Sociology, Anthropology and Gerontology Courses

Anthropology (ANT) courses

  • ANT 100 World Cultures

    General Education Course (Focus on Cultural Competence).

    An exploration of cultural differences throughout the world, with emphasis on nonwestern societies, from the perspective of cultural anthropology.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    330Fall, SpringANTH 201 - Cultural Anthropology.
  • ANT 125 Exploring Our Human Ancestry

    General Education Course (Focus on Social and Behavioral Sciences).

    This course explores what it means to be human by tracing our biological and cultural roots. Topics include the evolutionary process; our place among the living primates; fossil and archaeological evidence of human ancestors; and the origins of language, society, and culture.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    330Fall, SpringANTH 101 - General Anthropology.
  • ANT 303 Cultural Anthropology

    The comparative study of human society and culture, focusing on theories of culture and cultural institutions and ethnographic and cross-cultural methods of research.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    330Fall, SpringANTH 201 - Cultural Anthropology.
  • ANT 304 Biological Anthropology

    An examination of biological aspects of humanity from comparative and evolutionary perspectives. Topics include evolutionary theory, the origin and evolution of nonhuman primates and humans, primate behavior, biological variation among human populations, and anatomical and physiological influences on behavior.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • ANT 305 Introduction to Archaeology

    An introduction to the goals, methods, theories, issues, and ethics of archaeology-the study of cultures in the past from the remains they left behind. Topics will include archaeological survey, excavation, dating techniques, artifact analysis, conservation, and cultural adaptation and change.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • ANT 306 Linguistic Anthropology

    This course is an introduction to the field of linguistic anthropology, with special emphasis on language as a basic component of human culture. Subjects include the humanness of language, the study of linguistic structure, description and analysis of languages, origins of human speech, the history of languages and writing, the use of language in social relations, and the relationship among language, thought, and culture.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • ANT 309 Service-Learning in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: 30 hours and concurrent registration in an anthropology course designated as a service-learning offering.

    An integrative learning experience which addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs by incorporating community service with classroom instruction. Includes 40 hours on-task service to a community organization, agency or public sector provider. The community service placement agency and service assignment will vary, dependent on the disciplinary course topic and learning objectives. May be repeated.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1Fall, Spring
  • ANT 312 Anthropology of Gender

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or ANT 303 or permission of instructor.

    Theories, concepts, and case studies relating to the cultural and social construction of gender from an anthropological perspective. Students will examine gender in relation to sexuality, fertility, child-bearing, self-identification, family, power, status, voice, hegemony/resistance, colonialism, and globalization in cultures and societies around the world. Identical with AAS 312. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 312 and AAS 312.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 313 Volunteering and Development in the Global South: Anthropological Perspectives

    This course examines theories, concepts, underlying assumptions, and case studies about aid and other assistance to developing nations. It will consider the various meanings given to development by residents of particular regions, as well as those of aid workers, policy makers, private industries, non-governmental and non-profit organizations, and government officials. The course will examine how development projects and policies in areas such as public health and food systems are experienced in daily life in urban and rural areas in Africa, Latin American, and Asia. Students will develop critical thinking skills about the role of culture in the complex and diverse world of international aid.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 314 Environmental Anthropology

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or ANT 303.

    An introduction to the anthropological study of the dynamic relationship between humans and their environment. Students will learn how belief systems, political ideologies and religions around the world have shaped human-environment relationships.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 315 Anthropology of Globalization

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or ANT 303 or permission of instructor.

    This course critically examines the interconnected modern world using theories, methods, case studies, and concepts developed in cultural anthropology. Students will explore how economic exchanges, new media, human migration, knowledge flows, and other dimensions of globalization are variously experienced in diverse parts of the world by tracing global structures of power and mobility.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 316 Ends of Life

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or ANT 303 or permission of instructor.

    This course explores the social, cultural, and biological nature of human personhood in the context of death and dying. Students will examine anthropological literature that seeks to explain and interpret the tremendous cross-cultural variation in mortuary rituals and funerary behavior, the cultural construction of death, mourning and bereavement, and medical and ethical issues relating to death and dying. Students will also examine a variety of ways that U.S. society deals with death and dying today.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 317 Medical Anthropology

    An examination of health, illness and healing from an applied anthropological perspective, medical anthropology is one of the largest fields in the discipline of anthropology today, and one that has obvious applications. Topics may include: evolutionary perspectives on illness, the cultural construction of illness, cross-cultural variations in illness and healing, ethnomedical beliefs and practices, shamanism and other forms of symbolic healing, ethnobotany, and relations between biomedicine and ethnomedicine.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 318 Anthropology of Tourism

    Tourism is a huge, powerful, and problematic industry that is having profound effects on peoples and cultures around the globe today, particularly in societies traditionally studied by anthropologists. The anthropological study of tourism seeks to understand the motives and experiences of the tourist, the relationships between "hosts" and "guests", and the impacts of the industry on communities, cultures, and identities. This course pays particular attention to ethnic, cultural, and heritage tourism and to "best practices" that promote sustainable community development as well as social justice and cultural preservation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 320 Ethnography

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or ANT 303.

    In this course students will read, critique, and compare selected ethnographic accounts of societies around the world and explore ways in which anthropologists have written about and interpreted cultures.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 321 Ethnographic Field School

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or ANT 303; and permission.

    Field experience in the techniques, methods, and theories of ethnographic research within a community. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    3-6Upon demand
  • ANT 325 North American Indian Cultures

    Prerequisite: ANT 100 or ANT 303.

    A survey and comparison of Native American societies and cultures in North America (north of Mexico), including their ecology, subsistence, technology, social organization, politics, and religion.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 326 Plains Indian Cultures

    This course examines the origins, development, and traditional cultures of Native American groups in the North American Plains region. Topics will include the prehistoric record, historical influences, material culture, subsistence, languages, social organization, trade, law and social control, warfare and alliances, art and religion.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 327 North American Indians Today

    Focuses on major developments in North American Indian life in the 20th and 21st centuries, including cultural, social, economic, political, environmental, and legal issues that affect Native Americans today.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 330 Peoples and Cultures

    Anthropological study of a cultural region of the world (such as the Caribbean, Latin America, or Southeastern Indians), including environment, subsistence, technology, economy, social and political organization, and religion. Identical with AAS 330. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 330 and AAS 330. Variable content course. May be repeated when topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • ANT 332 Peoples and Cultures of Africa

    An exploration of African societies (especially sub-Saharan), including family structure, gender relations, social and political organization, beliefs, economics, art, oral literature, music, dance, and other aspects of culture. Identical with AAS 333. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 332 and AAS 333.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 334 Peoples and Cultures of Japan

    An anthropological survey of the culture and cultural development of the peoples of Japan, from prehistory to the present, including cultural ideology and ethos, social organization, major cultural principles, customs, religion, technology, material culture, and the arts.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 336 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America

    An overview of the peoples and cultures of Latin America. Explores culture, politics, economics, race, ethnicity, religion, gender, health, popular culture, social movements, environmental issues, and historical developments in Latin America from an anthropological perspective.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 338 Peoples and Cultures of Oceania

    An overview of the peoples and cultures of Oceania. Explores culture, politics, economics, race, ethnicity, religion, gender, health, popular culture, social movements, environmental issues, historical developments, and global positioning of the region from an anthropological perspective.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 340 Archaeology of Complex Societies

    Prerequisite: ANT 305 or permission of instructor.

    A detailed consideration of the archaeological study of complex societies, emphasizing the origins and development of social forms and institutions of the modern world such as social inequality, urbanism, and nation-states and empires. Case studies may be selected from Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and South America.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 342 Hunters and Gatherers

    Prerequisite: 30 hours or permission of instructor.

    Explores past and present hunter-gatherer (non-agricultural) societies through all subfields of anthropology, especially cultural anthropology and archaeology. Topics include subsistence, technology, gender, social organization, religion, environmental sustainability, the cultural sustainability of contemporary hunter-gatherers, popular stereotypes, and the history of anthropological approaches to hunter-gatherers. Uses case studies from diverse regions such as Australia, Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 345 Historical Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 305.

    Historical archaeology investigates the emergence of the modern world over the past ca. 500 years through the study of the material traces of human behavior, in conjunction with the study of written and oral records. This course provides an in-depth introduction to the field of historical archaeology including its methods, theoretical approaches, debates, and applications. Key topics include the historical archaeology of colonialism, slavery, class, gender, ethnicity, consumerism, capitalism, and industrialization. By the end of the course, students will understand how archaeologists recover, analyze, and interpret historical artifacts.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 347 Archaeology of the Southwest

    A broad introduction to the archaeology and the peoples, past and present, of the greater southwest. The course covers the history of archaeological research in the region, one of the most intensively studied in the world. It traces cultural developments from the earliest evidence of humans in the Americas in the late Pleistocene through the adoption of farming, the emergence of regional systems, the population movements that culminated in the formation of today's indigenous communities, and the major changes brought on by Spanish colonization and the eventual conquest of much of the region by the United States.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 351 Field Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 125 or ANT 305; and permission.

    Field experience in the techniques, methods and theories of reconnaissance and excavation of archaeological sites. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    3-6Upon demand
  • ANT 355 Environmental Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 305 or BIO 122 or GLG 110 or GLG 171 or GRY 108 or GRY 142.

    This course focuses on the archaeological study of human interactions with the environment over long periods of time and in multiple settings. It will emphasize both the methods scientists in multiple disciplines use to reconstruct past environments and the conceptual frameworks that are relevant to understanding how people acted on and reacted to the changing world around them. As a holistic and diachronic study of the socio-natural system, environmental archaeology can provide unique perspectives on today's ecological challenges.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 360 North American Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 305.

    Americanist archaeology is distinctive as a set of theoretical and methodological orientations. This course illustrates those orientations through archaeological case studies of initial human migrations, hunting-and-gathering societies, the formation of more complex polities, and European colonialism in North America. The multiple contexts of archaeological research and its impacts on living people are also considered.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 361 Research Methods in Biological Anthropology

    Prerequisite: ANT 304 or concurrent enrollment.

    A survey of techniques and materials used in biological anthropology. Course will cover the main areas of biological anthropology with a focus on hands-on learning activities in the realms of evolutionary theory, basic human genetics, primatology, human evolution, and forensic anthropology. Students will use the departmental collection of bones and fossil casts to become familiar with skeletal remains and the variability that exists in human and nonhuman primate populations, past and present.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 363 Survey of Forensic Anthropology

    A survey of the scope of forensic anthropology, which deals with identification and interpretation of human skeletal remains in medico-legal contexts. Included in this course are both theoretical and practical components. Topics to be discussed include the history and ethics of forensic anthropology, forensic investigation, influence of activity and disease on bone, and human rights applications. Practical aspects cover identification of bones and features of the human skeleton; techniques for determining age, sex, stature and race, and distinguishing human from nonhuman skeletal remains.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 365 Human Variation

    Prerequisite: ANT 304, or BIO 101 and 111, or BIO 121, or BMS 100 and 101, or BMS 110 and 111.

    An examination of ways in which humans have adapted both genetically and physiologically to a wide variety of environments and how these adaptations have produced the biological variation seen in contemporary human populations. Major topics will include historical and current approaches to classifying human groups, human growth and development, adaptation and acclimatization to specialized environments, genetic disease, and tracing lineages through DNA analysis. It will also explore recent studies relating human biology to social constructs such as gender, race, ethnicity, and intelligence.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 370 The Living Primates

    Prerequisite: ANT 304 or BIO 122 or PSY 336.

    An introduction to the human species' closest relatives, the nonhuman primates (prosimians, monkeys, and apes); their taxonomy, distribution, morphology, ecology, evolution, behavior, and conservation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 375 Human Evolution

    Prerequisite: ANT 304 or BIO 122.

    An exploration into the evolution of the human species, through examination of fossil and molecular evidence.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 380 Language and Culture

    Prerequisite: ANT 306 or ENG 296.

    Advanced study in linguistic anthropology on topics such as ethnographies of speaking, ethnolinguistics, language change and historical linguistics. Variable content course. May be repeated when topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • ANT 390 Native American Code Talkers

    This course explores the use of Native American languages in U.S. military service during World War I and World War II. The cultural background of code talkers, their recruitment, use in combat situations and post war experiences will be examined, along with their unique status in Native American cultures and recent efforts to document and recognize them.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    110Upon demand
  • ANT 395 History of Anthropological Theory

    Prerequisite: ANT 303 and 60 hours.

    This course traces the development of anthropology and anthropological theory, with emphasis on the major theorists and schools of thought in the twentieth century. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • ANT 397 Special Topics

    Selected topics such as primitive technology, cultural ecology and behavioral evolution. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours when topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • ANT 400 Action Anthropology

    A survey of social activism and advocacy in anthropology. Course will cover anthropological approaches to studying social problems, learning about the diverse perspectives of stakeholder communities, and working to resolve real world issues in an informed way. Includes issue-based discussions with local activists and a hands-on component focused on addressing local social issues.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 490 Field Experience in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Supervised group study and/or research in an off campus setting. A fee may be charged to cover travel expenses. Identical with AAS 490. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 490 and AAS 490. Variable content course. May be repeated when topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • ANT 499 Internship in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: 18 hours of ANT and permission of instructor.

    This independent study course provides an opportunity to earn academic credit for supervised work experience related to anthropology with an approved business, industry, organization, or government agency. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • ANT 500 Applied Cultural Anthropology

    Prerequisite: ANT 303 and 60 hours.

    An introduction to the field of applied anthropology, which is the application of anthropological methods, theories, and knowledge to the problems of society. Applied anthropology is the fastest growing field of anthropology today because it provides a basis for many careers. Course will examine the role of cultural anthropologists in areas such as foreign aid and development projects, migrant and refuge services, disasters and humanitarian assistance, human rights issues, business and industry, health and medicine, tourism, environmental protection, fisheries management, the military, and cultural preservation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 505 Ethnohistory

    Prerequisite: ANT 303 and 60 hours.

    The use of documents, maps, photos, recordings, oral histories, artifacts, folklore, linguistics, and ethnography to reconstruct the culture history of a social or ethnic group, particularly historically marginalized peoples such as Native Americans.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 511 Ethnographic Field Methods

    Prerequisite: ANT 303 and 60 hours.

    Ethnographic methods and techniques in the study of culture, with emphasis on participant-observation, interviewing, note-taking and management, data analysis, and ethics.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • ANT 545 Cultural Resource Management

    Prerequisite: 60 hours.

    An examination of laws and regulations pertaining to the preservation of American history and culture and the professional management and preservation of ethnic, historic, and prehistoric cultural resources. May be taught concurrently with ANT 645. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 545 and ANT 645.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • ANT 550 Advanced Methods in Archaeology

    Prerequisite: ANT 305 and 60 hours.

    Advanced study and practice in methods and techniques employed in archaeology such as lithic, ceramic, and faunal analysis. Variable content course. May be repeated when topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • ANT 555 Archaeological Theory

    Prerequisite: ANT 305 and 60 hours.

    A comprehensive and in-depth examination of theoretical issues and perspectives concerning the practice of archaeology and the interpretation of archaeological remains.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 596 Directed Readings in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: 6 hours of ANT and permission of instructor.

    Readings designed to supplement material introduced in previous anthropology courses. Includes a wide selection of literature in the field. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Fall, Spring
  • ANT 598 Seminar in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: 60 hours including 3 hours of Anthropology.

    A detailed investigation and analysis of a specialized or advanced topic of interest to anthropology (e.g., Upper Paleolithic art, the evolution of human behavior, ethnographies of religion). May be repeated when topic changes. Variable content course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ANT 599 Directed Research in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: 9 hours in Anthropology and permission of instructor.

    Individual or group research involving supervised collection and analysis of cultural data. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Fall, Spring
  • ANT 645 Cultural Resource Management

    An examination of laws and regulations pertaining to the preservation of American history and culture and the professional management and preservation of ethnic, historic, and prehistoric cultural resources. May be taught concurrently with ANT 545. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 545 and ANT 645.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • ANT 795 Directed Readings in Anthropology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Supervised readings in preparation for a practicum or thesis project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand

Gerontology (GER) courses

  • GER 180 Successful Aging

    General Education Course (Focus on Cultural Competence).

    Successful aging depends not only on an individual's personal lifestyle choices, but also on their community's attitudes toward aging and on society's resources for the aged. This course aims to educate learners about (1) strategies for personal health, wellbeing, and longevity, (2) the impacts of development life stages and socio-historical socialization on generational cohorts' worldviews, (3) the importance of considering multiple perspectives and striving for cultural competence of all ages, (4) how to become anti-ageist, and (5) ways to advocate for older adults and promote structural improvements that will increase the quality of late life for all citizens.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring, Summer
  • GER 300 Service-Learning Curricular Component

    Prerequisite: 30 hours and concurrent registration in a gerontology course designated as service-learning offering.

    An integrative learning experience which addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs by incorporating community service with classroom instruction. Includes 40 hours on-task service to a community organization, agency or public service provider. The community service placement agency and service assignment will vary, dependent on the course topic and learning objectives. May be repeated.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1Fall, Spring
  • GER 301 The Elderly and the Media: Confronting Popular Stereotypes

    Prerequisite: 30 hours.

    Students will be introduced to common stereotypes held about the elderly within our society and statistics and information which prove these stereotypes to be false. Public perceptions of the elderly will be studied through the use of five commercial motion pictures and a review of four articles covering topics related to the theme of each of the films. The class will focus on how stereotypes about the elderly are both reinforced and challenged in commercial motion pictures, how stereotypes affect an older person's self-concept, and how popular ageist stereotypes shape our own views on growing older.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    110Upon demand
  • GER 309 Identity and Aging in Literature and Film

    Prerequisite: PSY 121 or SOC 150; and ENG 110.

    Emphasizes the experience of aging as perceived from the older person's point of view and that of society. Situations in later life will be explored through the use of short stories, selected articles, and videos. The topics covered will include health, friendship and relationships, widowhood, family and intergenerational relationships, perceptions of death and dying, and finding purpose and meaning in life. Students will acquire a basic understanding of identity issues and factors that contribute to well-being in later life. Identical with PSY 309. Cannot receive credit for both GER 309 and PSY 309.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • GER 351 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging

    Prerequisite: PSY 121 or GER 375.

    Principles and practical applications in development of the adult. Includes psychological effects of personality and intellect. Both normal and abnormal phenomena are considered. Identical with PSY 350. Cannot receive credit for both GER 351 and PSY 350.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • GER 354 Gender and Sexuality in Later Life

    Prerequisite: PSY 121 or SOC 150; and GST 170 or 45 hours.

    A comparison of the aging experiences of men and women in later life. The relevance of gender, gender roles and sexuality to the aging process will be considered. Specific topics of analysis will include the gender gap in longevity, psychological and physical health, LGBTQ status, minority status, socioeconomic status, family relationships, and public policy issues. Identical with PSY 354. Cannot receive credit for both GER 354 and PSY 354.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • GER 363 Death and Human Behavior

    Prerequisite: PSY 121 or SOC 150.

    An introduction to the varied aspects of death and dying. The course will focus on attitudes toward death, fears of death and dying, special needs of those who have a life threatening illness, means of helping the survivors and techniques for prolonging life. Identical with PSY 363. Cannot receive credit for both GER 363 and PSY 363.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • GER 366 Families in Later Life

    Prerequisite: PSY 121 or SOC 150; and CFD 155 or CFD 163 or 30 hours.

    Examination of the structure and function of families in later life. Topics of interest include demographic trends impacting the structure of the family, marriage, sibling relations, parent-adult child relations, grandparenthood, widowhood, and retirement. The application of family theories and their relevance to later life families will be discussed. Identical with CFD 365, SWK 365, and PSY 366. Can only receive credit for one of following: CFD 365, GER 366, PSY 366 or SWK 365.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • GER 370 Mental Health and Aging

    Prerequisite: PSY 121 or SOC 150.

    Personality adjustment in old age, with emphasis both on adequate and maladjusted development. Factors influencing adjustment are considered. Both functional and organic sources of maladjustment are surveyed. Identical with PSY 370. Cannot receive credit for both GER 370 and PSY 370.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • GER 375 Social Forces and Aging

    Prerequisite: PSY 121 or SOC 150; and 30 hours.

    Examines the aging process, demographic trends, and the social, economic, and social-psychological aspects of aging in the United States. Students will be introduced to current theories on aging in social gerontology and their application to the everyday lives of older people. Topics of interest include social attitudes toward aging, family and social bonds, work and retirement, gender issues, ethnicity and aging, living environments, and approaches to aging well. Students will learn about the role of federal, state and local agencies in meeting the needs of the elderly. Identical with SOC 375. Cannot receive credit for both GER 375 and SOC 375.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • GER 396 Directed Readings in Gerontology

    Prerequisite: 6 hours of gerontology and permission.

    Readings designed to supplement material introduced in previous Gerontology courses. Includes a wide selection of literature in the field. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • GER 397 Special Topics in Gerontology

    Prerequisite: 6 hours of designated courses in the gerontology major.

    In-depth inquiry into selected interdisciplinary topics of contemporary interest in gerontology. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • GER 470 Community Resources for Older Adults

    Prerequisite: GER 375.

    Covers the services, programs and institutions involved in providing services to older adults in the United States, with a focus on community-based services. Typical needs, issues, concerns and desires of older persons are identified and corresponding community-based services to address these needs are discussed. Emerging issues and developments in the field of gerontology will also be discussed as they relate to community services and resources. Site visits to agencies and organizations serving older adults will enhance students' familiarity with resources to improve the quality of life and well-being of aging members in our society. Identical with SWK 470. Cannot receive credit for both GER 470 and SWK 470.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • GER 480 Policies and Older Adults

    Prerequisite: GER 375.

    Students will be introduced to the development and practice of social policy, on the state and federal level, and how it affects services to the older adult population. Political organizations that influence the lives of the elderly (e.g., the American Association of Retired Persons, Gray Panthers, Older Women's League) will be examined as well as government and social welfare programs (i.e., Social Security, Medicaid and Medicare). What constitutes "citizenship" and the role of a "senior citizen" will also be explored.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • GER 492 Directed Research

    Prerequisite: GER 375 and permission of sponsoring faculty member and department head.

    Allows students to gain research experience by working with an individual faculty member either as a research assistant or as a primary researcher working under faculty supervision. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-4Fall, Spring
  • GER 597 Special Topics in Gerontology

    Prerequisite: 90 hours; and 12 hours of gerontology.

    In-depth inquiry into selected interdisciplinary topics of contemporary interest in gerontology. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when topic changes. May be taught concurrently with GER 697. Cannot receive credit for both GER 597 and GER 697.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • GER 598 Supervised Practicum in Gerontology

    Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in GER 599; completion of gerontology core courses with C grade or better in each; and permission of the program coordinator.

    Onsite contacts with elderly individuals through an internship at a residential or community placement approved by the coordinator. Direct supervision will be provided by qualified professionals in the field of gerontology. Students will serve 45 clock hours for each credit hour awarded. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    6-9Fall, Spring
  • GER 599 Seminar in Gerontology

    Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in GER 598; completion of the gerontology core courses with C grade or better in each; and permission of the program coordinator.

    Weekly meetings to allow students to correlate experiences in GER 598 with academic knowledge, share experiences, and broaden contacts in the field of aging. Survey of current literature in gerontology from various disciplines will be included. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • GER 697 Special Topics in Gerontology

    Recommended Prerequisite: 12 hours of Gerontology. In-depth inquiry into selected interdisciplinary topics of contemporary interest in gerontology. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when topic changes. May be taught concurrently with GER 597. Cannot receive credit for both GER 597 and GER 697.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand

Gender Studies (GST) courses

  • GST 170 Sex, Gender, and Self

    An introduction to Gender Studies that explores the influence that ideas about sex, gender, and gender roles have on women and men, both as individuals and as social beings. Using new research on gender in many disciplines, it examines representations of male and female experiences, and historical and social constructions of women's and men's roles.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
  • GST 315 The Economics of Gender

    Prerequisite: ECO 165.

    This course teaches students to analyze the economic decisions made by both males and females in two main areas: the labor market and the household. Specific areas of inquiry include the following: the family as an economic unit, gender differences in labor force participation, occupational gender segregation, explanations for gender earnings differentials and efforts to reduce such differentials, gender earnings discrimination, and international gender issues. Identical with ECO 315. Cannot receive credit for both GST 315 and ECO 315.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • GST 326 Feminist Theories of Social Order

    Prerequisite: SOC 150 or GST 170.

    This course offers an introductory survey of feminist theories within a sociological framework. Students will read and discuss significant classical and contemporary feminist writings on how social life is organized, maintained or changed. The feminist literature has led to the emergence of diverse theoretical frameworks analyzing historical and contemporary, macro and micro, public and private, local and global issues and concerns. The feminist paradigm, like many other paradigms, is inclusive of many disciplines. The sociological writings within this paradigm provide a wealth of materials on alternative views of social organization, order and conflict.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • GST 400 Gender in Global Community

    Prerequisite: SOC 150 or GST 170.

    This course will explore the effects of an integrated global community on gender; how global trends are gender-based in terms of labor market participation, resource allocation, family regulations, health care, crime, war and regional politics. Students will discuss how events and policies in one part of the globe affect gender relations in another region.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • GST 497 Special Topics in Gender Studies

    Prerequisite: permission.

    In-depth inquiry into selected topics of Gender Studies. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours if the topic is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Fall, Spring

Sociology (SOC) courses

  • SOC 150 Introduction to Society

    General Education Course (Focus on Social and Behavioral Sciences).

    The study of society including its structure and operation from the perspective of sociology. The course focuses on ways society is constructed by people and, in turn, on the ways society shapes people. This general education course supplies students with a community as well as global, multicultural understanding of society.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    330Fall, SpringSOCI 101 - General Sociology.
  • SOC 152 Social Problems in the Community

    Prerequisite: 12 hours.
    General Education Course (Focus on Public Issues).

    Sociological perspectives on contemporary social issues and problems in American society that are faced by today's communities. A public sociology focus is addressed in this course. This general education course will allow students to recognize the importance of contributing their knowledge and experiences to help resolve social problems in their own community and the broader society.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    330Fall, SpringSOCI 201 - Social Problems.
  • SOC 220 Statistics for Social Research

    A first course in statistics for students whose college and career paths require knowledge of the fundamentals of the collection, analysis and interpretation of data. Topics include the presentation of interpretation of univariate and bivariate data using graphical and numerical methods, probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, linear regression, statistical inference, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Emphasis is placed on the development of statistical thinking and the use of technology. Cannot receive credit toward a degree for more than one of the following courses: AGR 330, IPE 381, MTH 340, PSY 200, QBA 237, REC 328, SOC 220.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • SOC 300 Service Learning Curricular Component

    Prerequisite: 30 hours and concurrent registration in a Sociology course designated as service-learning offering.

    An integrative learning experience which addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs by incorporating community service with classroom instruction. Includes 40 hours on-task service to a community organization, agency or public service provider. The community service placement agency and service assignment will vary, dependent on the disciplinary course topic and learning objectives. May be repeated.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1Upon demand
  • SOC 301 Research Methodology

    Methods of collecting and analyzing data including survey, interviewing and observation techniques, scaling and sampling designs.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • SOC 309 Work, Employment, and Society

    This course explores the concept of work in Western society with a focus on the social organization of work, current trends affecting the workplace, and inequalities. Topics include the structure of work, economic changes, and concerns of workers such as earnings, benefits, unemployment, and the balance between work and family.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • SOC 310 Social Deviance

    An historical survey of the explanations of deviant behavior. Emphasis will focus on the structure of norms and rules, their diversity, and their role in identifying deviance.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 311 Sociology of Sexuality

    This course studies a wide range of sexual phenomena from a sociological perspective. Sociologists know that sex does not happen in a vacuum. To the contrary, sex is tied up with history, culture, politics, and power. Though we like to believe that our sexual behavior is a private experience untouched by society, sexual desire and sexual activity are in fact structured by social interactions. We can see this in the way that sexuality, sexual practice, and sexual identity are not static concepts, but rather are fluid and different throughout time and space.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall (even-numbered years), Spring (even-numbered years)
  • SOC 315 The Family

    The family as a social institution; its adjustment to modern social conditions; personality adjustments in marriage.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 316 Urban Sociology

    The rise and development of urban settlements (cities), their ecology, problems, and an examination of urbanism as a way of life generated in cities.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • SOC 318 Sociology of Intimate Relationships

    This course will explore love, romance, desire, courtship, and intimate relationships in the modern world. Course will examine some of the cultural, structural, and historical conditions that shape one of the most profound sets of human experiences: those associated with love and relationships.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • SOC 319 Environmental Sociology

    This course examines the causes and consequences of environmental problems, environmental movements, impacts of technological change, environmental policy and the state, environmental values, attitudes, and behaviors. Specific topics will vary, but may include resource scarcity, toxics, overconsumption, agricultural production, and more.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 320 Political Sociology

    Introduces students to a sociological analysis of political organization forms and their relations with other elements of social life. Students examine the concept of power and the intersection of personality, social structure, and politics. The course also emphasizes how social inequality between groups (e.g. race, class, and gender, etc.) influences politics and elaborates major social trends affecting the political process including how various social forces work to change political policies.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 325 Introduction to Sociological Theory

    Prerequisite: SOC 150.

    A survey of the development of sociological theory with emphasis upon the social and historical influences shaping the thought of classical theorists.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • SOC 332 Juvenile Delinquency

    This course examines the topic of juvenile delinquency from a sociological perspective. Emphasis is placed on measuring and explaining the occurrence of delinquency in the United States. The course also takes a critical look at societal responses to the delinquency problem, including the juvenile justice system.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 336 Race and Ethnicity

    This course explores the social construction of race and ethnicity. Issues of differential power between racial and ethnic groups and the economic, political, and social structures which are utilized to maintain these power differences are identified. Social movements and social policies designed to address social inequality, prejudice and discrimination are also examined. Identical with AAS 336. Cannot receive credit for both SOC 336 and AAS 336.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 337 Sociology of Gender

    This course focuses on gender differences, patterns, and inequalities. It analyzes the social construction of gender, femininities and masculinities, gender socialization, and how gender intersects with race, class, and sexuality. Specific attention is paid to the significance of gender in interaction, culture, and social institutions, including work, politics, media, and the family.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 340 Global Health and Social Justice

    This course considers social forces that affect people's health, risk of illness, and access to adequate health services across the globe. Course will analyze social and political conditions that give rise to and reinforce inequities in health and health outcomes. With the understanding that health is, at its core, a social justice issue, this course also considers policies and programs that attempt to address health problems by reducing disparities. Students will gain familiarity with global perspectives and influences on human health that are relevant to careers in health care and other fields. Specific topics include major health threats and global health priorities, social and environmental contributions to health and illness, and organizational responses to health concerns.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall (odd-numbered years)
  • SOC 341 Medical Sociology

    An analysis of the ecological, sociopsychological and cultural aspects of health and illness, both physical and mental, and of the social organization of health care services and of health professions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • SOC 350 Violence and Society in Latin America

    This course offers an interdisciplinary approach towards the understanding of violence and society in Latin America, allowing the students to develop an in-depth understanding of Latin American social history. Students will examine the issue of violence as the history, government, culture, values, language, nation, gender, race, and social inequalities within Latin American societies. The course will provide a broad understanding of the major elements in the development of Latin America over the past decades. Topics may include socioeconomic development, poverty and inequality, social movements, institutions, and social change. The course will demonstrate Latin America in a transnational context. Students are expected to be critically engaged throughout the course. Expert guest lecturers will also be invited to participate.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • SOC 357 Sociology of Sport

    Investigation and analysis of the relationship between sport and society; the development and changing nature of sport as an institution; role of sport in modern society.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 360 The Individual in Society

    This course explores how self understanding emerges in a social context and is inseparable from that context. It examines the symbolic basis of communication, traces the interdependency of self and other awareness, and probes the social organization of human experience.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 375 Social Forces and Aging

    Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

    This course examines the aging process, demographic trends, and the social, economic, and social-psychological aspects of aging in the United States. Students will be introduced to current theories on aging in social gerontology and their application to the everyday lives of older people. Topics of interest include social attitudes toward aging, family and social bonds, work and retirement, gender issues, ethnicity and aging, living environments, and approaches to aging well. Students will learn about the role of federal, state and local agencies in meeting the needs of the elderly. Identical with GER 375. Cannot receive credit for both GER 375 and SOC 375.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 380 Sociology of Law

    The interaction of law and society from a sociological perspective with emphasis upon legal institutions as instruments of social control. The impact of social values on the development of the legal order and the reciprocal influence of the law on social behavior.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • SOC 384 Social Movements

    The study of collective attempts to implement social change in society. Specific groups studied will vary, but may include the civil rights, feminist, political, religious, environmental and health movements.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • SOC 390 Religion in Society

    Examines the relationship between religion and its social context. Students will explore the social nature of individual religious institutions. The relationship between religion and modernity will be studied. The course will pay special attention to the role of religion in American society, as well as the religious dimensions of class, gender, region, and race/ethnicity. Identical with REL 390. Cannot receive credit for both SOC 390 and REL 390.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 397 Special Topics

    Selected topics of contemporary interest in Sociology. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when the topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • SOC 398 Public Sociology and Community Studies

    Prerequisite: SOC 150 and Sociology major or minor.

    Explores how Public Sociology is practiced and connected to the local community. Provides conceptual tools for analyzing communities and creates a foundation for meaningful community engagement. Each section will apply sociological theories and methods to a specific community issue or problem.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • SOC 403 Special Topics in Social Research

    Prerequisite: SOC 301.

    This course provides instruction and applied experience in a particular research method such as: survey design, program evaluation, interview/focus groups, field method, quantitative analysis, etc. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when the topic changes. No more than six hours may be applied to the Sociology major.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • SOC 420 Social Inequality

    Prerequisite: SOC 150.

    An analysis of the structure, sources, and consequences of social inequality and the dimensions along which it may be observed.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • SOC 430 The Nonprofit Sector and Civil Society

    This course is a broad exploration of the nonprofit organizational environment and how it relates to civil society. It explores the wide variety of organizations within the nonprofit sector, such as nonprofit and voluntary organizations, non-governmental organizations, philanthropic foundations, and civil society institutions. It reviews theories explaining the development of the nonprofit sector in relation to business and government. It combines a theoretical/conceptual approach with practical applications and local community examples. Nonprofits are explored at local (Springfield), national, and global levels.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring (even-numbered years)
  • SOC 450 Population, Society, and Public Policy

    This course provides an introduction to the field of demography with an emphasis on demographic techniques, population processes of fertility, mortality, migration, and the impact of population change on society and public policy. Topics of interest will include analysis of population size, characteristics, and growth/decline; overpopulation and sustainability; population aging, cohorts, and generations; changes to the family (fertility, marriage, divorce, and cohabitation); myths and realities surrounding immigration; and the role of public policy in addressing population issues.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • SOC 456 Food in Society

    This course examines how procuring food impacts societal organization and is a catalyst for social change. The basic premise of this course is that understanding how a society feeds itself will reveal many sociological insights such as the distribution of wealth and power and the health of individuals and communities.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SOC 470 Practicum in Applied Sociological Research

    Prerequisite: SOC 301 and SOC 302 and SOC 325 and permission of instructor.

    Group experience in designing and carrying out an applied community research project. Variable content course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    324Upon demand
  • SOC 480 Health Inequities Across the Life Course

    Prerequisite: SOC 150 or permission of instructor.

    Why are some social groups more susceptible to poorer health outcomes than others? In this course, we address this question by examining the extent of, patterns of, and reasons behind social inequities in health and wellbeing across the life span. This course draws on interdisciplinary perspectives including sociology, social epidemiology, psychology, health demography, feminist theory, critical studies, and health services research to provide an in-depth investigation of how health inequities across race/ethnicity, gender/sex, sexual identity, class and other social locations emerge and are perpetuated throughout time. The focus will largely center on social and structural determinants of health. Lastly, the course will focus on health policy, and the ways that health policy shapes priorities regarding actions taken to lessen health inequities across groups. Though the course will center on the U.S. context, we will also investigate health inequities across the globe, particularly as they compare to U.S. inequities. This course is ideal for anyone interested in research or applied careers in health and health care as well as those curious at how the social environment can influence one's health and wellbeing.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • SOC 492 Leadership and Professional Development

    Prerequisite: senior standing.

    All students majoring in Sociology are required to enroll in this course during their senior year. This course serves as the Public Affairs Capstone Experience for the Sociology major. The course has three focus areas: 1) career or graduate school preparation for upcoming graduates; 2) leadership concepts and applications; and 3) an individualized, community-based, applied experience in community service, career preparation, or research. In addition, students will complete several program-specific assessments of learning outcomes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    3Fall, Spring
  • SOC 497 Special Topics

    Prerequisite: 9 hours sociology and permission of instructor.

    Selected topics in substantive areas in sociology such as theory, methodology, social organization, social psychology, demography, criminology and family. Offered when resources and demand allow. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • SOC 499 Internship in Applied Sociology

    Prerequisite: 18 hours in Sociology and permission of instructor.

    Supervised work experience in business, industry, governmental, institutional and/or agency settings where sociological skills are utilized. One credit hour for each 35 clock hours on the job. No more than six hours internship credit may be applied to the Sociology major.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • SOC 596 Directed Readings in Sociology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Readings designed to supplement material introduced in previous Sociology courses. Includes a wide selection from literature in the field. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours, but no more than six hours may be applied to the sociology major. May be taught concurrently with SOC 697. Cannot receive credit for both SOC 596 and SOC 697.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • SOC 599 Sociological Research

    Prerequisite: SOC 150 and SOC 301 and SOC 302 and SOC 325 and permission of instructor.

    Independent and/or group work in research methodology, data manipulation and presentation in selected fields of sociology. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • SOC 697 Directed Readings in Sociology

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Readings designed to supplement material introduced in previous Sociology courses. Includes a wide selection from literature in the field. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours, but no more than six hours may be applied to the sociology major. May be taught concurrently with SOC 596. Cannot receive credit for both SOC 596 and SOC 697.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand