Finance, Economics and Risk Management Courses

Business (BUS) courses

  • BUS 135 Introduction to Business

    A survey of business which includes an evaluation of the social and economic environment in which it operates, followed by a look at business organization, management, finance, accounting, production, marketing, insurance, law, and data processing. Designed to serve three groups of students--those majoring in other departments who would like to develop a broad understanding of business through a single course; those who are undecided about a major and would like to explore business as a possibility; and those freshmen planning a major in some area of business who would like a broad understanding of business in order to make a specific selection of their major.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • BUS 200 Topics in Business

    A variable content course with topics that can change from semester to semester. Topics are identified by title in the class schedule. Examples are: Personal Budgeting, Residential Home Construction, Insurance for the Family, Personal Credit Management, and Business Ethics. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • BUS 303 History of Business

    undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    History of business; contributions of individuals and companies in evolution of modern business principles and practices.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    22Upon demand
  • BUS 305 Service-Learning in Business

    30 hours and concurrent registration in a Finance, Economics and Risk Management department course designated as a service-learning offering; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    This service component for an existing course incorporates community service with classroom instruction in business to provide an integrative learning experience that addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs. Includes 40 hours of service that benefits an external community organization, agency, or public service provider. Approved service placements and assignments will vary depending on the course topic and learning objectives; a list of approved placements and assignments is available from the instructor and the Citizenship and Service-Learning Office. May be repeated.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1Upon demand
  • BUS 307 Business in the Community

    undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Study and application of business within the community. Topics include: planning and management of organizations from the viewpoint of education, community, and business; development of new business; organizational structure; interpersonal skills; funding and allocation resources of private, public and non-profit organizations. Allows for direct contact with local community leaders in education and business as well as opportunity to develop individual skills. Group dynamics and individual initiative are emphasized. May be available with BUS 305 Service Learning option. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    2Upon demand
  • BUS 392 International Education Abroad in Business

    acceptance into the related Education Abroad program; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Offered in conjunction with an international Education Abroad program, this course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected companies and institutions in one or more international locations to be visited. This will address the economic, political, global, historical, social, ethical and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the international destination(s) to explore the culture and visit companies, institutions, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and discussion of the experience. The course involves research, written and oral reporting, and presentations. Group interaction based upon trust, respect, and integrity are required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • BUS 394 Cooperative Education in Business

    acceptance into Cooperative Education Program and permission of department head; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    The opportunity to earn academic credit in a planned learning process that integrates academic training with a supervised work experience. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • BUS 395 Domestic Field Experience in Business

    acceptance into the related field experience program; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Offered in conjunction with a domestic field experience through the Office of Education Abroad, this course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected companies and institutions in one or more U.S. financial center(s) (e.g. New York City) to be visited. This will address the economic, political, global, historical, social, ethical and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the destination(s) to explore the culture and visit companies, institutions, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and discussion of the experience. The course involves research, written and oral reporting, and presentations. Group interaction based upon trust, respect, and integrity are required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • BUS 397 Topics in Business

    undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    A variable content course with topics that can change from semester to semester. Topics are identified by title in the schedule of classes. Examples include: Employment Discrimination Law, Tax Planning for Real Estate Investments, and special courses in Insurance. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • BUS 494 Internship

    80 hours; academic preparation in the field of internship; permission of department head; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Opportunity to obtain practical understanding and professional growth through appropriate work experience with a cooperating business entity. Employment details and academic expectations must be instructor and company-approved prior to enrollment. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of three hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Fall, Spring, Summer
  • BUS 510 E-Business and Online Entrepreneurship

    54 hours; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    A study of e-business and online entrepreneurship from an applied, best practices point of view. Classroom visits by online entrepreneurs provide unique, real-world insights into the advantages, disadvantages, and challenges of doing business over the internet. May be taught concurrently with BUS 610. Cannot receive credit for both BUS 510 and BUS 610.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Summer
  • BUS 550 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business

    60 hours; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    A practical, skills-based study of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration from the business manager's perspective. This hands-on course is designed to develop the skills necessary to enable the business manager to effectively participate in negotiation, mediation, and arbitration as alternatives to litigation for resolving business disputes. Identical with LAW 550. May be taught concurrently with BUS 650. Cannot receive credit for more than one of BUS 550, BUS 650, LAW 550, or LAW 650.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • BUS 601 Foundations and Applications of Business Principles

    permission of the director of the Master of Professional Studies program.

    An exploration of business principles and their application. Designed for graduate students who do not have an undergraduate degree in business. This course may not be counted in the hours required for a College of Business undergraduate or graduate degree.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • BUS 610 E-Business and Online Entrepreneurship

    A study of e-business and online entrepreneurship from an applied, best practices point of view. Classroom visits by online entrepreneurs provide unique, real-world insights into the advantages, disadvantages, and challenges of doing business over the internet. May be taught concurrently with BUS 510. Cannot receive credit for both BUS 510 and BUS 610.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Summer
  • BUS 650 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business

    A practical, skills-based study of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration from the business manager's perspective. This hands-on course is designed to develop the skills necessary to enable the business manager to effectively participate in negotiation, mediation, and arbitration as alternatives to litigation for resolving business disputes. Identical with LAW 650. May be taught concurrently with BUS 550. Cannot receive credit for more than one of BUS 550, BUS 650, LAW 550, or LAW 650.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • BUS 790 Seminar in Contemporary Business Issues

    15 graduate hours and admission to a graduate program.

    A variable topics course focusing on contemporary issues in business. The course will include a significant writing/research project and presentation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • BUS 792 International Education Abroad in Business

    acceptance into the related Education Abroad program; and admission to a graduate program.

    Offered in conjunction with an international Education Abroad program, this course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected companies and institutions in one or more international locations to be visited. This will address the economic, political, global, historical, social, ethical and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the international destination(s) to explore the culture and visit companies, institutions, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and discussion of the experience. The course involves research, written and oral reporting, and presentations with graduate level proficiency. Group interactions based upon trust, respect, and integrity are required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • BUS 795 Domestic Field Experience in Business

    acceptance into the related field experience program; and admission to a graduate program.

    Offered in conjunction with a domestic field experience program through the Office of Education Abroad, this course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected companies and institutions in one or more major U.S. financial center(s) (e.g. New York City) to be visited. This will address the economic, political, global, historical, social, ethical and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the international destination(s) to explore the culture and visit companies, institutions, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and discussion of the experience. The course involves research, written and oral reporting, and presentations with graduate level proficiency. Group interactions based upon trust, respect, and integrity are required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand

Economics (ECO) courses

  • ECO 101 Economics of Social Issues

    12 hours.
    Focus on Public Issues

    This course focuses on understanding and analyzing major contemporary social issues such as globalization, pollution, poverty, income distribution, taxes, social security, the appropriate role of government, etc. Students will be introduced to the basic tools of economics so that they can develop a general framework within which a variety of political, social and economic issues can be analyzed. Issues will be discussed from a national, regional and local perspective.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, SummerECON 100 - Introduction to Economics.
  • ECO 155 Principles of Macroeconomics

    Focus on Social and Behavioral Sciences

    This course prepares the student to understand the economic structure of the United States and its place in the world economy, to interpret common economic measures, to understand the processes of governmental fiscal and monetary policies, and to evaluate individual decision-making from an economic perspective.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, SummerECON 101 - Introduction to Macroeconomics.
  • ECO 165 Principles of Microeconomics

    Focus on Social and Behavioral Sciences

    Basic principles of economics with a particular emphasis on the nature and application of those bearing on decision making within a household, firm or industry; including consideration of probles respecting the composition and pricing of the national output, distribution of income, pricing and output of factors of production and foreign trade.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, SummerECON 102 - Introduction to Microeconomics.
  • ECO 303 Behavioral Economics and Public Policy

    undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    This course examines solutions to public policy using behavioral economics, in particular the use of "nudges". These solutions often cost less, work as or more effectively, and can sometimes be seen as more ethical than traditional market solutions to problems such as fines, taxes and subsidies. The ethics of such policies is discussed. Topics may include how to increase the availability of organs such as kidneys, increase the savings rate of Americans, reducing the negative impacts human have on the environment, and ways to improve health in the United States.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Upon demand
  • ECO 304 Behavioral Economics

    ECO 165; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    This course serves as an introduction to behavioral economics. Behavioral economics uses more psychological and biological foundations than traditional neoclassical economics. The course explains why individuals often systematically deviate from neoclassical predictions and utilizes alternative models that more accurately describe human behavior.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • ECO 310 Labor Economics

    ECO 155 and ECO 165; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Factors determining the market for labor; examination of the economic effects of trade unions; recent trends in the labor force and the labor share of national income.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • ECO 315 The Economics of Gender

    ECO 165.

    This course teaches students to analyze the economic decisions made by both males and females in two main areas: the labor market and the household. Specific areas of inquiry include the following: the family as an economic unit, gender differences in labor force participation, occupational gender segregation, explanations for gender earnings differentials and efforts to reduce such differentials, gender earnings discrimination, and international gender issues. Identical with GST 315. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 315 and GST 315.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • ECO 316 Sports and Entertainment Economics

    ECO 101  or ECO 165 ; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program. 

    Microeconomic tools used to examine a wide variety of topics pertaining to the sports and entertainment industry such as monopoly and monopsony market structure, labor market issues including free agency and salary caps, and public policy concerns involving the impacts of sports and entertainment on the economy. Also includes an examination of the economics of various forms of media and entertainment including movies, cable, music, amusement parks, and casinos.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Summer
  • ECO 320 American Economic History

    ECO 101  or ECO 155 or ECO 165; HST 121 or HST 122; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    An examination of economic conditions and policies in America's past. Selected events are analyzed using principles drawn from economic theory, including: U.S. economic development, the origins of antitrust policy, and the New Deal.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • ECO 346 International Economic Development

    ECO 155 and ECO 165; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Theory of economic growth and development, with emphasis on developing economies and the techniques for understanding and promoting development.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall (odd-numbered years)
  • ECO 365 Intermediate Microeconomics

    ECO 165 and completion of General Education Quantitative Literacy requirement; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program. 

    Maximizing behavior of households and firms; theory of price and output determination under various market structures; distribution theory; introduction to general equilibrium analysis.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • ECO 385 Intermediate Macroeconomics

    ECO 155; and completion of General Education Quantitative Literacy requirement; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    The study of macroeconomic theory and policy. Models are developed which provide a framework for the discussion of macroeconomic issues and the policy choices decision makers face.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • ECO 390 Intersession Topics in Economics

    undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Specific subject matter will change from semester to semester, depending on the interests of professors and students. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours, as course topics change.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • ECO 392 Education Abroad in Economics

    acceptance into the related Education Abroad program; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Offered in conjunction with an international Education Abroad program, this course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected economic institutions in one or more international locations to be visited. This will focus primarily on economic aspects within countries, and could include exploration of the financial, political, global, historical, social, ethical, and cultural environment. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the international destination(s) to explore the culture and visit relevant locations. 3. A final written project and discussion of the experience. The course involves research, written and oral reporting and presentations. Group interaction based upon trust, respect, and integrity are required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • ECO 395 Domestic Field Experience in Economics

    acceptance into the related field experience program, and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Offered in conjunction with a domestic field experience through the Office of Education Abroad, the course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected U.S. economic institutions in one or more U.S. cities to be visited and the exploration of the financial, political, global, historical, social, ethical, and cultural environment. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the U.S. destination(s) to explore the culture and visit relevant locations. 3. A final written project and group discussion of the experience. The course involves extensive research, written and oral reporting, and group interaction based upon trust, respect and integrity.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • ECO 396 Directed Readings in Economics

    QBA 237 or equivalent; and ECO 365 or ECO 385; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Readings and written reports in the area of particular interest to the student with the consent and guidance of the instructor.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • ECO 397 Studies in Economics

    undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Specific subject matter will change from semester to semester, depending on the interests of professors and students. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours, as course topics change. 

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • ECO 409 Applied Econometrics

    QBA 237 or equivalent; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Students will learn simple regression and multiple regression analysis. Additional topics include model building, cross sectional and time series analysis, as well as related topics. Students will be required to engage in original research using the principles taught in the class and to write their research into a research paper. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course. May be taught concurrently with ECO 609. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 409 and ECO 609.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • ECO 425 Industrial Organization

    ECO 165; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Theory and public policy concerning the structure, conduct and performance of U.S. industries. Primary emphasis is on oligopolies and monopolies.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • ECO 435 The Economic Analysis of Law

    ECO 165; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Microeconomic theory is used to analyze the law and legal procedures. Although one purpose of the law is to resolve disputes between individuals, this course will focus on analyzing the incentives that the law gives rational individuals. Economic models are applied to four basic areas of law: property, contract, tort (accident), and criminal law. In addition, economic models are applied to the formation of the law and to legal institutions. May be taught concurrently with ECO 635. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 435 and ECO 635.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    3Spring (odd-numbered years)
  • ECO 450 Urban and Regional Economics

    ECO 101 or ECO 165  or GRY 321 ; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Study of economic forces determining the location of businesses and consumers, and the size, shape, and changes in market areas/cities/land use. Also, application of techniques of economic impact analysis to location decisions. May be taught concurrently with ECO 650. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 450 and ECO 650.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring (even-numbered years)
  • ECO 456 Comparative Economic Systems

    ECO 155; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    This course examines the differing institutions of national economies. Students examine economic systems in various countries, past and present. The focus is on strategies countries use to compete globally, promote economic growth and development, provide for the public good, and protect various national interests in an increasingly global environment. Students also examine the ongoing evolution economic systems around the world, especially with regard to balancing the roles played by markets and governments in the economy. May be taught concurrently with ECO 656. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 456 and ECO 656.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • ECO 473 Mathematical Methods for Economics I

    ECO 155 and ECO 165; and C- grade or better in MTH 130  or higher; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Development and application of mathematical techniques to economics. May be taught concurrently with ECO 673. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 473 and ECO 673.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall (odd-numbered years)
  • ECO 475 Managerial Economics

    ECO 165; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Application of economic analysis to decision making in business management.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • ECO 492 Program Assessment

    102 hours.

    Required assessment of undergraduate economics program. All students majoring in economics are required to enroll in this course during their senior year and complete the Test of Understanding of College Economics (TUCE), an assessment survey, and an exit interview. The focus is on program assessment and development rather than on individual student evaluation. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    0Fall, Spring, Summer
  • ECO 494 Internship in Economics

    permission of department head; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Opportunity to obtain practical understanding and professional growth through appropriate economics-related work experience at a cooperating financial institution, regulatory agency, etc., or in the economics area of a complex business entity. Employment details and academic expectations must be instructor and company-approved prior to enrollment. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of three hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Fall, Spring, Summer
  • ECO 504 Health Care Economics

    ECO 165; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    A basic study of the economics of the health care market. Microeconomic theory is applied to the analysis of health care issues. Attention will be given to empirical studies of health care economics. Identical with HCM 504. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 504 and HCM 504. May be taught concurrently with ECO 604. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 504 and ECO 604.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall (even-numbered years)
  • ECO 514 Game Theory

    ECO 101  or ECO 165 ; and C- grade or better in MTH 130  or higher; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program. 

    This course serves as an introduction to game theory, the study of strategy. The field has applications in economics, business, military strategy, political science, sports, biology, and poker. Possible topics include games vs. decisions, dominance, Nash equilibrium, and others.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • ECO 515 Public Sector Economics

    ECO 155 or ECO 165 ; and C- grade or better in MTH 130  or higher; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program. 

    Allocation and distribution functions of the public sector of the economy; theories of taxation and public expenditure; shifting and incidences of taxes, local-state federal finance. May be taught concurrently with ECO 615. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 515 and ECO 615.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • ECO 520 History of Economic Thought

    ECO 155 and ECO 165; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Development of economic theory. May be taught concurrently with ECO 620. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 520 and ECO 620.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • ECO 540 Environmental, Resource, and Energy Economics

    ECO 165; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    This course will examine the analysis and application of economic principles to environmental, renewable, and nonrenewable natural resources. Topics include methods for valuing the environment, the role of incentives, cost-benefit analysis, the management of renewable resources such as forest, fisheries, water, and arable land as well as the management of nonrenewable resources such as oil, coal, and natural gas. The course will also examine waste and toxic substance disposal and the effect of industry and agriculture on the environment. May be taught concurrently with ECO 640. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 540 and ECO 640.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall (even-numbered years)
  • ECO 560 Applied Data Analytics

    QBA 237  or equivalent; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Students will learn and apply a variety of supervised, unsupervised, and meta machine learning algorithms to learn how to transform information into actionable intelligence. To that end, students will acquire coding skills and gain experience with statistical programming applications.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • ECO 565 International Economics

    ECO 155 and ECO 165 and QBA 237 ; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Introduction to the key concepts of international trade and finance with a focus on the fundamental theories of international economics. Topics include the gains from and the patterns of international trade, protectionism, exchange rate determination and government policy intervention. May be taught concurrently with ECO 665. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 565 and ECO 665.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • ECO 599 Directed Research in Economics

    permission of instructor; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    The student is expected to conduct research in a selected topic in economics and to produce a written report. May be taught concurrently with ECO 699. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 599 and ECO 699.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • ECO 600 Fundamentals of Economics

    College of Business majors must receive permission from a director of a College of Business graduate program.

    An accelerated course dealing with the fundamentals of micro- and macroeconomic theory, designed for graduate students who have not completed undergraduate principles of economics. This course will not be counted in the hours required for a College of Business graduate degree.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Summer
  • ECO 604 Health Care Economics

    A basic study of the economics of the health care market. Microeconomic theory is applied to the analysis of health care issues. Attention will be given to empirical studies of health care economics. Identical with HCM 604. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 604 and HCM 604. May be taught concurrently with ECO 504. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 504 and ECO 604.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • ECO 609 Applied Econometrics

    QBA 600 or equivalent.

    Students will learn simple regression and multiple regression analysis. Additional topics include model building, cross sectional and time series analysis, as well as related topics. Students will be required to engage in original research using the principles taught in the class and to write their research into a research paper. May be taught concurrently with ECO 409. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 409 and ECO 609.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • ECO 614 Game Theory

    ECO 600 and QBA 600 or equivalents.

    This course serves as an introduction to game theory, the study of strategy. The field has applications in economics, business, military strategy, political science, sports, biology, and poker. Possible topics include games vs. decisions, dominance, Nash equilibrium, and others. May be taught concurrently with ECO 514. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 514 and ECO 614.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • ECO 615 Public Sector Economics

    ECO 600  or equivalent.

    Allocation and distribution functions of the public sector of the economy; theories of taxation and public expenditure; shifting and incidences of taxes, local-state federal finance. May be taught concurrently with ECO 515. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 515 and ECO 615.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • ECO 620 History of Economic Thought

    ECO 600  or equivalent.

    Development of economic theory. May be taught concurrently with ECO 520. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 520 and ECO 620.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • ECO 635 The Economic Analysis of Law

    ECO 600  or equivalent.

    Microeconomic theory is used to analyze the law and legal procedures. Although one purpose of the law is to resolve disputes between individuals, this course will focus on analyzing the incentives that the law gives rational individuals. Economic models are applied to four basic areas of law: property, contract, tort (accident), and criminal law. In addition, economic models are applied to the formation of the law and to legal institutions. May be taught concurrently with ECO 435. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 435 and ECO 635.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring (odd-numbered years)
  • ECO 640 Environmental, Resource, and Energy Economics

    ECO 600  or equivalent.

    This course will examine the analysis and application of economic principles to environmental, renewable, and nonrenewable natural resources. Topics include methods for valuing the environment, the role of incentives, cost-benefit analysis, the management of renewable resources such as forest, fisheries, water, and arable land as well as the management of nonrenewable resources such as oil, coal, and natural gas. The course will also examine waste and toxic substance disposal and the effect of industry and agriculture on the environment. May be taught concurrently with ECO 540. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 540 and ECO 640.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall (even-numbered years)
  • ECO 650 Urban and Regional Economics

    ECO 600  or equivalent.

    Study of economic forces determining the location of businesses and consumers, and the size, shape, and changes in market areas/cities/land use. Also, application of techniques of economic impact analysis to location decisions. May be taught concurrently with ECO 450. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 450 and ECO 650.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • ECO 656 Comparative Economics Systems

    ECO 600 or equivalent.

    This course examines the differing institutions of national economies. Students examine economic systems in various countries, past and present. The focus is on strategies countries use to compete globally, promote economic growth and development, provide for the public good, and protect various national interests in an increasingly global environment. Students also examine the ongoing evolution economic systems around the world, especially with regard to balancing the roles played by markets and governments in the economy. May be taught concurrently with ECO 456. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 456 and ECO 656.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • ECO 665 International Economics

    ECO 600  and QBA 600  or equivalents.

    Introduction to the key concepts of international trade and finance with a focus on the fundamental theories of international economics. Topics include the gains from and the patterns of international trade, protectionism, exchange rate determination and government policy intervention. May be taught concurrently with ECO 565. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 565 and ECO 665.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • ECO 673 Mathematical Methods for Economics I

    ECO 600 and QBA 600 or equivalents.

    Development and application of mathematical techniques to economics. May be taught concurrently with ECO 473. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 473 and ECO 673.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall (odd-numbered years)
  • ECO 699 Directed Research in Economics

    permission of instructor.

    The student is expected to conduct research in a selected topic in economics and to produce a written report. May be taught concurrently with ECO 599. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 599 and ECO 699.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • ECO 721 International Political Economy

    A general introduction to the politics of international economic relations, with a special emphasis on the extent, causes, and consequences of globalization. Covers such topics as trade, investment, aid, global warming, international institutions, and the political roots of economic development. Identical with PLS 721. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 721 and PLS 721.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring

Finance (FIN) courses

  • FIN 150 Personal Finance

    A study of personal finance topics from the consumer and societal perspectives. Topics include the preparation and interpretation of personal financial statements and budgets, the time value of money, personal saving, financial market and investment fundamentals, the effective use of consumer credit, personal bankruptcy, insurance principles, automotive and housing decisions, principles of personal taxation, and retirement planning. This course will provide students with the concepts and critical thinking skills to understand the effects of financial decisions on individuals, families, and society.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 266 Principles of Real Estate

    15 hours.

    An introduction to the study of real estate. Topics covered include legal aspects of real property, real estate financing, appraisal, brokerage, land-use control, property management, and investing in real estate.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 310 Fundraising Principles and Practices for Nonprofit Agencies

    undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Comprehensive study of various funding sources for not-for-profit organizations. Explores relationships with umbrella organizations, techniques of fundraising, government funding, grantsmanship, budget control and accountability.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • FIN 350 Entrepreneurial Finance

    ACC 211 and QBA 237; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    This course introduces students to the nuances of financing the small business. Topics include basic forecasting, leverage, break-even analysis, managing working capital, and preparation of financial statements for a business plan.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • FIN 367 Principles of Real Estate Appraisal

    FIN 266; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    An introduction to the study of real estate appraisal. Topics covered include data collection and analysis, neighborhood and regional analysis, land and building function and description, highest and best use analysis, land valuation and improved property valuation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • FIN 368 Real Estate Law

    FIN 266; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Rights and interests in land; evidence of title; co-ownership; contracts for sale of land; deeds; wills and descent; mortgages; liens; landlord and tenant; restrictions; zoning; brokers. Identical with LAW 368. May no receive credit for both FIN 368 and LAW 368.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • FIN 369 Real Estate Development

    FIN 266; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    This course introduces the development process through its four major phases: concept, land acquisition, construction, and sales. Topics covered include project selection, debt and equity funding (obtainable from individual, institutional, and governmental sources), regulatory approval, environmental impact, and marketing.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • FIN 380 Financial Management

    54 hours including ACC 201 and ACC 211 and ECO 155 and ECO 165; and QBA 237 or equivalent; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    An introduction to topics in corporate financial management, including financial markets, time value of money, asset valuation, risk and return, financial analysis and forecasting, capital budgeting, sources, and costs of capital.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • FIN 381 Financial Planning

    54 hours; and C grade or better in MTH 134 or higher; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Introductory analysis and planning for financial goals and problems of individuals and families utilizing the financial planning process. Topics include financial planner ethics, client communication, household financial statements/budgets, cash/credit management, income taxes, housing, risk management, saving/investment, education finance, and estate planning.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 384 Financial Markets and Intermediaries

    ACC 201 and ACC 211 and ECO 155 and ECO 165 and QBA 237 ; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    An overview of the organization and operation of major financial markets and intermediaries. Introduction to basic types of investments and tools used in the investment planning and decision-making process. Concurrent enrollment in FIN 380 is encouraged.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • FIN 390 Intermediate Financial Management

    B- grade or better in FIN 380; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    An in-depth study of corporate financial management concepts, including risk and return, valuation, financial analysis and forecasting, capital budgeting, cost of capital, capital structure, working capital, leasing, and global finance. The course utilizes electronic spreadsheets as a tool to enhance the quality of financial decisions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • FIN 392 International Education Abroad in Finance

    B- or better in FIN 380; acceptance into the related Education Abroad program; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Offered in conjunction with an international Education Abroad program, this course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected companies and institutions in one or more international locations to be visited. This will focus primarily on financial aspects of companies and institutions, but will also address the economic, political, global, historical, social, ethical, and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the international destination(s) to explore the culture and visit companies, institutions, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and discussion of the experience. The course involves research, written and oral reporting and presentations. Group interaction based upon trust, respect, and integrity are required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • FIN 395 Domestic Field Experience in Finance

    B- or better in FIN 380; acceptance into the related field experience program; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Offered in conjunction with a domestic field experience through the Office of Education Abroad, the course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion of selected companies and institutions of one or more major U.S. financial center(s) (e.g. New York) and the economic, political, international, historical, social, ethical, and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit of approximately seven days' duration to the financial center(s) to visit selected companies, financial markets, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and group discussion of the experience. The course involves extensive research, written and oral reporting, and group interaction based upon trust, respect and integrity.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • FIN 480 Financial Decision Making

    FIN 390; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Application of the concepts and techniques of finance to solve financial management problems faced by contemporary companies. The course emphasizes the development of financial decision-making skills through in-depth case analysis or business simulation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 494 Internship in Finance

    B- or Better in FIN 380; permission of department head; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    A variable content course. Opportunity to obtain practical understanding and professional growth through appropriate finance-related work experience at a cooperating financial institution, regulatory agency, etc., or in the finance area of a complex business entity. Employment details and academic expectations must be instructor and company-approved prior to enrollment. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. May be repeated to a maximum of three hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Fall, Spring, Summer
  • FIN 496 Readings in Finance

    permission of department head; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Planned readings designed to intensify and supplement the area of finance.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-2Upon demand
  • FIN 538 Introduction to Estate Planning

    LAW 231 or LAW 600; and FIN 380 or FIN 381 or concurrent enrollment; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Estate planning process; estate distribution probate, wills, trusts, gifts, life insurance; taxes incidental to an estate; administration of estates and trusts; analysis and selection of devices for lifetime and testamentary transfers of property. Identical with RMI 538. May be taught concurrently with FIN 638. Cannot receive credit for more than one of FIN 538, FIN 638, RMI 538, or RMI 638.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 570 Foundations of Fintech

    B- grade or better in FIN 380; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    This course provides an overview of the emerging field of Fintech. As a relatively new field, the world of Fintech is constantly (and rapidly) evolving. The course will cover the history of Fintech, and focus primarily on how Fintech has disrupted two areas of traditional finance: 1) financial intermediation, and 2) investment management. May be taught concurrently with FIN 670. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 570 and FIN 670.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • FIN 581 Professional Financial Planning

    ACC 321 and FIN 381 and FIN 485    and RMI 211 and LAW 231; and RMI 314 or concurrent enrollment; and FIN 538 or RMI 538 or ACC 524 or concurrent enrollment; and undergraduate students must be admitted to degree program.

    A case-oriented study of comprehensive financial planning for client families. This course integrates prior knowledge of financial planning principles and practice, investments, insurance, law, tax planning, retirement planning, and estate planning. Advanced topics in these subjects are also presented. The financial planning process, standards of professional practice, and planner ethics are emphasized. May be taught concurrently with FIN 681. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 581 and FIN 681.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • FIN 582 International Financial Management

    B- grade or better in FIN 380; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    This course is designed to survey how the key concepts of business finance can be applied in the context of a multinational firm. Topics include: the nature and functioning of the foreign exchange market, parity conditions, foreign exchange risk management, and international investment and financing decisions. May be taught concurrently with FIN 682. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 582 and FIN 682.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • FIN 585 Portfolio Management and Alternative Assets

    B- grade or better in FIN 380 ; and FIN 384 ; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    An overview of the portfolio management process for traditional assets such as equity and fixed income securities. Exploration of alternative assets categories, and how such assets can improve the portfolio management outcomes for investors. May be taught concurrently with FIN 685. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 585 and FIN 685.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 586 International Financial Statement Analysis

    B- grade or better in FIN 380; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    An introduction to the study of international financial statement analysis emphasizing the financial statement analysis portion of the common body of knowledge from the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) program. May be taught concurrently with FIN 686. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 586 and FIN 686.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 587 Security Valuation

    B- grade or better in FIN 380 ; and FIN 384 ; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Valuation of equity, fixed income, and derivative securities. May be taught concurrently with FIN 687. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 587 and FIN 687.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 589 Management of Financial Institutions

    B- grade or better in FIN 380; and ECO 305    or FIN 384; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    A study of the theory and practice of managing depository and non-depository financial institutions. The principal focus is asset and liability management, especially with respect to the risks associated with establishing the ideal balance between the two. Such risks include interest rate, liquidity, credit, foreign exchange and capital risk. The use of money and credit markets, as well as derivative securities to minimize risk as well as to achieve strategic financial objectives is stressed. Management implications of current developments in the interaction between financial institutions and markets are discussed. May be taught concurrently with FIN 689. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 589 and FIN 689.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 596 Research Issues and Problems: Finance

    60 hours; and permission of department head; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Research issues and problems growing from special areas of a student's interest which may require additional depth or breadth of study. Student's proposal and outline of study must be approved prior to enrolling. May be taught concurrently with FIN 697. Cannot receive credit for more than six hours of FIN 596 and FIN 697 combined.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • FIN 598 Financial Research and Portfolio Management

    permission of instructor; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    An introduction to finance industry research tools and the use of those tools to conduct in-depth security analysis and portfolio management. The course emphasizes more advanced security analysis and portfolio management techniques, aided by the use of industry accepted research tools. May be taught concurrently with FIN 698. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 598 and FIN 698.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • FIN 599 Directed Study for CFA Level I Exam

    permission of instructor; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    The professor and student will devise a study plan, based upon the CFA Institute's Common Body of Knowledge, that will best-prepare the student to pass the CFA Level I Exam in June of the current year. May be taught concurrently with FIN 699. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 599 and FIN 699.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    3Spring
  • FIN 600 Managerial Finance

    ACC 600 and ECO 600; and permission of a director of a College of Business Graduate Program.

    Comprehensive study of the finance function in the business enterprise, including financial analysis-planning-forecasting, capital budgeting, leasing, working capital management, capital structure, dividend policy, and multinational finance. Designed for graduate students who have not had an undergraduate course in financial management in the last five years. This course will not be counted in the hours required for a College of Business undergraduate or graduate degree.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • FIN 638 Introduction to Estate Planning

    LAW 231 or LAW 600; and FIN 380 or FIN 381 or FIN 600 or concurrent enrollment.

    Estate planning process; estate distribution, probate, wills, trusts, gifts, life insurance; taxes incidental to an estate; administration of estates and trusts; analysis and selection of devices for lifetime and testamentary transfers of property. Identical with RMI 638. May be taught concurrently with FIN 538. Cannot receive credit for more than one of FIN 538, FIN 638, RMI 538, or RMI 638.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 670 Foundations of Fintech

    B- grade or better in FIN 380 or FIN 600; and admission to the MBA program, or admission to a graduate certificate program within the Finance and Risk Management Department, or permission from the MBA Program Director or a director of a graduate program within the College of Business.

    This course provides an overview of the emerging field of Fintech. As a relatively new field, the world of Fintech is constantly (and rapidly) evolving. The course will cover the history of Fintech, and focus primarily on how Fintech has disrupted two areas of traditional finance: 1) financial intermediation, and 2) investment management. May be taught concurrently with FIN 570. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 570 and FIN 670.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • FIN 681 Professional Financial Planning

    ACC 321 and FIN 381 and FIN 485 and RMI 211 and LAW 231; and RMI 314 or concurrent enrollment; and FIN 538 or RMI 538 or RMI 638 or ACC 524 or ACC 624 or concurrent enrollment.

    A case-oriented study of comprehensive financial planning for client families. This course integrates prior knowledge of financial planning principles and practice, investments, insurance, law, tax planning, retirement planning, and estate planning. Advanced topics in these subjects are also presented. The financial planning process, standards of professional practice, and planner ethics are emphasized. May be taught concurrently with FIN 581. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 581 and FIN 681.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • FIN 682 International Financial Management

    B- grade or better in FIN 380 or FIN 600; and admission to the MBA program, or admission to a graduate certificate program within the Finance and Risk Management Department, or permission from the MBA Program Director, or a director of a graduate program within the College of Business.

    This course is designed to survey how the key concepts of business finance can be applied in the context of a multinational firm. Topics include: the nature and functioning of the foreign exchange market, parity conditions, foreign exchange risk management, and international investment and financing decisions. May be taught concurrently with FIN 582. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 582 and FIN 682.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • FIN 685 Portfolio Management and Alternative Assets

    B- grade or better in FIN 380 or FIN 600 ; and admission to the MBA program, or admission to a graduate certificate program within the Finance, Economics and Risk Management Department, or permission from the MBA Program Director, or a director of a graduate program within the College of Business. 

    An overview of the portfolio management process for traditional assets such as equity and fixed income securities. Exploration of alternative assets categories, and how such assets can improve the portfolio management outcomes for investors. May be taught concurrently with FIN 585. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 585 and FIN 685.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 686 International Financial Statement Analysis

    B- grade or better in FIN 380 or FIN 600; and admission to the MBA program, or admission to a graduate certificate program within the Finance and Risk Management Department, or permission from the MBA Program Director, or a director of a graduate program within the College of Business.

    An introduction to the study of international financial statement analysis emphasizing the financial statement analysis portion of the common body of knowledge from the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) program. May be taught concurrently with FIN 586. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 586 and FIN 686.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 687 Security Valuation

    B- grade or better in FIN 380 or FIN 600 ; admission to the MBA program, or admission to a graduate certificate program within the Finance, Economics and Risk Management Department, or permission from the MBA Program Director, or a director of a graduate program within the College of Business. 

    Valuation of equity, fixed income, and derivative securities. May be taught concurrently with FIN 587. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 587 and FIN 687.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 689 Management of Financial Institutions

    B- grade or better in FIN 380 or FIN 600; and admission to the MBA program, or admission to a graduate certificate program within the Finance and Risk Management Department, or permission from the MBA Program Director or a director of a graduate program within the College of Business.

    A study of the theory and practice of managing depository and non-depository financial institutions. The principal focus is asset and liability management, especially with respect to the risks associated with establishing the ideal balance between the two. Such risks include interest rate, liquidity, credit, foreign exchange and capital risk. The use of money and credit markets, as well as derivative securities to minimize risk as well as to achieve strategic financial objectives is stressed. Management implications of current developments in the interaction between financial institutions and markets are discussed. May be taught concurrently with FIN 589. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 589 and FIN 689.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • FIN 697 Research Issues and Problems: Finance

    permission of department head.

    Research issues and problems growing from special areas of a student's interest which may require additional depth or breadth of study. Student's proposal and outline of study must be approved prior to enrolling. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours. May be taught concurrently with FIN 596. Cannot receive credit for more than six hours of FIN 596 and FIN 697 combined.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • FIN 698 Financial Research and Portfolio Management

    permission of instructor.

    An introduction to finance industry research tools and the use of those tools to conduct in-depth security analysis and portfolio management. The course emphasizes more advanced security analysis and portfolio management techniques, aided by the use of industry accepted research tools. May be taught concurrently with FIN 598. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 598 and FIN 698.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • FIN 699 Directed Study for CFA Level I Exam

    permission of instructor.

    The professor and student will devise a study plan, based upon the CFA Institute's Common Body of Knowledge, that will best-prepare the student to pass the CFA Level I Exam in June of the current year. May be taught concurrently with FIN 599. Cannot receive credit for both FIN 599 and FIN 699.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    3Spring
  • FIN 780 Advanced Financial Management

    ACC 711; and B- grade or better in FIN 600; and admission to the MBA program, or admission to a graduate certificate program within the Finance and Risk Management Department, or permission from the MBA Program Director or a director of a graduate program within the College of Business.

    An advanced study of the theory and practice of corporate financial management, including financial analysis and forecasting, working capital, capital budgeting, cost of capital, capital structure, mergers and acquisitions, and valuation. The course utilizes cases to emphasize both theory and technology in supporting sound financial decision-making.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • FIN 787 Seminar in Derivatives

    FIN 780.

    A study of the fundamentals, pricing, and trading strategies of options, forwards, futures and swaps. Emphasis is placed on the modeling tools most widely used for calculating their prices and related hedging parameters. The course includes an exploration of current/relevant literature concerning market mechanics, participants, and government regulation. Each student will participate in the preparation of a significant team project and presentation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • FIN 788 Healthcare Financial Management

    ACC 688.

    An introduction to fundamental financial management concepts and skills necessary for managers at a variety of levels in healthcare organizations. The course provides an overview of financial management and how the finance function is organized in healthcare organizations. Topics covered include: time value of money, risk and return, asset valuation, capital budgeting, financial analysis, costs of capital, and working capital management.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • FIN 790 Seminar in Finance

    15 graduate hours in business administration and economics including FIN 780 and permission of the coordinator of graduate studies.

    Critical evaluation and interpretation of research and literature in finance.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Summer
  • FIN 792 International Education Abroad in Finance

    B- or better in FIN 380 or FIN 600; acceptance into the related Education Abroad program; and admission to a graduate program.

    Offered in conjunction with an international Education Abroad program, this course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected companies and institutions in one or more international locations to be visited. This will focus primarily on financial aspects of companies and institutions, but will also address the economic, political, global, historical, social, ethical, and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the international destination(s) to explore the culture and visit companies, institutions, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and discussion of the experience. The course involves research, written and oral reporting and presentations with graduate-level proficiency. Group interaction based upon trust, respect, and integrity are required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • FIN 794 Internship: Finance

    permission of the director of the appropriate graduate program and department head.

    In consultation with the coordinating professor, the student is engaged in on-the-job experience with a business, organization, or other professional entity. A portfolio of assigned work shall be collected, examined and evaluated during the semester.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • FIN 795 Domestic Field Experience in Finance

    B- or better in FIN 380 or FIN 600; and admission to a graduate program.

    Offered in conjunction with an domestic field experience through the Office of Education Abroad, the course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion of selected companies and institutions of one or more major U.S. financial center(s) (e.g. New York) and the economic, political, international, historical, social, ethical, and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit of approximately seven days' duration to the financial center(s) to visit selected companies, financial markets, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and group discussion of the experience. The course involves extensive research, written and oral reporting, and group interaction based upon trust, respect and integrity.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • FIN 796 Independent Study: Finance

    permission of the director of the appropriate graduate program and department head.

    In consultation with the advisor, student selects for intensive study a specific area of concern related to the student's program with emphasis on research.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • FIN 799 Directed Study for CFA Level II Exam

    permission of instructor and successful completion of the CFA Level I exam.

    The professor and student will devise a study plan, based upon the CFA Institute's Common Body of Knowledge, that will best-prepare the student to pass the CFA Level II Exam in June of the current year.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand

Law (LAW) courses

  • LAW 231 Legal Environment of Business

    24 hours.

    Ethical and legal issues in the domestic and international regulatory environment of business. Foundations of legal reasoning, case analysis, legal dispute resolution and reporting, court systems and sources of law. Substantive areas of torts, contracts, sales, products liability and consumer rights and remedies. Contemporary legal issues explored in such areas as: regulation of environmental practices, deceptive advertising, debt collection, employment, anti-trust and computer law.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • LAW 332 Debtor and Creditor Rights and Remedies

    LAW 231; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Legal aspects of financial transactions. The rules of law governing financial transactions in today's business and personal affairs. Topical areas include commercial paper, secured transactions, and bankruptcy.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Fall, Spring, Summer
  • LAW 335 Business Enterprises, Rights/Liabilities

    LAW 231 and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Legal alternatives in the structuring of the business enterprise and its relationship with employees. Topical areas include personal property, bailments, real property, leaseholds, intellectual property rights, franchises, sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, LLC's, agency and employment law. Cannot receive credit for both LAW 335 and LAW 532.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    22Upon demand
  • LAW 341 Legal Research and Writing

    LAW 231; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Use of primary and secondary legal sources and indexes are examined, including state and federal statutes, government regulations, cases, Shepard's, Missouri Practice series, law reviews and legal encyclopedias; types of legal writing are introduced; research techniques are applied to case analysis and legal writing.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • LAW 368 Real Estate Law

    FIN 266; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Identical with FIN 368. Cannot receive credit for both LAW 368 and FIN 368.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • LAW 531 Labor Law and Employment Discrimination

    LAW 231; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Legal, regulatory, and ethical issues related to employer-employee relationship, including employment-at-will doctrine, discrimination and union contracts. May be taught concurrently with LAW 631. Cannot receive credit for both LAW 531 and LAW 631.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • LAW 532 Legal Environment of Business Organizations for Professionals

    LAW 231; and 54 hours; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Agency and employment responsibilities and liabilities facing new and traditional forms of business organizations are compared, along with selected tax and security regulation issues. Personal and real property concepts are examined, along with environmental exposure issues. Selected contract and UCC concepts are reviewed. Issue recognition, problem analysis approach and testing mechanisms are especially appropriate for individuals taking the CPA or other professional exams. Cannot receive credit for both LAW 532 and LAW 335. May be taught concurrently with LAW 632. Cannot receive credit for both LAW 532 and LAW 632.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • LAW 537 Environmental Regulation

    36 hours; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Environmental laws and government regulations of air, water and land utilization, energy resources, solid and toxic waste disposal, torts, labeling of toxic substances, recycling; ethical, public policy and international implications such regulations and court interpretations pose for business practices, natural resource utilization, health quality, biodiversity, and endangered species. May be taught concurrently with LAW 637. Cannot receive credit for both LAW 537 and LAW 637.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • LAW 539 Legal Regulation of International Commerce

    LAW 231; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Legal and ethical issues associated with doing business in a global economy. Difference in approach to contracting and merchandising; product standards, protection and liability; trade barriers and regulation of business practices. May be taught concurrently with LAW 639. Cannot receive credit for both LAW 539 and LAW 639.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • LAW 550 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business

    60 hours; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    A practical, skills-based study of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration from the business manager's perspective. This hands-on course is designed to develop the skills necessary to enable the business manager to effectively participate in negotiation, mediation, and arbitration as alternatives to litigation for resolving business disputes. Identical with BUS 550. May be taught concurrently with LAW 650. Cannot receive credit for more than one of BUS 550, BUS 650, LAW 550, or LAW 650.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • LAW 600 Legal Environment for Business Managers

    permission of a director of a College of Business Graduate Program.

    Contemporary legal and ethical issues encountered by business managers will be discussed, including issues related to torts, vicarious liability, products liability issues; formation and enforcement of contracts and sale of goods; regulatory environment affecting employment practices/discrimination, product advertising and environmental responsibility; economic development issues associated with environmental sustainability, property rights, constitutional law and city planning. Agency liabilities and fiduciary responsibilities of agents and managers in business organizations will be examined. An overview of the court system and legal dispute resolution mechanisms will be integrated. This course is primarily intended for MBA students who do not have equivalent undergraduate business law coursework, and this course will not be counted in the hours required for a College of Business graduate degree.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • LAW 631 Labor Law and Employment Discrimination

    LAW 231 or LAW 600.

    Legal, regulatory, and ethical issues related to employer-employee relationship, including employment-at-will doctrine, discrimination and union contracts. May be taught concurrently with LAW 531. Cannot receive credit for both LAW 531 and LAW 631.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • LAW 632 Legal Environment of Business Organizations for Professionals

    LAW 231 or LAW 600.

    Agency and employment responsibilities and liabilities facing new and traditional forms of business organizations are compared, along with selected tax and security regulation issues. Personal and real property concepts are examined, along with environmental exposure issues. Selected contract and UCC concepts are reviewed. Issue recognition, problem analysis approach and testing mechanisms are especially appropriate for individuals taking the CPA or other professional exams. May be taught concurrently with LAW 532. Cannot receive credit for both LAW 532 and LAW 632.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • LAW 637 Environmental Regulation

    Environmental laws and government regulations of air, water and land utilization, energy resources, solid and toxic waste disposal, torts, labeling of toxic substances, recycling; ethical, public policy and international implications such regulations and court interpretations pose for business practices, natural resource utilization, health quality, biodiversity, and endangered species. May be taught concurrently with LAW 537. Cannot receive credit for both LAW 537 and LAW 637. 

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • LAW 639 Legal Regulation of International Commerce

    LAW 231 or LAW 600.

    Legal and ethical issues associated with doing business in a global economy. Difference in approach to contracting and merchandising; product standards, protection and liability; trade barriers and regulation of business practices. May be taught concurrently with LAW 539. Cannot receive credit for both LAW 539 and LAW 639.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • LAW 650 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business

    A practical, skills-based study of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration from the business manager's perspective. This hands-on course is designed to develop the skills necessary to enable the business manager to effectively participate in negotiation, mediation, and arbitration as alternatives to litigation for resolving business disputes. Identical with BUS 650. May be taught concurrently with LAW 550. Cannot receive credit for more than one of BUS 550, BUS 650, LAW 550, or LAW 650.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • LAW 730 Seminar: Contemporary Legal Issues

    LAW 231 or LAW 600.

    In-depth study of selected contemporary legal issues and their impact on the environment of business. Exploration of legal resources relevant to the topics.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • LAW 733 Legal Regulation of Competition and Monopoly

    LAW 231 and LAW 335; or LAW 600.

    Evolution of legal theory regarding governmental regulation of business. The judicial application of laws relating to anti-trust, price discrimination, entry regulation, rate making.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand

Risk Management and Insurance (RMI) courses

  • RMI 211 Principles of Risk Management and Insurance

    15 hours.

    An introduction to the nature of risk and strategies for managing personal and enterprise risks. Analysis of insurance coverage including life, health, retirement, property, and liability and the use of insurance in the risk management process.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring, Summer
  • RMI 310 Theory of Risk and Measurement

    QBA 237 or equivalent; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Decision making under uncertainty: Theory of personal and corporate risk management, risk premiums, and measures of risk.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • RMI 312 Life Insurance

    RMI 211; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Nature and types of life insurance and annuity contracts insuring human life values for business and personal purposes; principles underlying the calculation of life insurance and annuity premiums, reserves, nonforfeiture values and dividends; introduction of group life insurance, pensions, health, social insurance, settlement options, taxation as related to life insurance programming.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • RMI 313 Property and Liability Insurance

    RMI 211; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Analysis and application of risk and insurance principles to direct and consequential losses in fire, marine, inland marine, multiple-line coverages, liability, workers' compensation, fidelity, surety, and crime perils.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • RMI 314 Employee Benefits and Social Insurance

    30 hours; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    The study of group life and health insurance, retirement programs, Social Security, and other social insurance programs as devices to mitigate economic losses from death, disability, medical costs, retirement, and unemployment in relation to personal and business risk problems.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • RMI 392 International Education Abroad in Risk Management and Insurance

    RMI 211; acceptance into the related Education Abroad program; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Offered in conjunction with an international Education Abroad program, this course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected companies and institutions in one or more major international locations to be visited. This will focus primarily on risk management and insurance aspects, but will also address the economic, political, global, historical, social, ethical, and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the international destination(s) to explore the culture and visit companies, institutions, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and discussion of the experience. The course involves research, written and oral reporting and presentations. Group interaction based upon trust, respect, and integrity are required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • RMI 395 Domestic Field Experience in Risk Management and Insurance

    RMI 211; acceptance into the related field experience program; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Offered in conjunction with a domestic field experience through the Office of Education Abroad, this course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected companies and institutions in one or more major U.S. financial center(s) (e.g. New York City) to be visited. This will focus primarily on risk management and insurance aspects, but will also address the economic, political, global, historical, social, ethical, and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the destination(s) to explore the culture and visit companies, institutions, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and discussion of the experience. The course involves research, written and oral reporting and presentations. Group interaction based upon trust, respect, and integrity are required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • RMI 397 Topics in Insurance

    undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program; students taking course as independent study, readings, or professional designation courses must obtain department head approval prior to enrollment.

    A variable content course to intensify and supplement the study of insurance, designed for students desiring to develop toward professional competence in property/casualty, risk management, life/health, employee benefits, financial services, and insurance-related areas. Course design may include independent study, readings, professional designation courses, and/or traditional classroom work. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • RMI 415 Risk Management

    80 hours including RMI 211; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Identifying and analyzing the loss exposures. Developing alternative techniques for treating each exposure with emphasis on risk control and risk financing.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • RMI 494 Internship in Risk Management and Insurance

    B- or Better in RMI 211; 2.

    Opportunity to obtain practical understanding and professional growth through appropriate risk management/insurance-related work experience at a cooperating insurance firm, regulatory agency, etc., or in the risk management area of a complex business entity. Employment details and outline of study must be instructor and company-approved prior to enrollment. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of three hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Fall, Spring, Summer
  • RMI 520 Risk Modeling and Analytics

    FIN 390 or FIN 485    or MTH 261 or RMI 310 or concurrent enrollment in any of these courses; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Actuarial and financial models of risk, statistical distributions, and simulations. Applications to operational, credit and market risks. May be taught concurrently with RMI 620. Cannot receive credit for both RMI 520 and RMI 620.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • RMI 530 Risk Transfer

    FIN 390 or FIN 485    or MTH 261 or RMI 310 or concurrent enrollment in any of these courses; undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Insurance transfers including captives. Non-insurance transfers including derivative markets, asset backed and insurance linked securitizations. May be taught concurrently with RMI 630. Cannot receive credit for both RMI 530 and RMI 630.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • RMI 538 Introduction to Estate Planning

    LAW 231 or LAW 600; and FIN 380 or FIN 381 or concurrent enrollment; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to degree program.

    Estate planning process; estate distribution, probate, wills, trusts, gifts, life insurance; taxes incidental to an estate; administration of estates and trusts; analysis and selection of devices for lifetime and testamentary transfers of property. Identical with FIN 538. May be taught concurrently with RMI 638. Cannot receive credit for more than one of FIN 538, FIN 638, RMI 538, or RMI 638.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • RMI 620 Risk Modeling and Analytics

    FIN 390 or FIN 485 or MTH 261 or RMI 310 or QBA 600 or concurrent enrollment in any of these courses.

    Actuarial and financial models of risk, statistical distributions, and simulations. Applications to operational, credit and market risks. May be taught concurrently with RMI 520. Cannot receive credit for both RMI 520 and RMI 620.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • RMI 630 Risk Transfer

    FIN 390 or FIN 485 or MTH 261 or RMI 310 or QBA 600 or concurrent enrollment in any of these courses.

    Insurance transfers including captives. Non-insurance transfers including derivative markets, asset backed and insurance linked securitizations. May be taught concurrently with RMI 530. Cannot receive credit for both RMI 530 and RMI 630.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • RMI 638 Introduction to Estate Planning

    LAW 231 or LAW 600; and FIN 380 or FIN 381 or FIN 600 or concurrent enrollment.

    Estate planning process; estate distribution, probate, wills, trusts, gifts, life insurance; taxes incidental to an estate; administration of estates and trusts; analysis and selection of devices for lifetime and testamentary transfers of property. Identical with FIN 638. May be taught concurrently with RMI 538. Cannot receive credit for more than one of FIN 538, FIN 638, RMI 538, or RMI 638.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • RMI 785 Advanced Topics in Risk Management and Insurance

    QBA 600 or equivalent.

    Focus on the advanced study of risk management and insurance incorporating both theory and practice.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • RMI 792 International Education Abroad in Risk Management and Insurance

    RMI 211; acceptance into the related Education Abroad program; and admission to a graduate program.

    Offered in conjunction with an international Education Abroad program, this course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected companies and institutions in one or more international locations to be visited. This will focus primarily on risk management and insurance aspects, but will also address the economic, political, global, historical, social, ethical, and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the international destination(s) to explore the culture and visit companies, institutions, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and discussion of the experience. The course involves research, written and oral reporting and presentations with graduate-level proficiency. Group interaction based upon trust, respect, and integrity are required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • RMI 795 Domestic Field Experience in Risk Management and Insurance

    RMI 211; acceptance into the related field experience program; and admission to a graduate program.

    Offered in conjunction with a domestic field experience program through the Office of Education Abroad, this course consists of three parts; 1. Background research and discussion on selected companies and institutions in one or more major U.S. financial center(s) (e.g. New York City) to be visited. This will focus primarily on risk management and insurance aspects, but will also address the economic, political, global, historical, social, ethical, and cultural environment in which they function. 2. A visit, typically of seven days or longer, to the destination(s) to explore the culture and visit companies, institutions, and cultural icons. 3. A final written project and discussion of the experience. The course involves research, written and oral reporting and presentations with graduate-level proficiency. Group interaction based upon trust, respect, and integrity are required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand