History Courses

African American Studies (AAS) courses

  • AAS 100 Introduction to African American Studies

    Focus on Humanities

    The course provides a multidisciplinary introduction of the many dimensions of the African American experience, including the African heritage and diaspora, slavery and freedom, African American artistic and literary expression, and the problem of racism in American society.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • AAS 312 Anthropology of Gender

    ANT 100 or ANT 303 or permission of instructor.

    Theories, concepts, and case studies relating to the cultural and social construction of gender from an anthropological perspective. Students will examine gender in relation to sexuality, fertility, child-bearing, self-identification, family, power, status, voice, hegemony/resistance, colonialism, and globalization in cultures and societies around the world. Identical with ANT 312. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 312 and ANT 312.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 323 Women in Africa

    This course will introduce students to women's participation in Africa's history and contemporary issues. The readings cover a broad geographical range of North, West, Central and Southern Africa. The course will include five topics: Women and the Family; Women, Politics, and Economics; Religious Women; Women in Colonial Rebellion; and Women and National Revolutions. Identical with HST 323. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 323 and HST 323.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 330 Peoples and Cultures

    Anthropological study of a cultural region of the world (such as the Caribbean, Latin America, or Southeastern Indians), including environment, subsistence, technology, economy, social and political organization, and religion. Identical with ANT 330. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 330 and ANT 330. Variable content course. May be repeated when topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • AAS 331 African American History I

    Survey of the experiences of Americans of African descent to 1865. Emphasis on African heritage; African-American contributions and institutions; slavery and quasi-freedom. Identical with HST 331. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 331 and HST 331.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 332 African American History II

    Continuation of AAS 331, 1865-present. Emphasis on the struggles for racial justice; protest organizations, philosophies and tactics. Identical with HST 332. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 332 and HST 332.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 333 Peoples and Cultures of Africa

    An exploration of African societies (especially sub-Saharan), including family structure, gender relations, social and political organization, beliefs, economics, art, oral literature, music, dance, and other aspects of culture. Identical with ANT 332. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 333 and ANT 332.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 334 Conflict and Peace Building in Africa

    This course examines the historical roots, dimensions, and causes of conflict in Africa. Thematically organized to capture developments across the different regions in the continent, the course offers critical insights into the preponderance of conflict in Africa since the Cold War. In addition, the course explores the various ways through which Africans, its partners, and international organizations have fostered peace and conflict resolution in Africa over the years. Identical with HST 334. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 334 and HST 334.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 335 African Civilization

    Historical developments in Africa from antiquity to the present. Emphasis on south Saharan Africa for the period before European contact. Topics in modern nationalism and independence. Africa in the context of world history. Identical with HST 335. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 335 and HST 335.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 336 Race and Ethnicity

    This course explores the social construction of race and ethnicity. Issues of differential power between racial and ethnic groups and the economic, political, and social structures which are utilized to maintain these power differences are identified. Social movements and social policies designed to address social inequality, prejudice and discrimination are also examined. Identical with SOC 336. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 336 and SOC 336.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 338 Sources and Methods in African History

    This course deals with knowledge generation, production, and dissemination about Africa and its peoples. It traces the origin, progress, and current state of scholarship on Africa and about Africans. It is about writing and understanding Africa and its history. It examines the kind of history that has been written about events in Africa. In other words, it is concerned with the study of and nature of history in Africa. Given this basic disposition, the course is a reflection on history in Africa as a discipline and the problems involved in the writing of African history globally. Identical with HST 338. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 338 and HST 338.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 339 Africa and the Wider World

    This course traces the history of Africa from the slave trade to independence. The course is thematically organized to capture developments across the different regions in the continent; and offers critical insights into the place of Africa in world history, especially in relations to and with global developments. As a survey course, the course offers insights into the different regions, paying particular attention to cultural, economic and political changes. Identical with HST 339. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 339 and HST 339.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 345 Enslavement in the Atlantic World

    This course examines various social, political, and economic developments of enslaved societies in the Americas (North, Central and South), the West Indies, and Africa from roughly the 1200s to the late-1800s with a primary focus upon the lives and roles played by people of the African Diaspora and their encounters with Europeans and Indigenous Americans. Identical with HST 345. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 345 and HST 345.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 346 African American Religious Experience

    Explores the establishment and maintenance of African American religious institutions, particularly the Black Churches and their future development. Identical with REL 345. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 346 and REL 345.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 355 African American Literature

    ENG 110.

    Survey of representative works of fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction in the context of social and cultural movements. Identical with ENG 355. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 355 and ENG 355.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • AAS 363 Introduction to African Literature

    ENG 110.

    Survey of representative works of fiction, poetry, drama, folklore, personal narratives, and essays from various countries on the African continent written in or translated into English. Identical with ENG 363. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 363 and ENG 363.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 397 Topics in African American Studies

    permission.

    Topics of general interest in the area of African American Studies. Examples: African Independence, Negritude, Harlem Renaissance, 1960s Civil Rights Movement, the Black Panther Party, Nation of Islam in the U.S., Afrocentricism, and African/African American Destiny. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours, provided that the topic is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • AAS 455 African American Drama

    ENG 110.

    Study of African American drama from the antebellum period to the present, with emphasis on the intersections of dramatic art and such social and cultural movements as abolitionism, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Black Arts Movement. Identical with ENG 455. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 455 and ENG 455.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 490 Field Experience in Anthropology

    permission of instructor.

    Supervised group study and/or research in an off campus setting. A fee may be charged to cover travel expenses. Identical with ANT 490. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 490 and ANT 490. Variable content course. May be repeated when topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-6Upon demand
  • AAS 497 Directed Reading

    permission.

    Analysis of various topics in African American Studies not covered in regular courses. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours, provided that the topic is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • AAS 531 African American Leaders and Movements

    50 hours.

    Study of African American leaders and movements in the United States, with emphasis on the period since World War II. Identical with HST 531. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 531 and HST 531.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 532 History of Ancient Egypt

    History of ancient Egypt from its unification in approximately 3200 BCE through 500 CE. Foundation of this course is the political history of ancient Egypt, but special attention is paid to particular social history topics, such as the origins of monotheism during the Amarna Period, interactions with the outside world (especially with the ancient Near East, Nubia, and Classical Greece and Rome) and varied topics relating to daily life (e.g. early medicine and science, education, personal piety). A particular emphasis is placed on primary sources in translation and archaeological evidence. Identical with HST 532. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 532 and HST 532. May be taught concurrently with HST 632. Cannot receive credit for both HST 532 and HST 632.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • AAS 550 Modern African Politics

    PLS 101.

    A comparative study of the political and economic systems of contemporary Africa with emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa. Ideologies and strategies pursued by selected African governments are covered, including an assessment of contemporary economic, political, and strategic ties within the region and internationally. The class will emphasize such areas as Mauritania, Senegal, Kenya, Somalia, Nigeria, and South Africa. Identical with PLS 550. Cannot receive credit for both AAS 550 and PLS 550.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall

History (HST) courses

  • HST 103 World History to Circa 1600 C.E.

    Focus on Humanities

    This course examines the formation and development of the world's major societies and systematically explores cross-cultural interactions and exchanges that have been some of the most effective agents of change in all of world history from Pre-History to circa 1600 C.E. Students cannot receive credit for both HST 101 and HST 103.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, SpringHIST 201 - World History I.
  • HST 104 World History since 1600 C.E.

    Focus on Humanities

    This course examines the formation and development of the world's major societies and systematically explores cross-cultural interactions and exchanges that have been some of the most effective agents of change in all of world history since 1600 C.E. Students cannot receive credit for both HST 102 and HST 104.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, SpringHIST 202 - World History II.
  • HST 121 Survey of the History of the United States to 1877

    Focus on Constitutions of US and Missouri and American History and Institutions

    Formation of the United States and its civilization from the Age of Discovery through the Reconstruction Era, with emphasis on the influence of the Frontier and the Native American, European and African heritages; the constitutional development of the federal government; the evolution of the nation's economic system, social fabric and diplomatic experiences.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, SpringHIST 101 - American History I.
  • HST 122 Survey of the History of the United States since 1877

    Focus on Constitutions of US and Missouri and American History and Institutions

    Modernization of the United States and its role in world affairs from the late 19th Century to the present, with emphasis on industrialization and urbanization and their impact on socioeconomic and international developments.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, SpringHIST 102 - American History II.
  • HST 199 Preparation Strategies for the Missouri Content Assessment in Social Science

    admission to Teacher Education and concurrent enrollment in either HST 417 or HST 418.

    This course supports students in their preparation to take the Missouri Content Assessment in Social Science. The course familiarizes students with the test framework and types of questions covered in the exam. The course does not provide comprehensive coverage of the test content; students taking this course should have already obtained that content through the content courses required for the degree. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    0Fall, Spring
  • HST 210 Writing II: Historical Inquiry

    ENG 110 and 30 hours.
    Focus on Written Communication and Integrative and Applied Learning

    Introduction to historical research and writing. Meets Writing II requirement for a major in history. This course emphasizes the techniques of conducting a thorough literature search, the analysis of primary and secondary materials, and instruction and practice in historical writing.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • HST 300 Service-Learning in History

    30 hours, concurrent registration in a History course designated as a service-learning offering and permission of department head.

    This service component for an existing course incorporates community service with classroom instruction in History to provide an integrative learning experience that addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs. Includes 40 hours of service that benefits an external community organization, agency, or public service provider. Approved service placements and assignments will vary depending on the specific course topic and learning objectives; a list of approved placements and assignments is available from the instructor and the Citizenship and Service-Learning Office. May be repeated.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1Fall, Spring
  • HST 312 History of American Baseball

    Survey of the history of baseball in the United States from the early nineteenth century to the present. Focus is on the commercialization of the game, the development of labor-management relations, and the manner in which class, race, and gender have shaped participation in the sport.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 313 American Cultural History

    An introduction to the major issues, themes and methods of American cultural history. This course will explore multiple vantage points and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding American cultural history.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 314 American Expansion and Empire

    This course surveys the territorial, economic, cultural, and political expansion of the United States from the founding of the country through the 20th century. Topics include the ideology, methods, and effects of expansion, with particular attention on the cultural interactions that resulted from expansion and the ways in which expansion affected American culture and Society.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 315 Military History of the United States

    American Military History from the colonial period to the present; its relation to the national development in war and peace.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • HST 323 Women in Africa

    This course will introduce students to women's participation in Africa's history and contemporary issues. The readings cover a broad geographical range of North, West, Central and Southern Africa. The course will include five topics: Women and the Family; Women, Politics, and Economics; Religious Women; Women in Colonial Rebellion; and Women and National Revolutions. Identical with AAS 323. Cannot receive credit for both HST 323 and AAS 323.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 324 Women in American History

    A survey of the role of American women from the colonial era to the present. Topics include women's historical roles in work, family, politics, sexuality and culture.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 329 The Automobile in American Life

    Examines the impact of the automobile on American society during the twentieth century. Topics include the manufacture, marketing and maintenance of automobiles, the transformation of rural and urban life, the decline of transit and the impact of the automobile on social life.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 331 African American History I

    Survey of the experiences of Americans of African descent to 1865. Emphasis on African heritage; African-American contributions and institutions; slavery and quasi-freedom. Identical with AAS 331. Cannot receive credit for both HST 331 and AAS 331.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 332 African American History II

    Continuation of HST 331, 1865-present. Emphasis on the struggles for racial justice; protest organizations, philosophies and tactics. Identical with AAS 332. Cannot receive credit for both HST 332 and AAS 332.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 334 Conflict and Peace Building in Africa

    This course examines the historical roots, dimensions, and causes of conflict in Africa. Thematically organized to capture developments across the different regions in the continent, the course offers critical insights into the preponderance of conflict in Africa since the Cold War. In addition, the course explores the various ways through which Africans, its partners, and international organizations have fostered peace and conflict resolution in Africa over the years. Identical with AAS 334. Cannot receive credit for both HST 334 and AAS 334.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 335 African Civilization

    Historical developments in Africa from antiquity to the present. Emphasis on south Saharan Africa for the period before European contact. Topics in modern nationalism and independence. Africa in the context of world history. Identical with AAS 335. Cannot receive credit for both HST 335 and AAS 335.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 338 Sources and Methods in African History

    This course deals with knowledge generation, production, and dissemination about Africa and its peoples. It traces the origin, progress, and current state of scholarship on Africa and about Africans. It is about writing and understanding Africa and its history. It examines the kind of history that has been written about events in Africa. In other words, it is concerned with the study of and nature of history in Africa. Given this basic disposition, the course is a reflection on history in Africa as a discipline and the problems involved in the writing of African history globally. Identical with AAS 338. Cannot receive credit for both HST 338 and AAS 338.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 339 Africa and the Wider World

    This course traces the history of Africa from the slave trade to independence. The course is thematically organized to capture developments across the different regions in the continent; and offers critical insights into the place of Africa in world history, especially in relations to and with global developments. As a survey course, the course offers insights into the different regions, paying particular attention to cultural, economic and political changes. Identical with AAS 339. Cannot receive credit for both HST 339 and AAS 339.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 340 Industrialization in Global Perspective

    This course looks at origins and spread of industrialization as a global phenomena beginning with the preindustrial wave of global expansion that began around 1450 and continuing up to the present. It blends broad synthetic treatments with detailed case studies to trace the development and spread of industrial technology across cultures. Although the perspective is global most of the geographic concentration is on Britain, the U.S., Japan, and more recently, China.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 343 Ancient Rome

    Roman civilization to the downfall of the Empire. Broad social, economic, technological and cultural developments. The problems of the decline of ancient civilization.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 345 Enslavement in the Atlantic World

    This course examines various social, political, and economic developments of slave societies in the Americas (North, Central and South), the West Indies, and Africa from roughly the 1200s to the late-1800s with a primary focus upon the lives and roles played by people of the African Diaspora and their encounters with Europeans and Indigenous Americans. Identical with AAS 345. Cannot receive credit for both HST 345 and AAS 345.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 346 Drunk History: A Global History of Alcohol

    The course provides a 'global' survey of the history of alcohol, especially in its relationship with labor, political policies, and the economy. Course will explore how these substances became implicated in the formation of gendered, racial, and ethnic identities, as well as in the contexts of imperialism and nationalism. This course will also survey the relationship between inebriation and incarceration, and how alcohol facilitated labor exploitation and racial oppression. 

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 350 Latin American Civilization

    Foundations of Ibero-American civilization including the Amer-Indian, Iberian and African background; Emphasis on the origins of institutions and problems which affect the region as a whole.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 351 History of Europe to 1650

    This course explores the broad contours of European history from the first peopling of the continent to the seventeenth century with special emphasis on long-term political, social and economic developments.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 352 Crisis in the Late Middle Ages

    This course examines environmental, biological, political, and spiritual crises in Europe between 1300 and 1500, with a primary focus on the Great Famine, the Black Death, the Hundred Years War, the Avignon Papacy, and the Great Schism. The course focuses on the role of spiritual crises, prolonged war, and death from famine and disease in reshaping social, political, and economic expectations at the end of the Middle Ages, as well as the ways in which large-scale changes were experienced by individual people living at the time.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 354 History of Europe, 1715-Present

    HST 104.

    This course surveys the major themes of European history from the 18th century to the present. Topics will include the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire, industrialization and its consequences, nationalism and imperialism during the "Long 19th Century" the "World Wars" of the 20th century, and the evolving social, political, and cultural dynamics of modern and contemporary Europe.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 356 Nazi Germany

    This course has been envisioned as a multi-disciplinary course, dealing with the complex and often controversial aspects of Nazi rule. The course begins chronologically with the examination of the crisis in Weimar Democracy and the Nazi seizure of power. Then it discusses the transformation of German society under Nazi rule; the fate of youth organizations, schools, universities and churches; the impact of Nazism on popular and high cultures; Nazi social policy; war on racial and ethnic minorities and homosexuals. The third part deals with Nazi foreign policy; the Second World War; the genocide of Eastern Europeans; the Holocaust, and the collapse of the Third Reich. At the final meeting, students discuss the memory of the Third Reich.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 360 Britain and the World, 55 B.C.-1707

    Impact of European invasions on social structure, social cohesion and demography; feudalism and its decline; emergence of early modern England in Tudor and Stuart periods; Civil War, the Glorious Revolution, and the Unification of Britain.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 361 Britain and World 1707-Present

    Transition to industrial society; aristocratic power and influence; consumer culture; overseas empire and race relations; welfare state; economic and international decline.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 362 Modern Latin American History: From Independence to Present

    This course is the second course in the Latin American Civilization sequence covering the history of Modern Latin American from the wars of independence in the early nineteenth century until the present. The class will explore the racial, class, and gender hierarchies that emerged out of the region's postcolonial past, and their impact on Latin American people's lives. The course will conclude with an examination of twenty-first-century Latin American cultural, political and social issues. Major themes and topics include democracy, dictatorship, revolution, religion, and the importance of race, class, and gender in the history of the region.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 364 History of Women in Latin America

    This course assesses the continuities and changes in the lives of Latin American women through the lens of gender. The course themes will examine concepts that have structured Latin American beliefs about gender including honor and shame, and machismo and marianismo, and examine issues of gender relations, sexuality, and political involvement. This course will examine the history of women in Latin America from the colonial through the modern periods. Other topics will include how women participated in and were influenced by political, economic, and social change, and representations of women in art, music, literature, and recent films.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 369 Ancient Civilizations of the Mediterranean and Middle East

    This course introduces students to the histories of the Ancient Near (aka Middle) East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. It begins with the origins of civilization, and ends with the fall of the Roman Empire and the rise of Islam in the Middle East (c. 4,000 B.C.E. - 650 C.E.). It pays special attention to the diverse political systems of the ancient world, including divine kingship in ancient Egypt and the Near East, the Athenian democracy, the Roman Republic, and the emperors of the Roman Empire. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to learn about select social, cultural, and religious topics, such as the rise of monotheistic religions, the influence of particular artistic traditions, or the role of underrepresented groups (e.g. women, slaves) in the ancient world.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 370 Religions, Cultures, and Empires of the Middle East and North Africa, 570 CE to 1798 CE

    This course introduces students to the history of the Middle East and North Africa from the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the beginnings of European economic, military, and political penetration of the region in the late eighteenth century. The course pays special attention to the development of the Islamic tradition, rise and fall of various regional empires, and the social, cultural, and political transformations that took place over the course of this extended historical era.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 371 The Making of the Modern Middle East, 1750 CE to 1923 CE

    This course provides students with an overview of the broad social, economic, and political trends that reshaped the Middle East and North Africa between the late eighteenth century and the end of the First World War. This includes the growth of European influence over the region, manifest in both direct colonial rule as in Algeria and Egypt, and more indirect forms of domination, as in the Ottoman Empire and Qajar Iran. It also includes an examination of the various responses this changing balance of power provoked in the societies of the Middle East and North Africa. It concludes by contextualizing the collapse of the Ottoman and Qajar empires and the emergence of the region's modern system of nation-states in the aftermath of the First World War.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 375 The Ozarks in American History

    The Ozarks as an historic American region. Historical geography of the Ozarks. The Old Ozarks Frontier; the Modern Ozarks; the Cosmopolitan Ozarks; the New Ozarks Frontier. Relation of the Ozarks to major themes in U.S. History.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 380 Premodern East Asia

    A comparative historical treatment of the countries of East Asia--China, Japan, and Korea--from earliest times to 1600.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • HST 381 Modern East Asia

    A comparative historical treatment of the countries of East Asia--China, Japan, and Korea--from 1600 to the present.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • HST 382 Asia Pacific War

    How did a seventeen year old Indonesian perceive the Japanese occupation? How did that experience differ from a Thai college student? This course will investigate the societies of occupied East and Southeast Asia from 1931-1945 from the perspective of those who experienced it directly. Memoirs, oral histories, visual material, and military reports will be used to understand the perceptions, motivations, and mentalities that drove collective and individual action, and situate that action within the framework of violence. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the cultures involved in the Asia Pacific War, and develop critical skills through analysis of specific issues in class discussion, written exercises and essays. Major course themes: the nature of violence; engaging opposing perspectives in debates about major issues; understanding prevailing theses about those debates.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • HST 383 A Global History of the Inquisition, 1478-1834: The Holy Office in Europe, Asia, and the Americas

    This course closely examines the history of the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions from their establishment in the last fifteenth/early sixteenth centuries to their abolition in the early nineteenth century. The Inquisition was set up in both Spain and Portugal to systematically hunt down heretics and eradicate from Catholic society any form of heretical beliefs. The various groups persecuted by the inquisitorial tribunals in Spain and Portugal's world empires included, amongst others, crypto-Jews, crypto-Muslims, Protestants, bigamists, homosexuals, dissenting intellectuals and witches. This course will examine the actual historical institutions behind the modern myths of the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions; their organization, their modus operandi and their evolution during their more than three centuries of existence both in the Iberian Peninsula and in the Spanish and Portuguese World empires. Topics covered include the history of the Inquisition in Spain and the Spanish Americas, including the existence of the Spanish Inquisition in the early colonial Latin American territories as well as its spread into the colonial North American territories of the Florida, Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri, New Mexico and the Californias; the topics will also include an examination of the history of the Inquisition in Spain and Portugal's Asian colonies such as the Philippines, India (Goa) and China (Macao).

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 384 History of Piracy in the Americas, 1492-1820

    This course examines the history of piracy in the Americas from the point of European contact to the early nineteenth century, a period historians roughly designate as the "early modern." The early modern period was an age marked by new ideas in science, medicine, and religion, by advances in shipbuilding, mining, and artillery manufacture, but also a time of endemic religious conflicts, expansive empires, and wars. In terms of overseas trade and conquest, Spain and Portugal were at the forefront throughout much of this period, and their successes in the Americas and elsewhere led their northern neighbors, particularly the French, English, and Dutch, to cast covetous eyes upon slow-moving, inbound treasure ships. These predators and the prey they seized upon are the primary subject of this course. The course will cover the social history of pirate bands as well as the history of the Transatlantic Treasure fleets and the Spanish Empire's defensive networks. A final examination of the course will focus on the long term consequences, economic and otherwise, that piracy entailed for its mostly Spanish victims.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Summer
  • HST 388 The Second World War

    HST 104.

    This course examines the causes, the major events, and the consequences of the Second World War from a global perspective, meaning that both the European and Asian/Pacific theaters will be covered. Although the significant military campaigns and battles of the war are addressed, this is not intended to be a military history course. Rather, the emphasis will be on the Second World War as the transformative event of the 20th century politically, culturally, socially, economically, and morally, addressing: the ideological agenda of the "Axis Powers" before and during the war; the significance of the home front in the context of "total war"; propaganda and the role of media; human rights and war crimes; and the evolving ways in which the war has been remembered and represented the war in the U.S., Europe, and Asia since 1945.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 390 Introduction to Historiography

    9 hours of history.

    The study of the philosophy, methods, and practice of history as a field of scholarly inquiry. Students are also required to take the Major Field Achievement Test.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • HST 392 European History Primary Source Seminar

    HST 210.

    This is a variable content, writing-intensive seminar in European history. Students will be introduced to methods of primary source analysis and historical writing and prepare a seminar paper based on primary sources on a focused topic in European history.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 393 United States History Primary Source Seminar

    HST 210.

    This is a variable content, writing-intensive seminar in United States history. Students will be introduced to methods of primary source analysis and historical writing and prepare a seminar paper based on primary sources on a focused topic in United States history.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 394 World History Primary Source Seminar

    HST 210.

    This is a variable content, writing-intensive seminar in world history. Students will be introduced to methods of primary source analysis and historical writing and prepare a seminar paper based on primary sources on a focused topic in world history.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 395 Spanish Conquest and Colonization in the Americas, 1492-1700

    This course is intended to introduce students to several topics relating to the conquest and colonization of the region now known as Latin America. These topics and the historical literature surrounding them are essential in understanding the development of both colonial Latin America and the history of the colonial United States. The topics will include examinations of the conquest and colonization of each region of Latin America (from the U.S. Southwest, Mexico, the Andean Region, and lesser known frontiers). Within each topic or section of the course, we will begin with a selection of some of the modern secondary historical literature on the subject, and then we will consider the actual primary documents and sources upon which these histories were written.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 397 Special Topics in History

    A variable content, variable credit course. Specific subject matter will change from term to term, depending upon the interests of professor and student. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours as topics change.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • HST 399 Internship in Public History

    permission.

    Supervised and approved work in oral history or a public or private agency which manages a museum, archive, or historic site. Additionally, students may work with a faculty member or member of the public history community in an internship, presuming the work is focused on skill development or job training. One credit hour is awarded for each 40 hours of service. May be repeated for credit but only six hours may be counted toward the BA, BS, or BSEd in History.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Fall, Spring, Summer
  • HST 417 Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Studies I

    admission to Teacher Education.

    This course introduces students to the theory and methods of teaching social studies on the secondary level in a diverse society. Course topics include the history of the social studies; application of disciplinary thinking to instructional planning; culturally responsive teaching in the social studies classroom; teaching social studies through inquiry; aligning standards, objectives, and instruction; and assessment, student data, and data-based decision making in the social studies classroom.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • HST 418 Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Studies II

    12 hours in history; and HST 417 and EDC 350 and SEC 302 and SPE 340; and current preprofessional liability insurance; and admission to Teacher Education.

    This course engages students in the application of social studies teaching methods in secondary classrooms. Course topics include the development and application of differentiated instruction in the social sciences; lesson and unit planning in diverse contexts; culturally responsive classroom management; application of inquiry and inquiry-based assessments in the social studies classroom; and advanced practice in aligning standards, objectives, and instruction. Completion of minimum of 45 hour practicum assigned at Greenwood Laboratory School or Springfield area secondary school is required. A C grade or better is required in this course in order to take HST 422 or HST 499 and HST 423. Cannot be taken Pass/Not Pass. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    432Fall, Spring
  • HST 420 Supervised Teaching (Secondary Social Studies)

    HST 418; and C grade or better in all professional education courses; and current pre-professional liability insurance; and approval for supervised teaching.

    Student observes then teaches social studies classes under the direction of the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. Student participates in school-related activities appropriate to the assignment and attends all required meetings. In order to receive a grade in this course, the student's professional portfolio must meet or exceed final criteria. Course will not count toward the major GPA.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    6Fall, Spring
  • HST 421 Supervised Teaching (Secondary Social Studies)

    concurrent enrollment in HST 420.

    Student observes then teaches under the direction of the cooperation teacher and the university supervisor. Student participates in school-related activities appropriate to the assignment and attends all required meetings. In order to receive a grade in this course, the student's professional portfolio must meet or exceed final criteria. Course will not count toward the major GPA.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    6Fall, Spring
  • HST 422 Supervised Teaching (Secondary Social Studies)

    HST 199 and HST 418; and C grade or better in all professional education courses; and minimum GPA of 3.00 Social Sciences; and current pre-professional liability insurance; and approval for supervised teaching; and concurrent enrollment in HST 423.

    Student observes then teaches social studies classes under the direction of the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. Student participates in school-related activities appropriate to the assignment and attends all required meetings. Only students seeking secondary social studies certification may enroll in this course. In order to receive a grade in this course, the student's professional portfolio must meet or exceed final criteria. Course will not count toward the major GPA.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    5-10Fall, Spring
  • HST 423 Seminar in Supervised Teaching

    HST 418; and C grade or better in all professional education courses; and minimum GPA of 3.00 in Social Sciences; and approval for supervised teaching; and concurrent enrollment in HST 422.

    A seminar designed for the purpose of discussion and analysis of field experiences during the supervised teaching semester. Topics include: Theory Into Practice, Diversity in the Classroom, Classroom Management, Classroom Assessment, Job Search and Professional Development. Students will attend workshops throughout the semester. Only students seeking secondary social studies certification may enroll in this course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    22Fall, Spring
  • HST 496 Independent Readings in History

    permission of instructor and department head.

    Students should consult with a professor of the department who specializes in the subject; with professor's consent present a written proposal to the department head for approval before final registration for the term in which the reading is to be done. Only one approved Reading Program may be taken in any semester. Areas offered for independent readings: United States, Latin American, Ancient, Medieval, European, Asian and African history. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • HST 499 Clinical Experiences in Teaching II

    EDC 199; and admitted to Teacher Education; and C grade or better in all professional education courses; and completion of portfolio checkpoints 1 and 2; and current pre-professional liability insurance; and program approval.

    This course is designed to meet HB 1711 for student's experience as a Teacher's Aide or Assistant Rule (Rule 5 CSR 80-805.040), to that of conventional student teachers within the same program. It is also designed to support completion of additional clinical requirements within that program including: seminars and workshops, required meetings, school related activities appropriate to the assignment, demonstrated mastery of the MoSPE standards and completion and overall assessment of a Professional Preparation Portfolio. This course is credited only on BSEd or appropriate master's-level certification programs. Can only receive credit for one of the following: AGE 499, AGT 499, ART 469, COM 493, ECE 499, ELE 499, ENG 434, CTE 498, HST 499, KIN 498, LCR 491, MID 499, MTH 496, MUS 499, SCI 499, SEC 499, SPE 499, THE 493.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    4Fall, Spring
  • HST 504 Global Terrorism

    Terrorism and terrorist incidents are occurring globally almost on daily basis. This sad development is making terrorism is one of the defining factors of this century. This course aims to educate students on why there are so many terrorist groups today, terrorists' motivations, means and methods as well as how to combat terrorism. The course aims at equipping leaders of tomorrow with the right knowledge and skills in dealing with the phenomenon of terrorism.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 509 Indian History

    50 hours.

    History of Indian/White relations, federal Indian policy, and Indian accommodation to European introductions and eventual American dominance from the beginning of contact with Europeans to the present. May be taught concurrently with HST 609. Cannot receive credit for both HST 509 and HST 609.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • HST 510 The Plains Indians

    50 hours.

    History and culture of Plains Indians from the pre-Columbian period to the end of the frontier era near the turn of the last century, including the impact of the European invasion. May be taught concurrently with HST 611. Cannot receive credit for both HST 510 and HST 611.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • HST 514 17th-19th Century British Atlantic

    50 hours.

    Study of the British Empire in the 17th-19th century Atlantic World. Topics will include the Enlightenment; mercantilism and free-trade economics; migration, including the American Revolution Loyalist diaspora; the rise and fall of privateering, the Sugar Interest, and the Atlantic slave trade; slavery abolition and post-emancipation society in the West Indies; and Canadian confederation and home rule. May be taught concurrently with HST 614. Cannot receive credit for both HST 514 and HST 614.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 515 American Environmental History

    50 hours.

    Survey of humankind's relationship with nature and the environment in what is now the United States from pre-Columbian times to the present. Will especially focus on the impact of American development on the environment, the impact of the environment on the development of the United States, and the significance of the many different ideas and images concerning nature and the environment throughout American history. May be taught concurrently with HST 615. Cannot receive credit for both HST 515 and HST 615.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 516 American Religious History

    50 hours.

    Impact of religious thought and religious leaders on the history of the United States. May be taught concurrently with HST 616. Cannot receive credit for both HST 516 and HST 616.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • HST 517 Legal and Constitutional History of the United States

    50 hours.

    The origins of American constitutionalism, The Philadelphia Convention, the historical context of the changes in the law, in the Constitution, and in the courts since 1789, and the development of the law profession and legal education. May be taught concurrently with HST 617. Cannot receive credit for both HST 517 and HST 617.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 518 Colonial America

    50 hours.

    Character, development and modification of the English Empire in North America. May be taught concurrently with HST 618. Cannot receive credit for both HST 518 and HST 618.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 519 The American Revolution

    50 hours.

    Origins of the Revolution, War of Independence, and the society, government, and economy of the Revolutionary and Confederation eras. May be taught concurrently with HST 619. Cannot receive credit for both HST 519 and HST 619.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 521 Early American Republic

    50 hours.

    Study of America, 1780s-1840s. Topics will include the development of constitutional government and federalism, mix of republican ideology and capitalism, causes and results of the War of 1812, first and second political party systems, social reform, and economic development. May be taught concurrently with HST 621. Cannot receive credit for both HST 521 and HST 621.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 523 Nineteenth Century America

    50 hours.

    Emphasis upon how the ideas and values that constituted the original meaning of America (namely, the republicanism of the American Revolution) were transformed in response to the Commercial and Industrial Revolutions of nineteenth century America, producing two major crises of the century: the Civil War and Populist Revolt. Included is the transition of the United States from an agrarian society of economically and politically independent farmers to a depersonalized industrial nation of largely dependent salaried employees and wage earners. May be taught concurrently with HST 623. Cannot receive credit for both HST 523 and HST 623.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 524 Civil War and Reconstruction

    50 hours.

    The sectional conflict, the Civil War, and Reconstruction examined from political, military, social, and economic perspectives, with emphasis on differing historical interpretations of the causes of the war, the South's defeat, and the limits of Reconstruction. May be taught concurrently with HST 624. Cannot receive credit for both HST 524 and HST 624.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 525 Gilded Age/Progressive Era America, 1865-1920

    50 hours.

    Political, economic, social and intellectual development of the United States from the end of the Civil War through World War I and its aftermath. May be taught concurrently with HST 625. Cannot receive credit for both HST 525 and HST 625.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 528 U.S. History Since 1945

    50 hours.

    The Cold War, politics from Truman through the Reagan presidency; the social conflict of the 1960s; the civil rights movement; the Great Society; Vietnam; and the Reagan revolution. May be taught concurrently with HST 628. Cannot receive credit for both HST 528 and HST 628.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 529 Plagues and Pandemics

    50 hours.

    This is a history of disease, especially epidemic disease, in western and world history. The first half of the course looks at disease from ancient times to the last half of the 19th century. The second half concentrates on the period from about 1890 to the present. The focus in the first half is on how people understood disease and how this shaped treatments. The second half focuses of the fundamental changes to disease pools brought about by the creation of thick global networks, increasing urbanization, and dramatic population increases. In terms of treatment, the focus will shift toward the development of germ theory, public health, and scientific medicine. May be taught concurrently with HST 629. Cannot receive credit for both HST 529 and HST 629.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • HST 531 African American Leaders and Movements

    50 hours.

    Study of African American leaders and movements in the United States, with emphasis on the period since World War II. Identical with AAS 531. Cannot receive credit for both HST 531 and AAS 531. May be taught concurrently with HST 631. Cannot receive credit for both HST 531 and HST 631.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 532 History of Ancient Egypt

    History of ancient Egypt from its unification in approximately 3200 BCE through 500 CE. Foundation of this course is the political history of ancient Egypt, but special attention is paid to particular social history topics, such as the origins of monotheism during the Amarna Period, interactions with the outside world (especially with the ancient Near East, Nubia, and Classical Greece and Rome) and varied topics relating to daily life (e.g. early medicine and science, education, personal piety). A particular emphasis is placed on primary sources in translation and archaeological evidence. Identical with AAS 532 . Cannot receive credit for both AAS 532  and HST 532. May be taught concurrently with HST 632. Cannot receive credit for both HST 532 and HST 632.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 536 History of Missouri

    50 hours.

    Economic, social, political and constitutional history of the state; role played by Missouri in national affairs. May be taught concurrently with HST 636. Cannot receive credit for both HST 536 and HST 636.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 537 History of the American West

    50 hours.

    Westward movement in America as history and myth; influence of the West on American society and character. May be taught concurrently with HST 637. Cannot receive credit for both HST 537 and HST 637.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 538 History of the American South, 1607-Present

    50 hours.

    Development of the South's social, economic and intellectual distinctiveness, with an emphasis on slavery, the plantation system, sectional conflict, modernization, Populism, disfranchisement, segregation, Dixie Demagogues and the Civil Rights Movement. May be taught concurrently with HST 638. Cannot receive credit for both HST 538 and HST 638.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 541 The Ancient Near East to 1200 BCE

    50 hours.

    Sumerians, Babylonians, Egyptians and Hittites; special reference to Hebrew scripture. Interrelationships among ancient civilizations; readings from original sources in English translation. May be taught concurrently with HST 641. Cannot receive credit for both HST 541 and HST 641.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • HST 542 Ancient Israel

    50 hours.

    History of Israel to the end of the Persian period with special reference to the Canaanites, Mycenaeans, Philistines, Phoenicians, Assyrians, Chaldeans, and Persians. May be taught concurrently with HST 642. Cannot receive credit for both HST 542 and HST 642.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • HST 543 Nationalism, Sectarianism, and Conflict in the Middle East

    50 hours.

    This course will focus on the origins and development of various ethnonational and sectarian conflicts in the Middle East during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This includes the Armenian question, the Israeli-Palestinian dispute, and the Kurdish issue. May be taught concurrently with HST 643. Cannot receive credit for both HST 543 and HST 643.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 545 Medieval Europe

    50 hours.

    This course explores the history of Europe between the 5th and 15th centuries, from the collapse of the Western Roman Empire to the end of the Hundred Years War. Topics covered include the Germanic migrations; the spread of Christianity; the rise and fall of the Carolingian Empire; monastic life; feudal monarchy in France and England; conflicts between secular and ecclesiastical authority; the crusades; heresy and the papal inquisition; Jewish, Christian, and Muslim interaction; the movement of people, objects, and ideas between Europe and neighboring regions; and the Black Death and other crises of the late Middle Ages. May be taught concurrently with HST 645. Cannot receive credit for both HST 545 and HST 645.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • HST 548 The Renaissance

    50 hours.

    Europe from about 1320 to about 1550, in the transition period from Medieval civilization to Modern Civilization; history of ideas and culture. May be taught concurrently with HST 648. Cannot receive credit for both HST 548 and HST 648.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 549 The Reformation

    50 hours.

    Early modern period of European history, 1500-1648. Religious controversy, religious wars, growth of the secular state. May be taught concurrently with HST 649. Cannot receive credit for both HST 549 and HST 649.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 553 History of Europe in the 19th Century, 1815-1918

    50 hours.

    Forces unleashed by the French Revolution and other movements, including liberalism, reaction, nationalism, industrialization, and imperialism. May be taught concurrently with HST 653. Cannot receive credit for both HST 553 and HST 653.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 555 Europe in the 20th Century

    50 hours.

    History of Europe from the First World War. Topics will include the persistence of war and violence in contemporary European history, the evolution of the state and economy during eras of crisis and growth, and the transformation of European society and culture across the 20th century. May be taught concurrently with HST 655. Cannot receive credit for both HST 555 and HST 655.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 559 Germany, 1815-Present

    50 hours.

    The unification process, the German Empire, Weimar Republic, Third Reich, Germany as a European Great Power. May be taught concurrently with HST 659. Cannot receive credit for both HST 559 and HST 659.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 562 Communism in Eastern Europe, 1917-1990

    50 hours.

    This course examines the emergence, development and demise of communist regimes in Eastern Europe. Conceived as a multi-disciplinary class, the course will look at a wide range of topics including, but not limited to, the creation of the police state, economic and social developments and the position of intellectuals, women and young people in communist societies, the "velvet revolutions" and the collapse of the system in the late 1980s. Special emphasis will be placed on culture, including literature and film as vehicles of protest against oppression.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 563 History of Fascism

    50 hours.

    This course deals mainly with interwar fascist movements and regimes in Europe and examines such relevant questions as the intellectual origins of fascism; paramilitary violence after WWI; charismatic leadership; state terrorism; fascist art and propaganda; social policy; imperialism and war and genocide. It also examines the history of Right radical, fascist and post-fascist movement and regimes in Europe, Latin America (Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru), United States, South Africa, the Middle East (Egypt, Syria and Iraq) and Africa (Ghana, Nigeria, Congo, Uganda) after 1945. May be taught concurrently with HST 663. Cannot receive credit for both HST 563 and HST 663.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 564 History of the Holocaust

    50 hours.

    Envisioned as a multi-disciplinary class, this course examines the complex history of the Holocaust during the Second World War. It discusses such important topics as the life of Jewish communities in Germany and Eastern Europe before 1933; Jewish emancipation; the rise of political anti-Semitism; Hitler and the creation of the Third Reich; discrimination against racial outsiders and "asocials"; the life of Jews in Nazi Germany; the "twisted road to Auschwitz"; the historical debates on the origins of the genocide; the social and psychological make-up of the perpetrators; the role of bystanders both in Germany and other parts of Europe; Jewish resistance and finally the memory of the Holocaust in Germany, Israel, United States and Eastern Europe. May be taught concurrently with HST 664. Cannot receive credit for both HST 564 and HST 664.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 566 Victorian and Edwardian England

    50 hours.

    This course will examine the impact of industrialization; wealth, poverty and the rise of class; reform movements; origins of the welfare state; emergence of the Labour party, and the slow eclipse of aristocratic power and influence. May be taught concurrently with HST 666. Cannot receive credit for both HST 566 and HST 666.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 567 Race and Gender in the British Empire

    In the aftermath of Brexit and with new attention directed to the legacies of colonization in and outside the classroom by movements such as Black Lives Matter, the history of the British Empire has become increasingly scrutinized. This course seeks to dispel the myths of imperial nostalgia and white exceptionalism by offering new approaches to doing imperial history, specifically through the lens of race and gender. Course will prioritize otherwise-silenced voices of women, as well as Black and indigenous persons of color. Course will seek to examine the formation of identities between colonizer and the colonized, and how these racialized and gendered identities were constantly challenged over time. May be taught concurrently with HST 667. Cannot receive credit for both HST 567 and HST 667.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 569 The Material Worlds of Antiquity: Archaeology and Ancient History

    The study of the past is built largely upon written sources -- i.e. histories, decrees, tax receipts, wills, letters, religious literature. In fact, for many "History" begins with writing, regulating earlier human events to the category of "prehistory". Whether "prehistoric" or "historic", however, texts only provide partial insight into the ancient world and its inhabitants. Archaeology has become an invaluable tool for histories of all periods, but especially for ancient history. This course seeks to better understand ancient history -- specifically, the histories of Egypt, the Near East, Greece, and Rome -- from an archaeological perspective. This course is not a survey, but rather will focus on particular historical moments, people, and places, relying on archaeological evidence to elucidate and/or complicate ancient histories. Texts will still be considered, but will be treated as artifacts alongside other objects, monuments, and sites from antiquity. In addition to learning about the histories of ancient peoples from across the Mediterranean, Middle East, and North Africa, this course will also introduce students to archaeological theories, practices, and technologies, as they relate to the study of the ancient past. May be taught concurrently with HST 669. May not receive credit for both HST 569 and HST 669.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 571 China in the Twentieth Century

    50 hours.

    An intensive study of the transformation of China from a Confucian, Feudal state to a Communist world power. May be taught concurrently with HST 671. Cannot receive credit for both HST 571 and HST 671.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 572 Gender and Sexuality in Modern East Asia

    This course explores the formation, institutionalization, and ongoing negotiation of gendered discourses and practices in China, Japan, and Korea from the late imperial period until the present. Drawing on a range of sources, including literature, images, and films, students will analyze the ways in which changing conceptions of gender and sexuality have informed the legal system, medicine, political movements, and economic formations in East Asia, among others. May be taught concurrently with HST 672. Cannot receive credit for both HST 572 and HST 672.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 574 Jordan Archaeology Education Abroad

    permission of instructor.

    This course is a formal archaeological field school--with field, lab, and classroom components--held on-site in Jordan as an Education Abroad opportunity in the summers. The field school provides hands-on training in archaeological excavation and post-season object analysis techniques; students will also participate in several projects related to site presentation, architectural preservation, and community outreach that are running concurrently with the project. The field school rotates between the Tall Hisban excavations and the Northern Jordan Project (NJP), held at each site in alternative summers. Excursions to sites of archaeological, historical, religious, and cultural interest are organized on weekends. The program, depending on the research objectives that year, will run 3-6 weeks. May be taught concurrently with HST 674. Cannot receive credit for both HST 574 and HST 674.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    3Summer
  • HST 587 Mexico from Colony to Nation

    50 hours.

    Mexican history from the colonial period to the Revolution of 1910. May be taught concurrently with HST 682. Cannot receive credit for both HST 587 and HST 682.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 588 Twentieth-Century Mexico

    50 hours.

    Mexico from the Revolution of 1910 to the present, emphasizing Mexico's influence upon the Cuban Nicaraguan and other revolutions; its role as a member of the Middle American Community and of Latin America at large. May be taught concurrently with HST 688. Cannot receive credit for both HST 588 and HST 688.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 597 Topics in History

    50 hours.

    The topics studied will change from term to term depending on the interests of professors and students. Variable content course. May be repeated as topics change. May be taught concurrently with HST 697. Cannot receive credit for both HST 597 and HST 697.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • HST 598 Senior Seminar in History

    HST 390; and Writing II or concurrent enrollment; and 90 hours.

    Concentrated study of a sharply focused topic and the preparation of a bachelor's paper based on primary research. Course content varies each semester. Required for the BA in History. This course is strongly recommended for anyone considering graduate school. Graduating seniors are given enrollment priority. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • HST 599 Internship in Public History

    60 hours and permission of the department head and host institution.

    Supervised and approved work in a public or private agency which manages a museum, archive, or historic sites. One credit hour is awarded for each 40 hours of service. May be repeated for credit but only three hours may be counted towards the BA, BSEd, or MA major in History. May be taught concurrently with HST 698. Cannot receive credit for both HST 599 and HST 698.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • HST 609 Indian History

    History of Indian/White relations, federal Indian policy, and Indian accommodation to European introductions and eventual American dominance from the beginning of contact with Europeans to the present. May be taught concurrently with HST 509. Cannot receive credit for both HST 509 and HST 609.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • HST 611 The Plains Indians

    History and culture of Plains Indians from the pre-Columbian period to the end of the frontier era near the turn of the last century, including the impact of the European invasion. May be taught concurrently with HST 510. Cannot receive credit for both HST 510 and HST 611.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • HST 614 17th-19th Century British Atlantic

    Study of the British Empire in the 17th-19th century Atlantic World. Topics will include the Enlightenment; mercantilism and free-trade economics; migration, including the American Revolution Loyalist diaspora; the rise and fall of privateering, the Sugar Interest, and the Atlantic slave trade; slavery abolition and post-emancipation society in the West Indies; and Canadian confederation and home rule. May be taught concurrently with HST 514. Cannot receive credit for both HST 514 and HST 614.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 615 American Environmental History

    Survey of humankind's relationship with nature and the environment in what is now the United States from pre-Columbian times to the present. Will especially focus on the impact of American development on the environment, the impact of the environment on the development of the United States, and the significance of the many different ideas and images concerning nature and the environment throughout American history. May be taught concurrently with HST 515. Cannot receive credit for both HST 515 and HST 615.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 616 American Religious History

    Impact of religious thought and religious leaders on the history of the United States. May be taught concurrently with HST 516. Cannot receive credit for both HST 516 and HST 616.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • HST 617 Legal and Constitutional History of the United States

    The origins of American constitutionalism, The Philadelphia Convention, the historical context of the changes in the law, in the Constitution, and in the courts since 1789, and the development of the law profession and legal education. May be taught concurrently with HST 517. Cannot receive credit for both HST 517 and HST 617.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 618 Colonial America

    Character, development and modification of the English Empire in North America. May be taught concurrently with HST 518. Cannot receive credit for both HST 518 and HST 618.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 619 The American Revolution

    Origins of the Revolution, War of Independence, and the society, government, and economy of the Revolutionary and Confederation eras. May be taught concurrently with HST 519. Cannot receive credit for both HST 519 and HST 619.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 621 Early American Republic

    Study of America, 1780s-1840s. Topics will include the development of constitutional government and federalism, mix of republican ideology and capitalism, causes and results of the War of 1812, first and second political party systems, social reform, and economic development. May be taught concurrently with HST 521. Cannot receive credit for both HST 521 and HST 621.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 623 Nineteenth Century America

    Emphasis upon how the ideas and values that constituted the original meaning of America (namely, the republicanism of the American Revolution) were transformed in response to the Commercial and Industrial Revolutions of nineteenth century America, producing two major crises of the century: the Civil War and Populist Revolt. Included is the transition of the United States from an agrarian society of economically and politically independent farmers to a depersonalized industrial nation of largely dependent salaried employees and wage earners. May be taught concurrently with HST 523. Cannot receive credit for both HST 523 and HST 623.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 624 Civil War and Reconstruction

    The sectional conflict, the Civil War, and Reconstruction examined from political, military, social, and economic perspectives, with emphasis on differing historical interpretations of the causes of the war, the South's defeat, and the limits of Reconstruction. May be taught concurrently with HST 524. Cannot receive credit for both HST 524 and HST 624.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 625 Gilded Age/Progressive Era America, 1865-1920

    Political, economic, social and intellectual development of the United States from the end of the Civil War through World War I and its aftermath. May be taught concurrently with HST 525. Cannot receive credit for both HST 525 and HST 625.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 628 U.S. History Since 1945

    The Cold War, politics from Truman through the Reagan presidency; the social conflict of the 1960s; the civil rights movement; the Great Society; Vietnam; and the Reagan revolution. May be taught concurrently with HST 528. Cannot receive credit for both HST 528 and HST 628.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 629 Plagues and Pandemics

    This is a history of disease, especially epidemic disease, in western and world history. The first half of the course looks at disease from ancient times to the last half of the 19th century. The second half concentrates on the period from about 1890 to the present. The focus in the first half is on how people understood disease and how this shaped treatments. The second half focuses of the fundamental changes to disease pools brought about by the creation of thick global networks, increasing urbanization, and dramatic population increases. In terms of treatment, the focus will shift toward the development of germ theory, public health, and scientific medicine. May be taught concurrently with HST 529. Cannot receive credit for both HST 529 and HST 629.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • HST 631 African American Leaders and Movements

    Study of African American leaders and movements in the United States, with emphasis on the period since World War II. May be taught concurrently with HST 531. Cannot receive credit for both HST 531 and HST 631.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 632 History of Ancient Egypt

    History of ancient Egypt from its unification in approximately 3200 BCE through 500 CE. Foundation of this course is the political history of ancient Egypt, but special attention is paid to particular social history topics, such as the origins of monotheism during the Amarna Period, interactions with the outside world (especially with the ancient Near East, Nubia, and Classical Greece and Rome) and varied topics relating to daily life (e.g. early medicine and science, education, personal piety). A particular emphasis is placed on primary sources in translation and archaeological evidence. May be taught concurrently with AAS 532 and HST 532. Cannot receive credit for AAS 532 and HST 532 and HST 632.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 636 History of Missouri

    Economic, social, political and constitutional history of the state; role played by Missouri in national affairs. May be taught concurrently with HST 536. Cannot receive credit for both HST 536 and HST 636.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 637 History of the American West

    Westward movement in America as history and myth; influence of the West on American society and character. May be taught concurrently with HST 537. Cannot receive credit for both HST 537 and HST 637.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 638 History of the American South, 1607-Present

    Development of the South's social, economic and intellectual distinctiveness, with an emphasis on slavery, the plantation system, sectional conflict, modernization, Populism, disfranchisement, segregation, Dixie Demagogues and the Civil Rights Movement. May be taught concurrently with HST 538. Cannot receive credit for both HST 538 and HST 638.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 641 The Ancient Near East to 1200 BCE

    Sumerians, Babylonians, Egyptians and Hittites; special reference to Hebrew scripture. Interrelationships among ancient civilizations; readings from original sources in English translation. May be taught concurrently with HST 541. Cannot receive credit for both HST 541 and HST 641.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • HST 642 Ancient Israel

    History of Israel to the end of the Persian period with special reference to the Canaanites, Mycenaeans, Philistines, Phoenicians, Assyrians, Chaldeans, and Persians. May be taught concurrently with HST 542. Cannot receive credit for both HST 542 and HST 642.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • HST 643 Nationalism, Sectarianism, and Conflict in the Middle East

    This course will focus on the origins and development of various ethnonational and sectarian conflicts in the Middle East during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This includes the Armenian question, the Israeli-Palestinian dispute, and the Kurdish issue. May be taught concurrently with HST 543. Cannot receive credit for both HST 543 and HST 643.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 645 Medieval Europe

    This course explores the history of Europe between the 5th and 15th centuries, from the collapse of the Western Roman Empire to the end of the Hundred Years War. Topics covered include the Germanic migrations; the spread of Christianity; the rise and fall of the Carolingian Empire; monastic life; feudal monarchy in France and England; conflicts between secular and ecclesiastical authority; the crusades; heresy and the papal inquisition; Jewish, Christian, and Muslim interaction; the movement of people, objects, and ideas between Europe and neighboring regions; and the Black Death and other crises of the late Middle Ages. May be taught concurrently with HST 545. Cannot receive credit for both HST 545 and HST 645.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • HST 648 The Renaissance

    Europe from about 1320 to about 1550, in the transition period from Medieval civilization to Modern Civilization; history of ideas and culture. May be taught concurrently with HST 548. Cannot receive credit for both HST 548 and HST 648.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 649 The Reformation

    Early modern period of European history, 1500-1648. Religious controversy, religious wars, growth of the secular state. May be taught concurrently with HST 549. Cannot receive credit for both HST 549 and HST 649.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 653 History of Europe in the 19th Century, 1815-1918

    Forces unleashed by the French Revolution and other movements, including liberalism, reaction, nationalism, industrialization, and imperialism. May be taught concurrently with HST 553. Cannot receive credit for both HST 553 and HST 653.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 655 Europe in the 20th Century

    History of Europe from the First World War. Topics will include the persistence of war and violence in contemporary European history, the evolution of the state and economy during eras of crisis and growth, and the transformation of European society and culture across the 20th century. May be taught concurrently with HST 555. Cannot receive credit for both HST 555 and HST 655.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 659 Germany, 1815-Present

    The unification process, the German Empire, Weimar Republic, Third Reich, Germany as a European Great Power. May be taught concurrently with HST 559. Cannot receive credit for both HST 559 and HST 659.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 663 History of Fascism

    This course deals mainly with interwar fascist movements and regimes in Europe and examines such relevant questions as the intellectual origins of fascism; paramilitary violence after WWI; charismatic leadership; state terrorism; fascist art and propaganda; social policy; imperialism and war and genocide. It also examines the history of Right radical, fascist and post-fascist movement and regimes in Europe, Latin America (Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru), United States, South Africa, the Middle East (Egypt, Syria and Iraq) and Africa (Ghana, Nigeria, Congo, Uganda) after 1945. May be taught concurrently with HST 563. Cannot receive credit for both HST 563 and HST 663.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 664 History of the Holocaust

    Envisioned as a multi-disciplinary class, this course examines the complex history of the Holocaust during the Second World War. It discusses such important topics as the life of Jewish communities in Germany and Eastern Europe before 1933; Jewish emancipation; the rise of political anti-Semitism; Hitler and the creation of the Third Reich; discrimination against racial outsiders and "asocials"; the life of Jews in Nazi Germany; the "twisted road to Auschwitz"; the historical debates on the origins of the genocide; the social and psychological make-up of the perpetrators; the role of bystanders both in Germany and other parts of Europe; Jewish resistance and finally the memory of the Holocaust in Germany, Israel, United States and Eastern Europe. May be taught concurrently with HST 564. Cannot receive credit for both HST 564 and HST 664.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 666 Victorian and Edwardian England

    This course will examine the impact of industrialization; wealth, poverty and the rise of class; reform movements; origins of the welfare state; emergence of the Labour party, and the slow eclipse of aristocratic power and influence. May be taught concurrently with HST 566. Cannot receive credit for both HST 566 and HST 666.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 667 Race and Gender in the British Empire

    In the aftermath of Brexit and with new attention directed to the legacies of colonization in and outside the classroom by movements such as Black Lives Matter, the history of the British Empire has become increasingly scrutinized. This course seeks to dispel the myths of imperial nostalgia and white exceptionalism by offering new approaches to doing imperial history, specifically through the lens of race and gender. Couse will prioritize otherwise-silenced voices of women, as well as Black and indigenous persons of color. Course will seek to examine the formation of identities between colonizer and the colonized, and how these racialized and gendered identities were constantly challenged over time. May be taught concurrently with HST 567. Cannot receive credit for both HST 567 and HST 667.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 669 The Material Worlds of Antiquity: Archaeology and Ancient History

    The study of the past is built largely upon written sources -- i.e. histories, decrees, tax receipts, wills, letters, religious literature. In fact, for many "History" begins with writing, regulating earlier human events to the category of "prehistory". Whether "prehistoric" or "historic", however, texts only provide partial insight into the ancient world and its inhabitants. Archaeology has become an invaluable tool for histories of all periods, but especially for ancient history. This course seeks to better understand ancient history -- specifically, the histories of Egypt, the Near East, Greece, and Rome -- from an archaeological perspective and at a graduate level. This course is not a survey, but rather will focus on particular historical moments, people, and places, relying on archaeological evidence to elucidate and/or complicate ancient histories. Texts will still be considered, but will be treated as artifacts alongside other objects, monuments, and sites from antiquity. In addition to learning about the histories of ancient peoples from across the Mediterranean, Middle East, and North Africa, this course will also introduce graduate students to archaeological theories, practices, and technologies, as they relate to the study of the ancient past. May be taught concurrently with HST 569. May not receive credit for both HST 569 and HST 669.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 671 China in the Twentieth Century

    An intensive study of the transformation of China from a Confucian, Feudal state to a Communist world power. May be taught concurrently with HST 571. Cannot receive credit for both HST 571 and HST 671.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 672 Gender and Sexuality in Modern East Asia

    This course explores the formation, institutionalization, and ongoing negotiation of gendered discourses and practices in China, Japan, and Korea from the late imperial period until the present. Drawing on a range of sources, including literature, images, and films, students will analyze the ways in which changing conceptions of gender and sexuality have informed the legal system, medicine, political movements, and economic formations in East Asia, among others. May be taught concurrently with HST 572. Cannot receive credit for both HST 572 and HST 672.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 674 Jordan Archaeology Education Abroad

    permission of instructor.

    This course is a formal archaeological field school--with field, lab, and classroom components--held on-site in Jordan as an Education Abroad opportunity in the summers. The field school provides hands-on training in archaeological excavation and post-season object analysis techniques; students will also participate in several projects related to site presentation, architectural preservation, and community outreach that are running concurrently with the project. The field school rotates between the Tall Hisban excavations and the Northern Jordan Project (NJP), held at each site in alternative summers. Excursions to sites of archaeological, historical, religious, and cultural interest are organized on weekends. The program, depending on the research objectives that year, will run 3-6 weeks. May be taught concurrently with HST 574. Cannot receive credit for both HST 574 and HST 674.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    3Summer
  • HST 682 Mexico from Colony to Nation

    Mexican history from the colonial period to the Revolution of 1910. May be taught concurrently with HST 587. Cannot receive credit for both HST 587 and HST 682.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 688 Twentieth-Century Mexico

    Mexico from the Revolution of 1910 to the present, emphasizing Mexico's influence upon the Cuban Nicaraguan and other revolutions; its role as a member of the Middle American Community and of Latin America at large. May be taught concurrently with HST 588. Cannot receive credit for both HST 588 and HST 688.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 697 Topics in History

    The topics studied will change from term to term depending on the interests of professors and students. Variable content course. May be repeated as topics change. May be taught concurrently with HST 597. Cannot receive credit for both HST 597 and HST 697.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • HST 698 Internship in Public History

    permission of department head.

    Supervised and approved work in a public or private agency which manages a museum, archive, or historic sites. One credit hour is awarded for each 40 hours of service. May be repeated for credit but only three hours may be counted towards the MA History. May be taught concurrently with HST 599. Cannot receive credit for both HST 599 and HST 698.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • HST 701 Historiography and Historical Method

    Various philosophies of history and theories concerning method, purpose and meaning of history; problems of research.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • HST 702 Secondary School Curriculum for the Social Studies

    Foundation course in the development and organization of the secondary school curriculum with an emphasis toward issues within social studies curriculum. This course meets the MSED degree requirements for social studies or history majors only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 710 Ancient History Research Seminar

    HST 701.

    A seminar in ancient history, providing a study in depth of a chosen topic as well as the historiography of the topic for the graduate student. May be repeated once for credit.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 720 American History Readings Seminar

    Readings in chosen periods and topics in American History for the graduate student. May be repeated once for credit.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 723 American Civil War Readings Seminar

    This seminar introduces graduate students to recent historical scholarship on the era of the American Civil War. Among the major themes covered are the relationships between soldiers and civilians, slavery and emancipation, politics, and the war's impacts upon human health and the environment. Although these readings focus largely upon the war years of 1861 to 1865, the course also examines the sectional crisis, the contested period of postwar Reconstruction, and subsequent struggles over Civil War memory.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • HST 724 American Empire Readings Seminar

    This readings course introduces the graduate student to the history of American Empire, examining the ideological, political, economic, and social aspects of American expansion from colonial times to the present. The course also explores how diverse groups participated in and reacted to expansion, including the roles of race, gender, class, and religion.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 725 Ozarks History Readings Seminar

    Readings in the history of the Ozarks for the graduate student.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 726 African-American History Readings Seminar

    HST 701 .

    Readings in chosen periods and topics in African-American history for the graduate student. May be repeated once for credit.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 730 American History Research Seminar

    HST 701.

    In-depth study of a chosen topic as well as the historiography of the topic for graduate students.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 740 European History Readings Seminar

    Readings in chosen periods and topics in European history for the graduate student. May be repeated once for credit.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 750 European History Research Seminar

    HST 701.

    In-depth study of a chosen topic as well as the historiography of the topic for the graduate student. May be repeated for credit with department consent.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 760 Latin American History Readings Seminar

    Readings in chosen periods and topics in Iberian and Latin American history for the graduate student. May be repeated once for credit.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 765 African History Readings

    HST 701 .

    This course offers readings in chosen periods and topics in African History for the graduate student. Topics could range from historical processes and themes, most especially the abolition of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and its impact on power, African Politics, Economic History of Africa; the European Conquest and how Africans negotiated and contested colonial rule; and Struggles of Decolonization and Independence in Africa, Terrorism in Africa, Nation Building in Post-Colonial Africa, Political Instability and Economic Development, etc. On the other hand, the course explores the history of Precolonial, Colonial and Postcolonial Africa as a field of inquiry, the major historiographical debates that have emerged since independence. Lastly, the course problematizes classic works, examines new ones and explores innovative areas of knowledge as well as experiments with a few new methodologies and source materials employed by African historians. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 770 Ancient History Readings Seminar

    Readings in chosen periods and topics in Ancient history for graduate student. May be repeated once for credit.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 775 Middle Eastern History Readings Seminar

    Readings in chosen periods and topics in Middle Eastern history for the graduate student. May be repeated once for credit.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 776 Asian History Readings Seminar

    Readings in chosen periods and topics in Asian history for the graduate student. May be repeated once for credit.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 780 World History Research Seminar

    HST 701.

    In-depth study, in African, East Asian, Latin American, or Middle Eastern history, of a chosen topic as well as the historiography of the topic for the graduate student. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with departmental consent.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • HST 783 Women's History Primary Source Seminar

    Students will study seminal primary and secondary sources relating to women's history, discussing and analyzing their content, origins, and context in order to understand their application to the research, writing, and teaching of history.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 784 The American Revolution Primary Source Seminar

    Students will study seminal primary and secondary sources relating to the American Revolution, discussing and analyzing their content, origins, and context in order to understand their application to the research, writing, and teaching of history.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 785 The Civil War in Missouri Primary Source Seminar

    Students will study seminal primary and secondary sources relating to the Civil War in Missouri, discussing and analyzing their content, origins, and context in order to understand their application to the research, writing, and teaching of history.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 786 American Social History Primary Source Seminar

    Students will study seminal primary and secondary sources relating to American social history, discussing and analyzing their content, origins, and context in order to understand their application to the research, writing, and teaching of history.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 787 American Education Primary Source Seminar

    Students will study seminal primary and secondary sources relating to American education, discussing and analyzing their content, origins, and context in order to understand their application to the research, writing, and teaching of history.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 790 World History Readings Seminar

    Readings in chosen periods and topics in world history, comparative history, or a study involving at least two global areas such as diaspora studies. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 792 World History Primary Source Seminar

    Students will study seminal primary and secondary sources related to world history, discussing and analyzing their content, origins, and context in order to understand their application to the research, writing and teaching of history. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • HST 796 Readings in History

    permission of supervising professor and permission of department head.

    Arranged program of readings for the individual student directed by a professor of the graduate faculty. May be repeated once for credit.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • HST 799 Thesis

    permission of Director of History Graduate Program.

    Independent research and study connected with preparation of thesis.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand

Ozarks Studies (OZK) courses

  • OZK 150 Introduction to Ozarks Studies

    This course provides a multidisciplinary introduction to the study of the Ozarks region and its inhabitants, including Ozarks history and geography, regional folk culture and traditions, and current issues.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • OZK 300 Topics in Ozarks Studies

    In-depth inquiry into topics in Ozarks Studies. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours if the topic is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand