical exploration of self for the purpose of developing and demonstrating professional and ethical behavior as a change agent. This course will provide opportunities for self-reflection and personal and professional growth. The course will examine how the use of self influences ethical social work practice.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • SWK 307 Social Work Practice with Individuals

    admission to the BSW program.

    Basic principles, practice theories and skill for beginning generalist practice with individuals. Integrates practice theory and intervention skills within the context of the Generalist Intervention/Problem-Solving model. The class emphasizes personal awareness, professional growth, critical thinking and skills practice.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 313 Social Justice

    admission to the BSW program; and ECO 155 or ECO 165 or concurrent enrollment; and PLS 101.

    The primary subject matter of this course is social and economic inequality in United States society. Students are introduced to the patterns and processes of social and economic inequality in its major forms: class, race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual and political orientation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 315 Social Work Practice with Groups

    admission to the BSW program.

    Offers basic principles of group interventions with a generalist practice foundation. Contrasts groups with other forms of social work practice. Reviews skills required to conduct clinical and task groups. Emphasizes cultural diversity and ethical parameters when offering group services.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • SWK 325 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I

    admission to the BSW program; PSY 121 and SOC 150 or concurrent enrollment in PSY 121 and SOC 150.

    An introduction to the dynamics of human behavior and the effects of the social environment on the development of individuals and families.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 326 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II

    admission to the BSW program; and SWK 325.

    Exploration of a broad systems' approach to the generalist practice of social work. Focuses on the theories that support social work practice with groups, organizations, and communities.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • SWK 330 Social Work Practice with Addictions

    Examinations of the problems related to substance use disorders and other addiction issues. Areas of study broadly include definitions, prevalence, etiology, policies, effects on family and society, and prevention and treatment approaches.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 365 Families in Later Life

    PSY 121; and CFD 155 or CFD 163 or 30 hours.

    Examination of the structure and function of families in later life. Topics of interest include demographic trends impacting the structure of the family, marriage, sibling relations, parent-adult child relations, grandparenthood, widowhood, and retirement. The application of family theories and their relevance to later life families will be discussed. Identical with CFD 365, GER 366, and PSY 366. Can only receive credit for one of the following: CFD 365, GER 366, PSY 366 or SWK 365.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 370 Child Welfare Services

    Develop beginning competence in assessing types and benefits of different child welfare services, (i.e., foster care, adoptions, institutionalization); examination of the impact of public policies and social work practice on children and families.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 375 Social Work Perspectives with Latino/a Communities

    This course focuses on providing services to Spanish-speaking communities, with historical context for understanding current social, health, economic, political, and legal issues facing the population. Strategies for serving individuals and families through culturally and linguistically appropriate services will be presented in class. A strengths perspective will be offered to identify alternative service frameworks for addressing contemporary barriers to health and social services.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 397 Special Topics

    permission of instructor.

    Selected topics of contemporary interest in social work such as changing social welfare policy, specialized fields of social work, models of practice and future trends in social work. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours as topics change.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • SWK 418 Methods of Social Research in Social Work Practice

    admission to the BSW program; SWK 307 and SWK 326; and one of the following statistics courses: SOC 220, PSY 200, IPE 381, AGR 330, MTH 340, QBA 237, SPR 328, or concurrent enrollment.

    The application and use of the social scientific method for conducting research and applying research to social work practice including, but not limited to, single subject research design, treatment intervention evaluation, and program evaluation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 420 Social Work Practice with Families

    admission to the BSW program; and SWK 307 and SWK 326.

    Offers basic principles of family interventions with a generalist practice foundation. Contrasts families with other forms of social work practice. Overviews skills needed to work with families. Emphasizes cultural diversity and ethical parameters when offering family services.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 430 Social Work Practice in Communities and Organizations

    admission to the BSW program; and SWK 307 and SWK 326.

    Problem assessment and practice interventions with macrosystems. Examines strategies and techniques for social work practice with organizations and communities.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 470 Community Resources for Older Adults

    PSY 121.

    Covers the services, programs and institutions involved in providing services to older adults in the United States, with a focus on community-based services. Typical needs, issues, concerns and desires of older persons are identified and corresponding community-based services to address these needs are discussed. Emerging issues and developments in the field of gerontology will also be discussed as they relate to community services and resources. Site visits to agencies and organizations serving older adults will enhance students' familiarity with resources to improve the quality of life and well-being of aging members in our society. Identical with GER 470. Cannot receive credit for both SWK 470 and GER 470.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 480 Social Work Integrative Seminar

    admission to the BSW program; and SWK 418 and SWK 420 and SWK 430; and concurrent enrollment in SWK 490.

    In conjunction with SWK 490, this course satisfies the Public Affairs Capstone Experience. Examines student experiences, problems, and questions related to the practicum. Integrates theory, knowledge, social work values and skills from previous social work courses to prepare generalist social work practitioners. Failure to pass this course will result in failure to pass SWK 490. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • SWK 490 Practicum in Social Work

    admission to the BSW program; and SWK 418 and SWK 420 and SWK 430; and concurrent enrollment in SWK 480.

    In conjunction with SWK 480, this course satisfies the Public Affairs Capstone Experience. An educationally directed social work practice experience with individuals, groups, families, communities and organizations in a social service agency. Students are required to complete a minimum of 400 hours. Failure to pass this course will result in failure to pass SWK 480. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    932Spring
  • SWK 496 Directed Readings in Social Work

    6 hours of social work and permission.

    Readings designed to supplement material introduced in previous social work courses. Includes a wide selection from literature in the field. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • SWK 502 Rural Health

    junior standing.

    This course offers a study of health care delivery in rural communities. It includes theoretical foundations, cultural considerations and specific characteristics of rural environments and people. Local and international perspectives will be explored. This course has a community experience component. Identical with NUR 502. Cannot receive credit for both SWK 502 and NUR 502. May be taught concurrently with SWK 602. Cannot receive credit for both SWK 502 and SWK 602.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • SWK 543 Non-Profit Management in the Health and Human Services

    The purpose of this course is to lay a leadership and management foundation for those in social work and the human services professions from the nonprofit/social or public sectors. The history and scope of the U.S. nonprofit sector, as well as contemporary theories of nonprofit enterprise, governance and leadership, ethics, marketing, advocacy techniques, decision-making models and current ideas about possible futures for the sector will be presented. Students will leave the course with a solid understanding of nonprofit /social sector organization, and develop an understanding of his or her management style and philosophy. May be taught concurrently with SWK 643. Cannot receive credit for both SWK 543 and SWK 643.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • SWK 595 Grant Writing in the Health and Human Services

    This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding grant writing and how health and human service professionals can collaborate for successful proposal writing. Course will focus on practical skills needed to develop proposals, budgets, and evaluation plans. Attention will be given to preparing a competitive grant proposal. This course will cover the basics of proposals - purpose statements, background and justification, aims or objectives, personnel, time line, methods, budget, and evaluation, and how to effectively manage grants once they are funded. Grant writing is related to health and human services that stress access to and availability of resources. The needs of culturally diverse groups or communities will be discussed in this course, along with the particulars of proposals that may be most effective in meeting such needs. May be taught concurrently with SWK 644. Cannot receive credit for both SWK 595 and SWK 644.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • SWK 597 Special Topics

    junior standing.

    Selected topic of advanced content in social work, relevant to fields of practice or practice methodologies. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours as topics change. May be taught concurrently with SWK 699. Cannot receive credit for both SWK 597 and SWK 699.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • SWK 599 Health Literacy in the Human Services

    This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding functional health literacy and how the public's literacy skills affect interactions with health and human services professionals. Includes an examination of the data for national and international literacy levels and populations at risk for low literacy; research on health literacy; assessment tools; and practical techniques for addressing literacy issues in spoken and written communications at the practitioner and organizational levels. Identical with BMS 599 and IPE 599; may be taught concurrently with SWK 696 or PBH 699. Can only receive credit for one of the following: BMS 599, IPE 599, SWK 599, SWK 696, or PBH 699.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • SWK 602 Rural Health

    This course offers a study of health care delivery in rural communities. It includes theoretical foundations, cultural considerations and specific characteristics of rural environments and people. Local and international perspectives will be explored. This course has a community experience component. Identical with NUR 632. Cannot receive credit for both NUR 632 and SWK 632. May be taught concurrently with SWK 502. Cannot receive credit for both SWK 502 and SWK 602.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • SWK 643 Non-Profit Management in the Health and Human Services

    The purpose of this course is to lay a leadership and management foundation for those in social work and the human services professions from the nonprofit/social or public sectors. The history and scope of the U.S. nonprofit sector, as well as contemporary theories of nonprofit enterprise, governance and leadership, ethics, marketing, advocacy techniques, decision-making models and current ideas about possible futures for the sector will be presented. Students will leave the course with a solid understanding of nonprofit /social sector organization, and develop an understanding of his or her management style and philosophy. May be taught concurrently with SWK 543. Cannot receive credit for both SWK 543 and SWK 643.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • SWK 644 Grant Writing in the Health and Human Services

    This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding grant writing and how human service professionals can collaborate for successful proposal writing. Grant writing in the Health and Human Services will focus on practical skills needed to develop proposals, budgets, and evaluation plans. Attention will be given to preparing a competitive grant proposal. Grant writing is related to human services that stress access to and availability of resources. The needs of culturally diverse groups or communities will be discussed in this course, along with the particulars of proposals that may be most effective in meeting such needs. May be taught concurrently with SWK 595. Cannot receive credit for both SWK 595 and SWK 644.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • SWK 696 Health Literacy in the Human Services

    This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding functional health literacy and how the public's literacy skills affect interactions with health and human services professionals. Includes an examination of the data for national and international literacy levels and populations at risk for low literacy; research on health literacy; assessment tools; and practical techniques for addressing literacy issues in spoken and written communications at the practitioner and organizational levels. Identical with PBH 699; may be taught concurrently with SWK 599 or PBH 699. Can only receive credit for one of the following: IPE 599, SWK 599, SWK 696, or PBH 699.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • SWK 699 Special Topics

    Selected topic of advanced content in social work, relevant to fields of practice or practice methodologies. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours as topics change. May be taught concurrently with SWK 597. Cannot receive credit for both SWK 597 and SWK 699.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • SWK 705 Human Behavior in the Social Environment

    admission to MSW program.

    Content on life span development and the influence of various systems on the individual.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • SWK 710 Generalist Social Work Practice with Individuals

    admission to MSW program.

    Within a generalist framework, course provides an ethically-based, theory-driven, culturally competent approach to delivering professional social work services to individuals with varied issues and practice settings.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • SWK 715 Social Welfare Policy and Services

    admission to MSW program or permission.

    Covers the historical development, philosophical orientation, and analysis of social welfare policy and services in the United States. Examines social welfare policy in multiple areas.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • SWK 725 Generalist Social Work Practice with Families and Groups

    admission to MSW program.

    Within a generalist framework, this course focuses on basic skills and concepts related to social work practice with groups and families. Topics include group facilitation process and tasks, contrast between non-kin groups and family sessions, and strategies for working with families.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • SWK 726 Generalist Social Work Practice with Communities and Organizations

    admission to MSW program.

    Uses social work methods to focus on the dynamics associated with organizational and community generalist practice. This course provides a knowledge base (i.e., theory, research, and practice wisdom), values, and practice skills for the generalist social work profession. Concentration will be on social work practice occurring with organizations and communities.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • SWK 730 Diversity and Social Justice

    admission to the MSW program or permission of school.

    Using a social work strengths perspective and the ecological system theory, the course explores multiple dimensions and intersectionality of diversity, and social, economic, and environmental justice in a pluralistic and increasingly globalized society.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • SWK 735 Clinical Interventions with Weight Concerns

    The purpose of this course is to recognize the role weight bias and disordered eating plays in social work practice. It includes learning the background of weight stigma, understanding the anti-fat phobia movement, and how disordered eating is diagnosed and treated. Students will leave this course with a solid awareness of weight-based discrimination and how to integrate weight-inclusive practices.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • SWK 736 Trauma-Informed Social Work Practice

    This course is designed to examine social work skills and provide a framework for practice with individuals, families, organizations, and communities who are coping with trauma. Trauma is surrounded by a complex set of issues that will be addressed, including treatment choices, sociocultural forces that shape care provision and coping, multicultural perspectives on trauma, psychosocial challenges, and secondary stresses connected with this type of work.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Summer, Upon demand
  • SWK 737 Grief and Loss Across the Life Span

    admission into the MSW program.

    Issues pertaining to loss and grief are core in nearly every clinical situation that social workers address. Loss occurs throughout the life cycle. The course will start with an overview of loss as a normal and necessary part of life and growth. Loss and grief issues include but are not limited to dying and bereavement. Issues such as divorce, loss of a job, effects of a disaster, declines in functional health, acute illnesses, and chronic and life-threatening diseases are all examples of losses other than death. This course will focus on the experiences of loss, grief, and bereavement as it is viewed by individuals, families, and loved ones.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Summer
  • SWK 742 Substance Use and Social Work Practice

    This course provides an opportunity for the students to understand the problems of alcohol and drug use and dependence, and the impact on individuals, families, and the broader community.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • SWK 743 Management and Program Development in Human Service

    Develop knowledge and skills for effective supervisors and administrators in human service organizations. Students will also learn grant proposal writing and develop an understanding of their management style and philosophy.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • SWK 745 Regular Practicum I

    admission to MSW program; and field coordinator approval; and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, all other generalist courses.

    Students integrate Generalist level competencies with supervised experiences at a community agency. Students must complete 400 hours in placement; required practicum liability insurance is included in the supplemental course fee.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    7Spring
  • SWK 747 Regular Seminar I

    admission to MSW program; and field coordinator approval; and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, all other generalist courses.

    Seminar class with practicum supervision enhances the student's application of all previous generalist coursework with seminar assignments and activities of the practicum experience

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    2Spring
  • SWK 748 Extended Practicum I

    admission to MSW program; and practicum coordinator approval; and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, all other generalist courses.

    Students integrate generalist level competencies with supervised experiences at a community agency. Students must complete 400 hours in placement; required practicum liability insurance is included in the supplemental course fee. May be repeated to a maximum of seven hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    7Spring, Summer
  • SWK 749 Extended Seminar I

    admission to MSW program; and practicum coordinator approval; and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, all other generalist courses.

    Seminar class with practicum supervision enhances the student's application of all previous generalist coursework with seminar assignments and activities of the practicum experience. May be repeated to a maximum of two hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    2Spring, Summer
  • SWK 750 Social Work Practice I: Advanced Generalist Practice with Individuals

    admission to MSW program; and Advanced Standing or completion of all foundation coursework.

    This advanced practice course provides students with theories and skills for working with individuals from an advanced generalist perspective. By the end of the course, students will demonstrate ethically based, culturally informed practice with individuals.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Summer
  • SWK 754 Advanced Clinical Social Work Assessment

    admission to MSW program.

    Examines advanced topics related to individual and family-based assessment. Students deepen critical thinking as advanced generalist practitioners, learn when to use various clinical assessment tools (e.g., DSM), and develop skills in data collection, organization, and interpretation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • SWK 755 Social Work Practice II: Advanced Generalist Practice with Families

    admission to MSW program.

    This advanced practice course provides students with theories and skills for working with families from an advanced generalist perspective. By the end of the course, students will demonstrate ethically based, culturally informed practice with families.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • SWK 756 Social Work Practice III: Advanced Generalist Practice with Groups

    SWK 754 and SWK 755; and admission to MSW program.

    This advanced practice course provides students with theories and skills for working with groups from an advanced generalist perspective. By the end of the course, students will demonstrate ethically based, culturally informed practice with groups.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • SWK 757 Social Work Practice IV: Advanced Generalist Practice with Communities and Organizations

    SWK 755; and admission to MSW program.

    This advanced practice course provides students with theories, knowledge, and skills for evidence-informed practice with communities and organizations from an advanced generalist perspective. By the end of the course, students will demonstrate ethically based, culturally informed practice with communities and organizations and be able to apply ethical research principles to research methodology, design, and analysis to make evidence-informed recommendations that shape advanced generalist social work practice.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • SWK 760 Advanced Policy and Social Justice

    admission to MSW program.

    Students examine policies that affect client systems, and how these policies translate into programs and delivery systems in the United States and other countries. The course expands knowledge of the interrelatedness of diversity, policy, human rights and social justice.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • SWK 780 Regular Practicum II

    admission to MSW program; and permission of practicum coordinator; and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, all other advanced generalist courses

    Students integrate advanced generalist level competencies with supervised experiences at a community agency. Students must complete 500 hours in placement; required practicum liability insurance is included in the supplemental course fee

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    8Spring
  • SWK 781 Regular Seminar II

    admission to MSW program; and permission of field coordinator; and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, all other advanced generalist courses.

    Seminar class with practicum supervision enhances the student's application of all previous advanced generalist coursework with seminar assignments and activities of the practicum experience.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    22Spring
  • SWK 782 Extended Practicum II

    admission to MSW program; and permission of practicum coordinator; and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, all other advanced generalist courses.

    Students integrate advanced generalist level competencies with supervised experiences at a community agency. Students must complete 500 hours in placement; required practicum liability insurance is included in the supplemental course fee. Students integrate advanced generalist level competencies with supervised experiences at a community agency. May be repeated to a maximum of eight hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-8Spring, Summer
  • SWK 783 Extended Seminar II

    admission to MSW program; and permission of practicum coordinator; and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, all other advanced generalist courses.

    Seminar class with practicum supervision enhances the student's application of all previous specialist coursework with seminar assignments and activities of the practicum experience. May be repeated to a maximum of two hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-2Spring, Summer