Job Family 4 Job Evaluation Plan

MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES

JOB EVALUATION MANUAL8/13/07

Revised 7/3/2007 Factor V
8/8/07 Factor II
8/22/07 Factor I
9/17/07
Removed degree level titles
11/6/07
Added job evaluation points

This guide describes the point-factor job evaluation system used to evaluate those individuals working in executive, managerial, administrative, professional and paraprofessional jobs at Missouri State University.

JOB FAMILY 4
Executive and Managerial Employees, Administrative Employees, Professional and Paraprofessional Employees

This job evaluation plan incorporates some compensable factors, factor definitions, degree level descriptions, and other language included in and/or derived from the Department of Labor’s Guide for Evaluating Your Firm’s Jobs and Pay and the Office of Personnel Management’s Introduction to Position Classification Standards. Complete citations can be found below:

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2003). National compensation survey: Guide for evaluating your firm’s jobs and pay (DOL Publication).                 Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

U.S. Office of Personnel Management. (1995). Introduction to the position classification standards (Publication No. TS-134). Washington,         D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

 Job Family 4, Factor I: Professional Knowledge, Skill, and Technical Mastery (revised 8/22/07)

The level of professional knowledge, specialized skills, and technical mastery one must possess in order to adequately perform the job. This includes the specific knowledge of the principles and methods of occupations and professions, the understanding of specific procedures, steps, practices, concepts and techniques of the organization, and the skill or ability necessary to apply the bodies of knowledge, principles, methods, procedures, practices and techniques.

Professional knowledge, skill and technical mastery are acquired through a combination of formal training and related job experience. This factor defines professional knowledge, skill and technical mastery based on the level and specificity of educational requirements of the position and the amount and type of experience required by the job. The analyst must, however, exercise judgment in evaluating each job by carefully examining the job descriptions and using the following decision rules:
  • In general, job content determines the value of the job. Job content requiring very specific and/or more advanced professional and technical educational requirements, such as those that require a degree in a specific technical or professional field such as accounting, computer science, finance or engineering are more highly valued in the labor market, and command a higher factor level rating than jobs that have only a general, non-specific degree requirement or a requirement for a specific degree in a non-technical or non-professional field.
  • The value of the experience requirement varies depending on both the amount of experience (in years) required and the type of experience required. When the job description demands more specific experience and/or experience in a particular skill, the value of the experience may be greater than where the job description specifies only general experience or generally related experience. In many cases, knowledge acquired through extensive experience may compensate for a lower level of formal education.
  • In general, requirements for administrative or managerial experience infer a higher knowledge requirement and should be rated at a higher level than a similar length of general experience in a professional or technical knowledge area.
The examples that follow each factor are characteristic examples of levels of knowledge consistent with a factor level that the analyst can use as comparisons to anchor the scale. While professional knowledge, skill and technical mastery are acquired through formal training and job experience, no set of decision rules can specify the exact educational and experience requirements that satisfy a particular level’s criteria. The analyst must exercise considerable judgment in examining each job, its task requirements and specifications, make comparisons to other jobs, and use the job context to determine the most appropriate level of knowledge to assign to a job.
0. 300 points: Entry-level general knowledge of processes, methods and procedures that can be obtained through on-the-job training in one or more simple work processes. Knowledge permits the employee to complete less demanding, related, and recurring assignments that can be quickly mastered and/or to assist experienced coworkers.
Knowledge and skill at this level are typically acquired through on-the-job training and a combination of a high school diploma and previous work experience or some college coursework or vocational training. Consistent with this level are job requirements that include:
  • A high school diploma and work experience
  • Some college coursework or vocational training and work experience
  • An Associate’s degree and no experience
  • An equivalent combination of education, training and/or experience

1. 500 points: Knowledge of principles, processes, methods and procedures associated with a limited range of health care, technical, scientific, administrative support, communications or social science program objectives or common problems. Knowledge permits the employee to complete routine medical and healthcare procedures, common administrative support tasks, operate basic equipment and instruments, carry out a variety of interrelated tasks and recurring assignments, assist individuals seeking assistance, answer common questions, and/or elicit information from a variety of sources.

Professional knowledge, skill, and technical mastery at this level are typically acquired through a combination of formal education and/or training and experience beyond the high school diploma. Consistent with this level are job requirements that include:

  • Specific college course work or vocational training with one to two years of related work experience
  • An Associate’s degree with one to two years of related work experience
  • The requirement for an unspecified Bachelor’s degree with one year of experience or less
  • An equivalent combination of education, training, and/or experience

2. 900 points: Entry-level professional knowledge of the principles, concepts, practices and methods of non-technical administrative and managerial functions. Knowledge permits the employee to carry out basic recurring tasks and routine portions of assignments or to carry out less demanding professional elements of assignments in areas including communications, social sciences, art and design, education and related functions while gaining familiarity with the University’s policies and goals, business practices and/or accounting systems. This level of knowledge permits the employee to schedule and carry out the steps of a limited operation or project or to complete stages of a multi-phase project.

Knowledge at this level is typically acquired through a combination of formal education and/or training and experience that includes a requirement for a college degree in an unspecified field or a specific background in a non-technical area. Knowledge requirements may also include a limited amount of related work experience. Consistent with this level are job requirements that include:

  • An unspecified Bachelor’s degree and at least one and up to two years of related work experience required
  • A Bachelor’s degree in the social sciences, art and design, music, communications or education with up to two years of related work experience required
  • An unspecified Master’s degree requirement with an experience requirement of one year or less
  • An equivalent combination of education, training, and/or experience

3. 1500 points: Entry-level knowledge of the principles, concepts, practices and methods of an administrative, managerial, technical or professional specialty. Knowledge permits employee to carry out basic recurring tasks and routine portions of assignments or to carry out less demanding professional elements of assignments in professional or technical areas including accounting or auditing, financial management, business administration, human resources, law, engineering, science, or medicine, while gaining familiarity with the University’s policies and goals, business practices, and/or accounting systems. This level of knowledge permits the employee to schedule and carry out the steps of a limited operation or project, or to complete stages of a multi-phase project. Alternatively, knowledge at this level might also permit the employee to carry out recurring tasks and routine assignments requiring moderate experience in specific areas within higher education.

Knowledge at this level is typically acquired through a combination of formal education and/or training and experience that includes a requirement for a college degree in a specific technical or professional specialty. Knowledge requirements may also include a limited amount of related work experience. Alternatively, equivalent knowledge requirements at this level include a non-technical or general Bachelor’s degree requirement with a moderate level of additional related work experience or a non-specific Master’s degree requirement with some related work experience. Examples of knowledge levels consistent with this level are job requirements that include:

  • A Bachelor’s degree in accounting, finance or business administration with up to one year of related work experience
  • A Bachelor’s degree in engineering, computer science or natural sciences, with up to one year of related work experience
  • A Bachelor’s degree in nursing or medical arts with up to one year of related work experience
  • A Bachelor’s degree in the social sciences, art and design, music, communications, or education with at least two, but less than five, years of related experience required
  • An unspecified Bachelor’s degree and at least two, but less than five, years of related experience required
  • A Master’s degree in a non-specific or general area and at least one, and up to three, year(s) of related work experience
  • A Master’s degree in a specific non-technical area with one year of experience
  • An equivalent combination of education, training, and/or experience

4. 2300 points: Knowledge of the principles, concepts, practices, methods and techniques of an administrative, managerial or professional field such as accounting or auditing, financial management, business administration, human resources, engineering, social sciences, communications, education, law or medicine. Knowledge permits the employee to complete assignments by applying established methods to recurring types of projects/problems susceptible to well-documented precedents or to schedule, plan, and carry out precedented projects. Alternatively, knowledge at this level might also permit the employee to carry out precedented projects requiring considerable experience in specific areas in higher education.

Knowledge at this level typically requires a college degree and may require additional training beyond the Bachelor’s degree. Knowledge requirements generally also include a significant amount of related work experience, and may include administrative or supervisory experience.

Knowledge at this level is typically acquired through a combination of formal education and/or training and experience that includes a requirement for a college degree in a specific technical or professional specialty along with significant related work experience. Alternatively, equivalent knowledge requirements at this level include a non-technical or general Bachelor’s degree requirement with substantial work experience or a non-specific Master’s degree requirement with substantial work experience. Consistent with this level are job requirements that include:

  • A Bachelor’s degree in accounting, finance or business administration with at least one, and up to five, year(s) of related work experience
  • A Bachelor’s degree in engineering, computer science or natural sciences with at least one, and up to five, year(s) of related work experience
  • A Bachelor’s degree in nursing or medical arts with at least one, and up to five, year(s) of related work experience
  • A Bachelor’s degree in the social sciences, art and design, music, communications or education with at least five years of related work experience required
  • An unspecified Bachelor’s degree and at least five years of related work experience required
  • A Master’s degree in a non-specific or a general area and at least three years of related work experience
  • A Master’s degree in a specific non-technical area with more than one year of related work experience
  • A Master’s degree in a professional or technical area with at least one, and up to three, year(s) of related work experience
  • An equivalent combination of education, training, and/or experience

5. 3300 points: Knowledge of the principles and methods of an administrative, managerial or professional field such as accounting or auditing, financial management, information technology, business administration, human resources, engineering, law, social sciences, communications, education or medicine. Knowledge permits the employee to supervise projects and/or departments using standard methods to improve administrative and/or line operations. Knowledge also permits employee to plan steps and carry out multi-phase projects requiring problem definition and modified techniques, to coordinate work with others, and to modify methods and procedures to solve a wide variety of problems.

Knowledge at this level requires a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree with substantial related work experience, including up to two years of administrative or supervisory experience. Alternatively, this level may require a professional or clinical degree beyond the Bachelor’s degree with moderate related work experience; knowledge requirements include significant levels of related work experience. Consistent with this level are job requirements that include:

  • A Bachelor’s degree in accounting, finance or business administration with five years or more of related work experience including some supervisory or administrative experience
  • A Bachelor’s degree in engineering, computer science or natural sciences with five years or more of related work experience including some supervisory or administrative experience
  • A non-specific Bachelor’s degree or a Bachelor’s degree in the social sciences, art and design, music, communications or education with more than five years of experience and significant administrative, managerial or higher education experience
  • A Master’s degree in a non-specific or general area or a specified non-technical area with at least five years of related work experience including some supervisory or administrative experience
  • A Master’s degree in a professional or technical area with at least three years of related work experience
  • A clinical doctorate, J.D. or Ed.D. with one to four years of related experience
  • An equivalent combination of education, training, and/or experience

6. 4500 points: Knowledge of a wide range of concepts, principles and methods of an administrative, academic, managerial or professional field. Knowledge permits the employee to develop new or substantially modified approaches that diverge from standard methods to improve administrative and/or line operations. Knowledge also permits the employee to plan steps and carry out multi-phase projects requiring problem definition and modified techniques, to coordinate work with others, and to modify methods and procedures to solve a wide variety of problems. Knowledge requirements may include evidence of the ability to manage programs and/or lead and direct other professionals.

Knowledge requirements for jobs at this level typically include a level of education beyond the Bachelor’s degree with comprehensive related work experience, frequently including substantial administrative or supervisory experience, and knowledge of higher education processes, policies and procedures. Alternatively, this level may require a professional or clinical specialty beyond the Bachelor’s with moderate related work experience. The knowledge requirement at this level may also include a terminal academic degree with an appropriate level of leadership and/or administrative experience. Consistent with this level are job requirements that include:

  •  The requirement for an MBA with five or more years of progressively responsible administrative experience
  • A Master’s degree with five to ten years experience in a specific area of higher education
  • A J.D. with at least five years of higher education and/or professional experience
  • A clinical doctorate with at least five years of clinical or administrative experience
  • An Ed.D. with at least five years of administrative experience
  • An unspecified Ph.D. in any academic area with several years of experience, including some level of leadership and/or administrative experience within a university setting
  • An equivalent combination of education, training, and/or experience

7. 5900 points: Mastery of the concepts, principles and methods of an administrative, managerial or professional field. Knowledge permits the employee to solve difficult or unusual systematic problems characterized by their breadth and importance. Knowledge permits the employee to analyze and integrate diverse technical approaches in identifying and solving multifaceted or controversial problems that require the development and use of new methods. Knowledge permits the employee to exercise leadership, to plan and lead projects, and provide authoritative guidance to staff members, managers and other subordinates. Alternatively, knowledge permits the employee to solve complex problems in specific professional areas involving the complex integration and application of a body of knowledge acquired through years of study and experience.

Knowledge at this level typically requires an advanced terminal degree, including an earned Ph.D. or M.D. Jobs at this level require the highest levels of work experience, including a very substantial record of progressively responsible leadership that includes high-level administrative or managerial experience, advanced knowledge of, and experience in, higher education processes, policies and procedures. Alternatively, this level may require advanced skill in a specific technical or professional area requiring a Ph.D. or M.D. with a moderate level of field experience. Consistent with this level are job requirements that include:

  • A nonspecific earned Ph.D. and five years of progressively responsible experience in administrative or leadership positions in higher education
  • An M.D. with experience in the general practice of medicine
  • An earned Ph.D. in a specific technical field such as business, engineering or medicine with experience in the administration of specific programs, centers or projects
  • An equivalent combination of education, training, and/or experience

Job Family 4, Factor II: Supervisory Responsibility [revised 8-7-07]

The degree of supervisory responsibility is defined by the extent of supervisory responsibilities required by the job and the types and numbers of employees being supervised. When evaluating jobs using this factor consider:

The range of managerial/supervisory tasks performed. Higher levels of this factor require a full range of managerial/supervisory tasks, including performance management and dealing with employee rights and responsibilities.

The number and level of employees supervised. Higher levels of this factor involve managing employees who are professionals, managers and/or supervisors of other employees. At higher levels, more time is spent on managerial/supervisory work and less time is spent on operational activities.

Factor levels include:

1. 50 points: Typically, little, if any, supervision of others is required. The job may require irregular but occasional responsibility to direct the work of student workers and/or temporary or part-time workers. The nature of supervision is largely confined to assigning tasks to others and does not include a full range of supervisory responsibilities. The amount of time spent on directing the work of others is normally a small portion of total work time.

2. 130 points: Regular, but limited, supervision, training or directing the work assignments of (a) small numbers of student, part-time, or temporary workers, or (b) one or more permanent, full-time employee(s). The nature of supervision is largely confined to scheduling work and assigning tasks. Supervision at this level typically does not include a full range of supervisory responsibilities, and supervisory duties typically do not consume a large portion of the work day. Examples of this level would be an employee who directs the activities of a graduate assistant and two student workers, a work team leader who assigns tasks to three junior workers, or a professional employee who assigns work to an administrative assistant and a junior researcher.

3. 270 points: Supervision of a limited number of (a) operative, administrative support, or paraprofessional employees who do not exercise a full range of supervisory responsibilities over other full-time employees, (b) a very small number of professional employees, or an equivalent combination of (a) and (b). The incumbent performs a full range of supervisory responsibilities, including performance reviews of subordinates. The incumbent is generally responsible for training, planning and directing the work of permanent employees, and provides major input into hiring decisions. Supervisory responsibilities consume moderate amounts of work time and may include general work planning tasks. Many first-line supervisors or office managers in smaller units are at this level. Characteristic of this level would be an office leader who supervises two administrative assistants and one subordinate professional, or a program director who has one administrative support subordinate and three field professionals.

4. 470 points: Supervision of (a) a moderate number of operative, administrative support or paraprofessional employees who do not exercise a full range of supervisory responsibilities over other full-time employees, (b) a small number of professional employees who exercise limited supervision of others, or (c) large numbers of student workers or graduate assistants, or some equivalent combination of the above. The incumbent performs a full range of supervisory responsibilities, including performance reviews of subordinates. The incumbent is responsible for training, planning and directing the work of permanent employees, and generally controls hiring decisions. Supervisory responsibilities consume moderate amounts of work time and may include general work planning tasks. Many first-line supervisors or office managers are at this level. Examples would include an office manager who supervises an office with an administrative assistant, three administrative specialists, two GA’s and a student employee, a director who supervises an administrative assistant and four professional field staff, or a supervisor who oversees a work crew of four classified staff and eight student employees.

5. 730 points: Supervision of (a) several work teams or work team leaders, (b) a rather large group of operative, administrative support, or paraprofessional employees, (c) a work group involving direction of skilled technical employees, (d) professionals in technical and skilled areas, and/or (e) subordinate supervisory personnel. The incumbent performs a full range of supervisory responsibilities, including the authority to hire, train, transfer, promote, reward or discipline others. Supervision will likely be general rather than close supervision of others. At this level, supervisory responsibilities consume significant amounts of work time, and include substantial responsibility for work planning activities, staffing and performance management, as well as budgeting and planning functions. Typical of this level would be managers who supervise very large departments with multiple professional and/or managerial employees, or those in units with multiple programs and professional staff.

6. 1050 points: General administration of a large unit or multiple units of employees where the nature of the managerial work involves providing general direction for other managerial personnel. Managers at this level have substantial responsibility for the operation of a functional unit, including responsibility for the budgeting process, budgetary and inventory control, purchasing and regulatory compliance, as well as administrative authority over staffing issues and disciplinary outcomes. General administrative work, rather than direct supervision of others, takes up rather large portions of work time. Typical of this level are those in charge of multiple functional areas, such as associate vice presidents or directors overseeing several departments.

7. 1430 points: General administration over multiple professional units where the nature of supervision involves providing administrative and/or strategic direction to other administrative personnel. Managers at this level have complete responsibility for the operation of several units, including responsibility for formulating and implementing unit strategic objectives, financial and budgetary control, and administrative control over staff. Those at this level would include the university’s most senior executives.

Job Family 4, Factor III: Interactions with Others

The types of contacts and interactions with others required by the job, defined in terms of the individuals and groups with whom the incumbent is required to interact, the nature and purpose of the exchange, and the skill required for the interaction.
1. 50 points: Interactions are typically limited to the immediate supervisor and work team. The nature of the interaction typically involves routine exchange of information or providing assistance to coworkers. Little or no contact with the general public, students or others outside one’s immediate work group is required.

2. 100 points: Interactions are generally routine and structured, involving employees inside the University, students or the general public. The purpose may include obtaining or clarifying facts, coordinating work, solving recurring problems or providing factual information to others. Contacts may be with co-workers or structured exchanges with students, faculty or the general public, and are generally for the purpose of exchanging information.

3. 250 points: The purpose of interactions is to advise or counsel others to solve recurring and structured problems, and/or to plan or coordinate work efforts with other employees who are working toward common goals in situations where relationships are generally cooperative. Interactions are moderately structured and routine, and may involve employees in different functions, students, and/or the general public. These types of interactions require normal interpersonal skills.

4. 500 points: Interactions with others are somewhat unstructured. The purpose may be to influence or motivate others, to obtain information or to control situations and resolve problems. Interactions may be with individuals or groups of co-workers, students or the general public, may be moderately unstructured, and may involve persons who hold differing goals and objectives. Individuals at this level often act as a liaison between groups with a focus on solving particular unstructured problems. Interactions at this level require considerable interpersonal skill and the ability to resolve conflict.

5. 850 points: Interactions are highly unstructured and incumbents are often required to resolve difficult and unstructured problems. Interactions are commonly with administrators, cost-center heads, high level committees or external constituents in order to defend, negotiate or resolve controversial and/or long-range issues and problems. Interactions occur in situations subject to divergent views, skepticism, resistance, uncooperative attitudes and conflicting objectives. Interactions often require high levels of interpersonal skill and require the ability to influence, interrogate, or control others through debate, persuasion, or authoritative recognition and require strong analytical and decision-making skills.

 

Job Family 4, Factor IV: Job Controls and Guidelines

How the work is controlled, including the nature of the guidelines received, the judgment needed to apply them, and the degree of personal control over actions taken. Guidelines include the degree to which specific oral or written instructions, including supervisory instructions, policy manuals, regulations, handbooks, standard operating procedures, etc., exist to guide the activities undertaken in the job. Job controls refer to the types of judgmental actions that can be taken and the degree to which personal control and freedom to select a course of action is constrained.
1. 100 points: The work generally involves sequential steps and methods explained by the supervisor and/or described by specific guidelines, such as standard operating procedures, handbooks and/or reference manuals. Tasks are relatively clear-cut and involve related steps, processes, and methods. The employee may be required to recognize differences in a variety of situations, but those differences are normally clear and require the selection of standard processes to resolve. Deviations from standard procedures or guidelines must be authorized.
2. 250 points: The employee carries out a group of procedures using the general methods and desired results indicated by the supervisor. Typically, standard operating procedures, handbooks and/or reference manuals exist for most procedures, but the employee must select from the most appropriate of several guidelines and make minor adjustments to methods. Unforeseen situations are normally referred to others for resolution. Assignments are related in function and objective, but processes, procedures or software varies from one assignment to another. Based on the assignment, the employee uses diverse, but conventional, methods, techniques or approaches. Employees in jobs at this level may perform work that is moderately complex, but normally performed within a fairly narrow and specific functional area.
3. 500 points: The employee operates under general supervision expressed in terms of program goals and objectives, priorities and deadlines. Administrative supervision is given through statements of overall program or project objectives and available resources. Administrative guidelines are relatively comprehensive, and the employee need only to fill in gaps in interpretation and adapt established methods to perform recurring activities. In unforeseen situations, the employee must interpret inadequate or incomplete guidelines, develop plans and initiate new methods to complete assignments based on those interpretations. Assignments are normally related in function, but the work requires many different processes and methods applied to an established administrative or professional field. Problems are typically the result of unusual circumstances, variations in approach, or incomplete or conflicting data. The employee must interpret and refine methods to complete assignments. Characteristic jobs at this level may involve directing single-purpose programs or performing complex, but precedented, technical or professional work.
4. 850 points: The employee operates under administrative supervision and makes decisions based on broadly-stated University objectives and available resources. Administrative guidelines are expressed in terms of project or program outcomes and deadlines, with few comprehensive guidelines. Decisions are based on inadequate guidelines that require considerable interpretation and force the employee to plan all phases of the assignment. Assignments may be unrelated in function, and the work requires many different processes and methods and a great deal of analysis to identify the nature and extent of problems. The work may require the employee to develop new methods and to deal with many variables, including some that are unclear or conflicting. Characteristic jobs at this level may involve directing large and/or complex programs, projects or departments in which the work cuts across functional lines or requires dealing with unprecedented issues.

5. 1300 points: Guidelines are broad and nonspecific. The employee works with only broad administrative and policy direction, and must make decisions based on knowledge of the University’s mission, strategic objectives and regulatory constraints. The employee defines administrative objectives, formulates and implements programs, and develops new methods or processes that have led to recognition as an authority in the area. The work requires many different processes and methods and a great deal of analysis to identify the nature and extent of problems, develop new methods, and deal with many variables, including some that are unclear or conflicting.

Job Family 4, Factor V: Managerial Responsibility

The managerial responsibility required by the job, defined in terms of the results and consequences of the activities required by the job, the degree to which various units within the University are affected by the results of the job’s activities and/or the level of financial or operational control required by the job.

1. 150 points: Work involves services including collecting, processing and disseminating information for others to use. Work activities may be complex and may affect the accuracy, reliability or acceptability of further processes or services, but typically involve providing information for others to use rather than requiring managerial decision-making on the part of the incumbent. Job activities typically have limited consequences for the department and relatively minor impact on the cost center. Jobs at this level typically involve no budgetary control, except for the normal responsibilities associated with monitoring and reporting every day expenses.

2. 400 points: Work involves services including collecting, processing, and disseminating information, and providing advice to others. Work activities may be complex and likely affect the accuracy, reliability or acceptability of further processes or services to the extent that others rely on the advice given in order to make decisions. Work activities typically affect the efficiency of the department, but have relatively minor effects on operations within the cost center. Individuals in jobs at this level are often responsible for actively documenting, monitoring and controlling expenditures. Incumbents may recommend minor expenditures, but have no substantive authority over budgets.

3. 850 points: Work involves providing significant support services to others, both within and outside of the department that substantially influences decision-making processes. Work activities are complex, and others rely on the accuracy and reliability of the information, analysis or advice to make decisions. Work activities have a direct, but shared, impact on further processes or services, affect the overall efficiency and image of the department, and may have material impact on costs or service quality within the cost center. Incumbents may be responsible for identifying areas of need and for developing proposals that request funding to fulfill those needs.

4. 1500 points: Work involves the primary accountability for a smaller department, program or process. Work activities involve managerial decisions that directly affect the efficiency, costs, reputation and service quality of the department, program, or process. Work affects a limited range of professional projects or administrative activities of the University. Work activities have a direct and substantial impact on the department. While work activities do have some effect on the efficiency and reputation of the cost center, departments, programs or processes at this level represent a relatively minor function within the cost center. Employees in jobs at this level may have responsibility for developing budgets, distributing budgeted funds and exercising the primary control over a relatively small budget.

5. 2350 points: Work involves primary accountability for a larger department, program or process. Work activities involve managerial decisions that directly affect the efficiency, costs, reputation and service quality of the department, program or process. Work affects a limited range of professional projects or administrative activities of the University, influences internal or external operations, or impacts students, faculty and/or staff. Work activities have a direct and significant impact on the department. Work activities also have a significant effect on the efficiency and reputation of the cost center and represent a relatively major function within the cost center. At this level would be jobs in which the incumbent may have responsibility for developing budgets, distributing budgeted funds and exercising primary control over a moderately-sized budget.

6. 3400 points: Work involves primary accountability for key end result areas including the major projects, processes or services of a cost center. Work activities affect a wide range of professional projects or administrative activities of the University, influence internal or external operations, and affect other administrators and a large number of students, faculty and/or staff. At this level, the incumbent may have primary authority for developing large budgets and distributing funds over a number of related functions.

7. 4650 points: At this level, the incumbent has the primary responsibility and key controlling impact for major University functions, projects and activities. Work activities affect the work of other administrators, influence professional or administrative activities of the University, and impact the well-being of many groups of people, including students, faculty and staff. At this level, the incumbent may have primary authority for developing very large budgets and distributing funds over a number of unrelated functions.

Job Family 4: Job Evaluation Worksheet 07/03/2007 (revised 8/22/07; revised, points added 11/06/07)

Job Title:          ____________________________________________        Job Code: __________         
Department:     ____________________________________________Date:_________________
Analyst:           ____________________________________________
 
Factor Levels and Points
Factor Title
0    300 points
1    500 points              
2    900 points              
3    1500 points            
4    2300 points             
5    3300 points             
6    4500 points             
7    5900 points

Factor I: Professional Knowledge, Skill, and Technical Mastery

Comments:

1   50 points

2    130 points
3    270 points
4    470 points
5    730 points
6    1050 points
7    1430 points

Factor II: Supervisory Responsibility

Comments:
1    50 points
2    100 points
3    250 points
4    500 points
5    850 points

Factor III: Interactions with Others

Comments:
1    100 points
2    250 points
3    500 points
4    850 points
5    1300 points

Factor IV: Job Controls and Guidelines

Comments:
1    150 points
2    400 points
3    850 points
4    1500 points
5    2350 points
6    3400 points
7    4650 points

Factor V: Managerial Responsibility

Comments:
Summary
Factor
Level
Points

Factor I: Professional Knowledge, Skill, and Technical Mastery

   

Factor II: Supervisory Responsibility

   

Factor III: Interactions with Others

   

Factor IV: Job Controls and Guidelines

   

Factor V: Managerial Responsibility

   
Total Point Value