Communication, Media, Journalism and Film Courses

Communication (COM) courses

  • COM 100 Introduction to Majors in Communication

    This course is intended for new or prospective Communication majors and minors. The course informs students about programs of study in Communication and assists students in making decisions regarding degree programs and career plans. This is an elective course that will not count towards major or minor requirements. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Upon demand
  • COM 115 Fundamentals of Public Speaking

    Focus on Oral Communication

    Instruction and practice in researching, composing, and delivering formal and informal speeches in a variety of public contexts. Representative topics include: ethics in public speaking; listening; library research; outlining; delivery; writing in an oral style; evaluation of public address; and analyzing and adapting to audiences. The course emphasizes informative and persuasive speaking.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, SpringCOMM 110 - Fundamentals of Public Speaking.
  • COM 120 Fundamentals of Debate

    A survey of fundamental principles of debate, including research techniques, argument invention and construction, refutation, and strategy. This course is taught in relationship to current debate topics, and is not limited to participants on the debate team. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, SpringCOMM 220 - Argumentation and Debate.
  • COM 205 Interpersonal Communication Theory and Skills

    Theory and practice in the principles and skills of interpersonal communication within a variety of contexts. Representative topics include: perception; self-concept development; verbal and nonverbal communication; effective listening techniques; conflict resolution; and sensitivity to cultural and gender differences.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, SpringCOMM 120 - Interpersonal Communication.
  • COM 206 Introduction to Health Communication

    An introductory survey of contemporary health communication issues, including patient-provider communication, health ethics, health organizations, health campaigns, and health and the media.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • COM 209 Survey of Communication Theory

    A survey of selected theoretical approaches to understanding mediated and non-mediated human communication.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 210 Communication Research Methods

    COM 209.

    A survey of the quantitative and qualitative methods most commonly used for research in communication. Topics include the nature of the research process; research ethics; academic vs. applied research; evaluating research; and a discussion of specific research methods such as experimental design, statistical interpretation, survey research, individual and group interviewing, sampling and polling, content analysis, ethnography, and qualitative analysis techniques.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 219 Public Relations Theory and Research

    The course introduces students to the theory and research of public relations. Students will explore prevailing theories and basic methods of research used in contemporaneous public relations practice. This course prepares students for advanced study and work in public relations.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • COM 260 Communicating with Cultural Competence

    Focus on Cultural Competence

    A cultural competence-based approach to contemporary intercultural communication issues in the United States. Topics include consideration of communication practices as they relate to ethnicity, race, religion, gender, sexuality, family structure, social class, age, and ability.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, SpringSBSC 101 - Introduction to Intercultural Communication.
  • COM 300 Professional Development in Communication

    COM 115 and COM 209.

    This course assists Communication students to assess their abilities and qualifications, to research professional opportunities, and to prepare for job searching and career planning.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    11Upon demand
  • COM 305 Service-Learning in Communication

    30 hours and concurrent registration in a communication course designated as a service-learning offering.

    This service component for an existing course incorporates community service with classroom instruction in communication to provide an integrative learning experience that addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs. Includes 40 hours of service that benefits an external community organization, agency, or public service provider. Approved service placements and assignments will vary depending on the course topic and learning objectives; a list of approved placements and assignments is available from the instructor and the Citizenship and Service-Learning Office. May be repeated.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1Upon demand
  • COM 307 Gender and Communication

    This course examines theory and research on gender and communication. Its purpose is to help students explore how gender and communication are interrelated, how these concepts intertwine with other aspects of our identities, and how these factors play out in their own lives.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 309 Principles of Public Relations

    Study of the development, planning, and implementation of communication programs and campaigns. Emphasis on the professional practices and ethical standards important to effective communication within organizations, and between organizations and their publics.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 315 Advanced Speaking in Professional Settings

    COM 115.

    An advanced course focused on developing competence in a variety of professional speaking situations. Content areas include speaking in live and mediated contexts, interacting with an audience, and providing feedback to others.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 320 Principles of Advanced Debate

    A survey of principles of debate, including counterplans, criticism, deep refutation, and other advanced strategies. This course is taught in relationship to current debate topics, and is not limited to participants on the debate team. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • COM 321 Inter-Collegiate Debating

    Open only to those chosen to debate as University representatives. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Fall, Spring
  • COM 322 Introduction to Argumentation

    COM 115.

    Fundamental theories of argument. This course will meet the secondary teaching certification requirements for a minimum of 2 semester hours in debate. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 325 Nonverbal Communication

    This course examines the methods of research in nonverbal communication, the types or subcodes of nonverbal behaviors, and the application of nonverbal behaviors in social situations.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 326 Effective Listening

    COM 115 and COM 209.

    The purpose of this course is to prepare the student to understand listening attitudes and behavior and to build a program for improvement in listening skills through application of listening theory to practical situations.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • COM 328 Persuasion

    COM 115.

    Modern theories of persuasion with some evaluation of specific case studies.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 332 Small Group Communication

    COM 115 and COM 209.

    Basic theory and techniques of oral interaction in group activities.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • COM 336 Communication in Organizations

    COM 115 and COM 209.

    Analysis of communication processes as they occur within organizations. Students study both the effects of the organizational context on communication as well as the role of communication in shaping organizational life and effectiveness.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 338 Communication Strategies for Recruitment in Organizations

    COM 115.

    This course will examine communication as a tool for successful recruitment (e.g., interviewing and networking) in organizations. This specialty course will advance students' ability to be competitive for various careers and to be knowledgeable of the role of communication in career-related strategies. Students will develop skills to be applied as both an applicant and an employer. Topics include: phases of the interview process, event and career networking, employment research strategies, and applicant presentation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 350 The Rhetorical Tradition and Contemporary Applications

    COM 115 and COM 209 and COM 210.

    A survey of rhetorical theories and methods from the classical period until present. The relevance of the rhetorical tradition to contemporary communication theory and practice is stressed. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 360 Intercultural Communication Theory and Research

    COM 209 and COM 210 and COM 260.

    A survey of intercultural communication theory, research, and contemporary applications.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • COM 368 Communicating Culture and Identity

    COM 260.

    This course is a communication-based exploration of U.S. cultural diversity, including the study of ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, cultural ritual, custom, everyday conversation, and social interaction as manifestations of cultural diversity. This course may be taught from a variety of perspectives.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • COM 379 Writing for Public Relations

    Study and preparation of copy for press releases, newsletters, brochures, annual reports, and other written public relations communications.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 380 Leadership in Practice

    COM 115; and permission of instructor.

    Students will learn and demonstrate effective ethical leadership as they manage the Vicki Stanton Public Speaking Showcase. They will learn various leadership theories on decision making, conflict resolution, problem solving and efficiency.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 390 Communication and Aging

    Communication theories as they apply to the aging process. Examination of the effects of communication on the self-esteem, self-perception, well-being, and quality of life of the elderly. Study of communication between the elderly, the elderly and the young, and the elderly and their caregivers in a variety of contexts, including in one-on-one, family, and mediated situations.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • COM 397 Topics in Communication

    A course covering a single topic within the field of Communication; subject will vary according to student demand and faculty availability. Examples include Conflict and Conflict Management, and Gender Differences. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours with permission of department..

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • COM 400 Service Learning in Communication

    permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in a communication, media, or journalism course designated as a service-learning offering.

    This service component for an existing course incorporates community service with classroom instruction in communications to provide an integrative learning experience that addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs. Includes 40 hours of service that benefits an external community organization, agency, or public service provider. Approved service placements and assignments will vary depending on the course topic and learning objectives; a list of approved placements and assignments is available from the instructor and the Citizenship and Service-Learning Office. May be repeated.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1Upon demand
  • COM 405 Advanced Interpersonal Communication

    COM 205.

    A survey of contemporary interpersonal communication theories and issues within a variety of contexts.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall (odd-numbered years)
  • COM 406 Family Communication

    This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth examination of communication as it functions in family systems.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • COM 407 Health Communication and Culture

    The examination of intercultural communication concepts in the health care context. Emphasis will be on understanding the health needs of diverse populations, Western health practices, non-Western health practices, and the conflicts that can emerge when cultures collide.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 408 Patient-Provider Communication

    This course explores the nature of patient-provider interactions in health care contexts. Emphasis is placed on traditional and non-traditional health care providers, their patients, and interpersonal communication theories specific to health care interactions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 410 Conflict and Communication

    Equips students to understand the dynamics of interpersonal conflict and its resolution in a variety of community settings. Students will learn to analyze their own conflict styles and to develop self-regulation strategies for collaborative outcomes. The course covers conflict theory and research and allows opportunities to apply this information to current issues in community and organizational settings and within diverse populations. Lectures/discussions by scholars, community leaders, and/or agency personnel who deal with conflict as well as simulations of conflict situations will be provided.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 412 Communication and Diversity in the Workplace

    Exploration of current theory and research regarding communication and diversity in the workplace. Study of practical applications for the assessment and training of communication skills relative to culture, race, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation and other diversity issues. Emphasis is placed on improving understanding of communication similarities and differences among diverse population groups. Includes readings, class discussion, observation, and/or class projects about assessment and training in communication skills in a diverse workplace.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 413 Ethical Issues in Communication

    Ethical theories and justification models are studied and then related to ethical decision making in a variety of communication contexts, including interpersonal communication, group communication, organizational communication, and public communication. The course will examine the components of good ethical decision making in communication, as well as obstacles that can stand in the way of responsible choices.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 417 Teaching of Speech and Theatre

    EDC 350 and EDT 365 and SPE 340; and 12 hours in communication; and 12 hours in theatre.

    Scope and objectives of the speech and theatre program in secondary schools; organization and administration of curricular and co-curricular programs; general instruction methodology. Completion of Checkpoint II for the Professional Portfolio is a component of this course. This course is recommended to be completed the fall semester before supervised teaching. Credited only on BSEd (Secondary). A C grade or better is required in this course in order to take COM 490 or COM 491. Cannot be taken Pass/Not Pass. Identical with THE 417. Cannot receive credit for both COM 417 and THE 417.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • COM 423 Contemporary Topics in Conflict

    COM 411 or permission.

    An in-depth exploration of a specific topic in conflict. Topics will vary from semester to semester and may include but are not limited to the following: Dialogue and Facilitation, Conflict and Communication Coaching, Advanced Mediation, Family Conflict, Communication and Restorative Processes, Conflict Management in Schools, and Peace and Conflict. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours with permission of the department.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • COM 433 Crisis Communication

    MED 120  and COM 115 

    Designed to prepare students for anticipating, managing, and navigating, crises in individual and corporate settings. Students will explore a wide range of crises, such as financial scandals, legal issues, cyber-crime, ethical violations, data breaches, produce recalls, and leadership controversies.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • COM 436 Communication and Leadership

    COM 115; and 60 hours.

    In-depth study of the relationship between communication and leadership within organizations and the development of specific communication competencies associated with effective leadership.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • COM 437 Advanced Organizational Communication

    COM 115 and COM 209 and COM 336; and 60 hours.

    In-depth examination of a specific organizational communication topic. Topics will vary from semester to semester and may include: Conducting a Communication Audit, Communication Training and Development, Symbolism in Organizations, Interorganizational Collaboration and Communicating Organizational Change.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 439 Techniques and Cases in Public Relations

    Communication theories and techniques of message preparation as applied to the function of organizational promotion.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 450 Political Communication

    Examination of the communication process in modern political campaigns. Emphasis is placed on the role of communication strategies and tactics in political organization, message formation, fund raising, and mass media usage.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • COM 452 Communication Technology and Politics

    This course focuses on how communication technology contributes to the political process including campaigns, discourse, and information gathering. Heavy emphasis is placed on the distribution, reception, and process of political information through all communication technology, including social media, in terms of both theory and practice.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • COM 454 Presidential Rhetoric

    COM 115; and Communication majors must complete COM 209 and COM 210 and COM 350.

    Examination of rhetoric used in governance, with a primary focus on presidential rhetoric. Emphasis is placed on history of presidential address, genre expectations for common presidential topics, political speechwriting, and rhetorical norms for legislative and judicial rhetoric.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 459 Social Media Analytics for Public Relations

    This course focuses on the application of social media monitoring tools and teaches students to become social media analysts to create real-time content and engagement with various publics.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 466 Social Movement Communication

    COM 115 and COM 209.

    Examination of social movement communication with emphasis on functionalist, dramatistic, and symbolic convergence theories. Study of movements' use of communication to generate discontent, mobilize and coordinate support, defend themselves and attack opponents, and negotiate with external groups. Critical analysis of collective actions such as student, civil rights, identity, labor, religious, feminist, lesbian/gay, and utopian movements.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 468 Ethnography in Communication Research

    COM 260 and COM 360.

    This course focuses on the study and application of ethnography in communication as a research method.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 469 Global Public Relations

    This course develops an understanding of the global perspective of public relations with an emphasis on corporate and agency public relations practice.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 479 Strategic Communication for Events

    The foundational application of communication theories in the area of social, professional, recreational, personal, educational, and commercial special events. This course offers a comprehensive study of staging, implementing, budgeting and marketing activities in an event-centered society.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 490 Supervised Teaching (Secondary Speech and Theatre)

    COM 417; and a C grade or better in all professional education courses; and current pre-professional liability insurance; and approval for supervised teaching; and concurrent enrollment in COM 491.

    Student observes then teaches speech and theatre classes under the direction of the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. Student participates in school-related activities appropriate to the assignment and attends all required meetings. In order to receive a grade in this course, the student's professional portfolio must meet or exceed final criteria. Cannot count toward the major GPA. Identical with THE 490. Cannot receive credit for both COM 490 and THE 490.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    6Fall, Spring
  • COM 491 Supervised Teaching (Secondary Speech and Theatre)

    Concurrent enrollment in COM 490.

    Student observes then teaches under the direction of the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. Student participates in school-related activities appropriate to the assignment and attends all required meetings. In order to receive a grade in this course, the student's professional portfolio must meet or exceed final criteria. Cannot count toward the major GPA. Cannot receive credit for both COM 491 and THE 491. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    6Fall, Spring
  • COM 493 Clinical Experiences in Teaching II

    EDC 199; and admitted to Teacher Education; and C grade or better in all professional education courses; and completion of portfolio checkpoints 1 and 2; and current pre-professional liability insurance; and program approval.

    This course is designed to meet HB 1711 for student's experience as a Teacher's Aide or Assistant Rule (Rule 5 CSR 80-805.040), to that of conventional student teachers within the same program. It is also designed to support completion of additional clinical requirements within that program including: seminars and workshops, required meetings, school related activities appropriate to the assignment, demonstrated mastery of the MoSPE standards and completion and overall assessment of a Professional Preparation Portfolio. This course is credited only on BSEd or appropriate master's-level certification programs. Can only receive credit for one of the following: AGE 499, AGT 499, ART 469, COM 493, ECE 499, ELE 499, ENG 434, CTE 498, HST 499, KIN 498, LCR 491, MID 499, MTH 496, MUS 499, SCI 499, SEC 499, SPE 499, THE 493.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    4Fall, Spring
  • COM 494 Conflict Internship

    COM 205; and COM 410 or COM 521; and permission of instructor.

    This course allows students an applied opportunity to integrate theoretical material on conflict and dispute resolution in a variety of contexts in which conflict occurs. Meeting minimum prerequisite requirements does not guarantee internship placement. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the Internship Coordinator. May be taught concurrently with COM 794. Cannot receive credit for both COM 494 and COM 794.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • COM 495 Communication Internship

    60 hours; and COM 115 and COM 209; and nine additional COM hours; and major/minor minimum GPA of 3.00; and declared Communication Studies major or Communication minor or declared undergraduate certificate in Conflict and Dispute Resolution; and permission of Internship Coordinator.

    Supervised pre-professional field experience related to communication studies. Meeting minimum prerequisite requirements does not guarantee internship placement. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of Internship Coordinator. No more than three hours may be applied to a Communication minor. No more than one hour may be applied to the Undergraduate Certificate in Conflict and Dispute Resolution. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-6Fall, Spring
  • COM 496 Independent Study in Communication

    COM 115 and COM 209; and permission of instructor.

    Supervised independent study exploring in-depth selected areas.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Fall, Spring
  • COM 509 Communication Campaigns

    COM 219  and COM 309 .

    This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience researching, planning, executing, and evaluating communication campaigns with actual clients. Variable content course. May be repeated once for credit.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 519 Bateman Competition PRSSA

    COM 115 and COM 209 and COM 210; and permission of instructor.

    This course aims to prepare students for advanced public relations problem-solving. At the end of this course, students will research, develop and execute a strategic public relations plan by competing in the national Public Relations Student Society of America Bateman Case Study Competition.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 521 Communication, Mediation, and Negotiation

    Explores the communicative foundation for understanding the processes of mediation and negotiation as methods for resolving conflict, with an emphasis on interpersonal and organizational conflict. The course covers theories and concepts pertaining to mediation and negotiation, particularly alternative dispute resolution, and provides students the opportunity to apply concepts through a variety of experiential activities. May be taught concurrently with COM 621. Cannot receive credit for both COM 521 and COM 621.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • COM 532 Teaching Debate

    COM 322.

    This course prepares the student to teach various forms of debate in a high school setting. It will explore all major forms of high school debate, including CX Policy Debate, L/D Debate, parliamentary, and Public Forum debate. May be taught concurrently with COM 631. Cannot receive credit for both COM 532 and COM 631.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • COM 534 Teaching Individual Events

    THE 323.

    This course prepares the student to teach various individual events common in a high school setting. It will explore all major high school individual events, including Foreign and Domestic Extemporaneous Speaking, Original Oratory, Poetry, Prose, Dramatic Interpretation, Humorous Interpretation, Radio Speaking, Storytelling, and Student Congress. May be taught concurrently with COM 633. Cannot receive credit for both COM 534 and COM 633.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • COM 536 Directing Forensics

    COM 532 and COM 534.

    Problems in coaching and conducting forensic contests. May be taught concurrently with COM 635. Cannot receive credit for both COM 536 and COM 635.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    212Upon demand
  • COM 597 Studies in Communication Theory and Practice

    In-depth examination of a specific communication topic. May vary from semester to semester. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours with permission of the department. May be taught concurrently with COM 698. Cannot receive credit for both COM 597 and COM 698.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • COM 621 Communication, Mediation, and Negotiation

    Explores the communicative foundation for understanding the processes of mediation and negotiation as methods for resolving conflict, with an emphasis on interpersonal and organizational conflict. The course covers theories and concepts pertaining to mediation and negotiation, particularly alternative dispute resolution, and provides students the opportunity to apply concepts through a variety of experiential activities. May be taught concurrently with COM 521. Cannot receive credit for both COM 521 and COM 621.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • COM 631 Teaching Debate

    This course prepares the student to teach various forms of debate in a high school setting. It will explore all major forms of high school debate, including CX Policy Debate, L/D Debate, parliamentary, and Public Forum debate. May be taught concurrently with COM 532. Cannot receive credit for both COM 532 and COM 631.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • COM 633 Teaching Individual Events

    This course prepares the student to teach various individual events common in a high school setting. It will explore all major high school individual events, including Foreign and Domestic Extemporaneous Speaking, Original Oratory, Poetry, Prose, Dramatic Interpretation, Humorous Interpretation, Radio Speaking, Storytelling, and Student Congress. May be taught concurrently with COM 534. Cannot receive credit for both COM 534 and COM 633.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • COM 635 Directing Forensics

    Problems in coaching and conducting forensic contests. May be taught concurrently with COM 536. Cannot receive credit for both COM 536 and COM 635.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    212Upon demand
  • COM 698 Studies in Communication Theory and Practice

    In-depth examination of a specific communication topic. May vary from semester to semester. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours with permission of the department. May be taught concurrently with COM 597. Cannot receive credit for both COM 597 and COM 698.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 700 Service Learning in Communication Graduate Study

    permission of instructor and concurrent enrollment in a communication, media, or journalism course designated as a service-learning offering.

    This service component for an existing course incorporates community service with classroom instruction in communications to provide an integrative learning experience that addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs. Includes 40 hours of service that benefits an external community organization, agency, or public service provider. Approved service placements and assignments will vary depending on the course topic and learning objectives; a list of approved placements and assignments is available from the instructor and the Citizenship and Service-Learning Office.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1Fall, Spring
  • COM 701 Introduction to Graduate Studies

    Introduction to graduate study in communication. Topics include an overview of the field, introduction to relevant journals, library skills, professional associations, planning a program of study, and how to satisfy the research requirement.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • COM 702 Communication Theory and Research

    Survey of communication theory, models, and research. Topics include perception, construction of meaning, language and symbol systems, interpersonal discourse, relationships, small group interaction, and organizational communication.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • COM 703 Professional Communication Skills

    admission to the MBA program.

    This course seeks to enhance students' awareness and appreciation of communication processes in business and professional settings. An emphasis is placed on improving skills in interpersonal relations, teamwork, and professional presentation. Skills and applications related to communication competence and impression management from the individual's perspective working within the contextual enabling and constraining of organizational hierarchy are underscored.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    11Fall, Spring
  • COM 704 Health Communication and Culture

    The examination of intercultural communication concepts in the health care context. Emphasis will be on understanding the health needs of diverse populations, Western health practices, non-Western health practices, and the conflicts that can emerge when cultures collide.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 705 Health Communication

    Examination of communication theory in the health care context. Emphasis will be on communication effectiveness in health care professional/client relationships, in addition to message practices in small group, organizational, and mediated health campaign settings.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 706 Rhetorical Theory

    The study of rhetorical theories from the pre-Socratic period to the contemporary period.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • COM 707 Family Communication

    This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth examination of communication as it functions in family systems.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 708 Patient-Provider Communication

    This course explores the nature of patient-provider interactions in health care contexts. Emphasis is placed on traditional and non-traditional health care providers, their patients, and interpersonal communication theories specific to health care interactions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 710 Contemporary Communication Education

    Examination of current practices and trends in Communication Education. Graduate teaching assistants in communication are required to take this course during the first semester of the assistantship. Course is only open to graduate teaching assistants in the Department of Communication.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Fall, Spring
  • COM 711 Conflict and Communication

    Equips students to understand the dynamics of interpersonal conflict and its resolution in a variety of community settings. Students will learn to analyze their own conflict styles and to develop self-regulation strategies for collaborative outcomes. The course covers conflict theory and research and applies these ideas to current community and organizational settings and diverse populations. Lectures/discussions by scholars, community leaders, and/or agency personnel who deal with conflict as well as simulations of conflict situations will be provided.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • COM 712 Quantitative Research Methods in Communication

    Quantitative research methodology in human communication. This course is designed to teach students how to read, interpret, and conduct research that uses numerical data. Some descriptive and inferential statistical analysis included. Students will design and carry out communication research using the methods they have learned.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 713 Public Relations Campaigns

    This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore the interface of profit and non-profit organizations with television, radio, newspapers and the internet to enhance organizational effectiveness. The course is project based focusing on developing specific media resources to meet strategic organizational communication goals.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 714 Qualitative Research Methods in Communication

    Qualitative research methodology in human communication. This course is designed to teach students how to read, interpret, and conduct various types of qualitative research. Students will design and carry out communication research using the methods they have learned.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • COM 716 Rhetorical Criticism

    Rhetorical criticism methodologies in human communication. This course is designed to teach students how to read, interpret, and conduct various types of rhetorical criticism. Major themes in rhetorical criticism explored include roles of the critic, audience, situation, theory, method, and artifact. Students will engage a rhetorical criticism project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • COM 717 Communication and Diversity in the Workplace

    Exploration of current theory and research regarding communication and diversity in the workplace. Study of practical applications for the assessment and training of communication skills relative to culture, race, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation and other diversity issues. Emphasis is placed on improving understanding of communication similarities and differences among diverse population groups. Includes readings, class discussion, observation, and/or class projects about assessment and training in communication skills in a diverse workplace.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 718 Applied Communication Research Methods

    permission of instructor.

    In-depth examination of a specific applied communication research methodology including: survey research, media criticism, communication audits, in-depth interviewing, and focus group interviewing. Topic will vary semester to semester. May be repeated but only three hours will count toward the degree.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 719 Ethical Issues in Communication

    Ethical theories and justification models are studied and then related to ethical decision making in a variety of communication contexts, including interpersonal communication, group communication, organizational communication, and public communication. The course will examine the components of good ethical decision making in communication, as well as obstacles that can stand in the way of responsible choices.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 722 Argumentation as Communication

    Argumentation as related to decision making, conflict resolution and negotiation in business, industry, government, and education.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 723 Contemporary Topics in Conflict

    An in-depth exploration of a specific topic in conflict. Topics will vary from semester to semester and may include but are not limited to the following: Dialogue and Facilitation, Conflict and Communication Coaching, Advanced Mediation, Family Conflict, Communication and Restorative Processes, Conflict Management in Schools, and Peace and Conflict. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours with permission of the department.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • COM 724 Interpersonal Communication

    Advanced study in interpersonal communication theories and concepts. Topics may include relational development and maintenance, conflict resolution, identity management, verbal and nonverbal message analysis, and information management.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 732 Small Group Communication

    Survey of theories and concepts related to communication in small groups. Topics include group development, roles, norms, leadership, cohesiveness, decision making, conflict, interaction analysis, and research approaches to small group communication.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 736 Organizational Communication

    Advanced study of communication in organizations. Application of traditional and contemporary theories of communication and organizations in current research and practice. Particular attention is given to the symbolic nature of organizing and to the analysis of organizational culture.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 739 Public Relations Theories and Applications

    Examination of concepts which underlie practices in public relations. Analysis of current practices and issues important in public relations for corporations, not-for-profit organizations. government agencies, and educational institutions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 750 Political Communication

    Examination of the communication process in modern political campaigns. Emphasis is placed on the role of communication strategies and tactics in political organization, message formation, fund raising, and mass media usage.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • COM 752 Communication Technology and Politics

    This course focuses on how communication technology contributes to the political process including campaigns, discourse, and information gathering. Heavy emphasis is placed on the distribution, reception, and process of political information through all communication technology, including social media, in terms of both theory and practice.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • COM 754 Presidential Rhetoric

    Examination of rhetoric used in governance, with a primary focus on presidential rhetoric. Emphasis is placed on history of presidential address, genre expectations for common presidential topics, political speechwriting, and rhetorical norms for legislative and judicial rhetoric.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring (odd-numbered years)
  • COM 760 Social Movement Communication

    Examination of social movement communication with emphasis on functionalist, dramatistic, and symbolic convergence theories. Study of movements' use of communication to generate discontent, mobilize and coordinate support, defend themselves and attack opponents, and negotiate with external groups. Critical analysis of collective actions such as student, civil rights, identity, labor, religious, feminist, lesbian/gay, and utopian movements.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring (even-numbered years)
  • COM 794 Conflict Internship

    6 hours of conflict courses; admission to the graduate certificate in Conflict and Dispute Resolution; and permission.

    This course allows students an applied opportunity to integrate theoretical material on conflict and dispute resolution in a variety of contexts and settings in which conflict occurs. May be taught concurrently with COM 494. Cannot receive credit for both COM 494 and COM 794.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Fall, Spring, Summer
  • COM 795 Communication Internship

    12 graduate hours in Communication; and permission of department.

    Independent projects in the various areas of communication. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Fall, Spring
  • COM 796 Independent Study

    permission of advisor.

    Study may be reading project or a practical application of theories. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Fall, Spring
  • COM 797 Seminar: Communication Theory

    Special topics in history, theory and criticism of communication. Topic may vary from semester to semester. With permission, may be repeated for a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • COM 799 Masters Thesis

    completion of 9 graduate hours in communication; and permission of the Director of Graduate Studies and admission to the thesis option; and complete 3 graduate hours in research methods or be concurrently enrolled in one of the following courses: COM 712, COM 714, COM 716, or COM 718.

    Independent research and study connected with preparation of thesis.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Fall, Spring

Journalism (JRN) courses

  • JRN 270 Introduction to Journalism

    Eligibility for ENG 110.

    Study of the purposes and forms of journalism. Includes writing the basic types of stories. Typing skills required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • JRN 300 Special Topics in Journalism

    A curse upon a single topic of current interest. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission if topics are different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • JRN 305 Service-Learning in Journalism

    30 hours and concurrent registration in a journalism course designated as a service-learning offering.

    This service component for an existing course incorporates community service with classroom instruction in journalism to provide an integrative learning experience that addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs. Includes 40 hours of service that benefits an external community organization, agency, or public service provider. Approved service placements and assignments will vary depending on the course topic and learning objectives; a list of approved placements and assignments is available from the instructor and the Citizenship and Service-Learning Office. May be repeated.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1Fall, Spring
  • JRN 370 News Reporting and Writing

    JRN 270.

    Instruction and practice in gathering news material, writing news reports, and editing copy. Includes introduction to news beats and specialized reporting techniques.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • JRN 374 Opinion Writing

    JRN 270.

    Instruction and practice in writing editorials, opinion columns, news analyses and critical reviews.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring (even-numbered years)
  • JRN 375 Feature Writing

    JRN 270.

    Practice in writing feature articles for print and online publications, including human interest stories, news features, personality profiles, how-to articles and historical pieces.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall (even-numbered years)
  • JRN 376 Business Reporting

    JRN 270.

    Instruction and practice in gathering information and writing business-related articles. The course covers interviewing and reporting techniques used to write business stories, including enterprise and trend stories as well as company profiles. The student also will gain an understanding of the importance of business news to public affairs.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall (odd-numbered years)
  • JRN 381 Broadcast News Writing

    JRN 270.

    Instruction and practice in basic scripting technique and writing skills needed to be a broadcast journalist. Through writing, students will examine the fundamentals of news judgment and the organizational style of storytelling for radio and television formats.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • JRN 384 Broadcast Performance

    JRN 270.

    The development of disciplines controlling vocal and visual mechanics as well as interpretative performance for announcers, newscasters, interviewers and narrators of various radio and television situations.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Spring
  • JRN 388 Electronic News Gathering

    JRN 381.

    Instruction and practice in news gathering techniques for television. Students will learn the basics of video production (shooting, editing, lighting, etc.) and reporting as well as advanced storytelling techniques, including solo reporting, recording natural sound packages, and live shot production and reporting. Emphasis is placed on gaining expertise in shooting and editing techniques as they apply to news.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Fall
  • JRN 407 Media Law

    History and application of the speech and press clause of the First Amendment; libel law, privacy law, copyright and other legal matters relating to mass media; relation of media law to journalistic ethics. May be taught concurrently with JRN 607. Cannot receive credit for both JRN 407 and JRN 607.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • JRN 476 Copy Editing and Design

    JRN 270.

    Principles and practices of copy-editing and rewriting news stories, headline writing, use of graphics, and makeup for print and online newspapers.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • JRN 478 Mobile Journalism

    JRN 270.

    Instruction and practice in multimedia reporting and publishing for mobile screens, including digital still photography, video, audio, social media, and text. The course will also address content management systems for the web, compatibility for mobile display, ethics, and legal concerns. Note: Students must have a current smartphone.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Fall, Spring
  • JRN 481 Multi-platform News Producing

    JRN 381.

    Instruction and practice in multi-platform news producing. Students will learn news judgment, how to create a rundown, and how to make critical decisions that are essential to producing.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Spring
  • JRN 492 Independent Study in Journalism

    JRN 270 and permission of instructor.

    Supervised independent study exploring topics determined by the student in consultation with journalism faculty member. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • JRN 493 Practicum in Journalism

    permission of instructor.

    Students will work with faculty supervisor on equipment-based journalism projects. Particular focus on leadership and communication skills, as well as using technology appropriate to the professional workplace. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department when project is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • JRN 572 Public Affairs Reporting

    JRN 370.

    Capstone course on instruction and practice in advanced reporting techniques, including gathering material and writing in-depth stories on public affairs issues, with an emphasis on state and local government.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • JRN 590 Issues in Journalism

    60 hours.

    A variable content course addressing topics of current interest as well as timeless issues. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission if topic is different. May be taught concurrently with JRN 690. Cannot receive credit for both JRN 590 and JRN 690.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • JRN 592 Newscast Practicum

    JRN 384 and JRN 388 and permission of instructor.

    Practical on-air experience with a student-run news program. Students will produce, report, anchor and work as studio crew for a weekly show. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    36Spring
  • JRN 595 Journalism Internship

    60 hours and permission of instructor.

    Work experience with a professional news organization. The student will be provided an educational opportunity not available through classroom experience. The instructor must approve all necessary paperwork before the student may begin the internship. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-6Fall, Spring
  • JRN 607 Media Law

    History and application of the speech and press clause of the First Amendment; libel law, privacy law, copyright and other legal matters relating to mass media; relation of media law to journalistic ethics. May be taught concurrently with JRN 407. Cannot receive credit for both JRN 407 and JRN 607.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • JRN 690 Issues in Journalism

    A variable content course addressing topics of current interest as well as timeless issues. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission if topic is different. May be taught concurrently with JRN 590. Cannot receive credit for both JRN 590 and JRN 690.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • JRN 695 Journalism Internship

    permission of instructor.

    Work experience with news organizations. The student will be provided an educational opportunity not available through classroom experience. The instructor must approve all necessary paperwork before the student may begin the internship. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours. May be taught concurrently with JRN 595. Cannot receive credit for both JRN 595 and JRN 695.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Fall, Spring

Mass Media (MED) courses

  • MED 120 Mass Media and Society

    Focus on Social and Behavioral Sciences

    The course examines theories and issues related to mass media. Students will understand the media's role through historical, present and future trends as agents of social change and cultural influence. The course will examine the media as an industry and its critical role as the fourth estate in American democracy.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Fall, SpringSBSC 100 - Introduction to Mass Communications.
  • MED 130 Media Professionalism

    An introduction to professionalism across all areas of media. Emphasis will be placed on collaborating to produce audio, video, web and social media content. Students create and maintain an online portfolio, learn to manage a professional online presence, and learn to write basic proposals for media projects.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 274 Introduction to Film

    Focus on Humanities

    The aesthetic and technical perspective of all types of motion pictures (narrative, non-narrative, experimental), using a number of selected domestic and foreign films as examples. Written analyses are required. Viewing of selected films outside of class time may be required.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Fall, SpringFILM 100 - Introduction to Film Studies.
  • MED 290 Fundamentals of Multimedia Design

    A broad exploration of multimedia design via readings and creative experiences. The following areas are considered: fundamental design principles, effective multimedia design, implementation and implications of multimedia, evaluation of existing multimedia examples, and collaboration in a group multimedia project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Fall, Spring
  • MED 300 Special Topics in Media

    A course upon a single topic of current interest. Topics may include: Asian Horror Cinema; Great Directors; Sci-Fi Noir; The Films of the Coen Brothers; Advanced Storytelling; Promoting Yourself in the Digital Age; Miyazaki!; Disney Animation: The Golden Age; Warner Bros. Animation: The Golden Age; Steadicam Practicum; Selling Your Idea: The Art of the Pitch; Collaborate: Make a Web Series; Storytelling Across All Media; Reality TV and Genre; Writing the Short Film. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours if topics are different. May be taught concurrently with MED 600. Cannot receive credit for both MED 300 and MED 600 for the same topic.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • MED 304 Media Effects

    MED 120.

    An examination of the history, development, and current state of media effects theory and research. Emphasis will be from a social science perspective and will consider behavioral, cognitive, emotional, and other media effects.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 305 Service-Learning in Media

    30 hours and concurrent registration in a media course designated as a service-learning offering.

    This service component for an existing course incorporates community service with classroom instruction in media to provide an integrative learning experience that addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and participation in public affairs. Includes 40 hours of service that benefits an external community organization, agency, or public service provider. Approved service placements and assignments will vary depending on the specific course topic and learning objectives; a list of approved placements and assignments is available from the instructor and the Citizenship and Service-Learning Office. May be repeated.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1Fall, Spring
  • MED 317 Introduction to Popular Culture Studies

    ENG 235  and MED 120 .

    An introduction to theories applied in the field of cultural studies. Emphasis will be placed on primary sources and their application to literature, media, and popular culture. Identical with ENG 317 . Cannot receive credit for both ENG 317  and MED 317.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • MED 320 Understanding the Broadcast Industry

    MED 120.

    An overview of national and local broadcast operations, including a detailed examination of national and local broadcast operations including organizational structure, management functions, program production and distribution strategies, program management, sales, promotion and research.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • MED 325 Media History

    The development and growth of U.S. mass media from their origins through the development of the internet. Emphasis will be placed on changing technologies, changing socio-political roles and changing structure of the mass media industry.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 345 Fundamentals of Media Production

    open to all students except Digital Film and Television Production, Mass Media (Comprehensive) and Electronic Arts majors.

    This course is designed for students who are not majoring in Digital Film and Television Production, Mass Media (Comprehensive) or Electronic Arts. The course will provide an opportunity to learn and practice basic film and video production techniques while applying knowledge from lectures. The individual and group projects completed in the course will emphasize preproduction planning and creative use of the camera, lighting, sound and editing. Students will learn a wide range of practical production strategies.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    312Fall, Spring
  • MED 355 Social Media

    MED 120.

    An overview of how social media are changing the ways we communicate, collaborate and create through digital media. Students will examine the historical, theoretical and practical implications of social media on human communication through a series of critical readings, media presentations and practical encounters with social networking.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • MED 360 Beginning Screenwriting

    ENG 110.

    An introduction to the fundamental craft of writing for film and television. Students will learn format, structure, and the principles of character-based storytelling, as well as the basics of the film and television industry. Combining lectures and workshops, students will focus on scene work before outlining and completing a short film script. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 660. Cannot receive credit for both MED 360 and MED 660 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 361 Introduction to Sound Recording for Media

    A foundational audio course with an emphasis on field and custom sound recording. The course is designed to invoke awareness and creativity of sound as an art form to deliver the message and convey the feeling. Fundamental recording technologies and techniques will be introduced to record the sounds from the field and live events, and to edit and mix them with basic tactics. Students are expected to apply the knowledge to design and manipulate sounds creatively for a variety of applications, such as film, television, radio, podcasting, games, and immersive media.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Spring
  • MED 365 Digital Film and Media Production

    major in Digital Film and Television Production, Film and Media Studies, or Electronic Arts, or permission of instructor.

    A study of visual aesthetics and production techniques used in film and video. Students will learn image, motion design, sound, and nonlinear concepts that will be reinforced through video production exercises.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Fall, Spring
  • MED 370 Color Theory

    MED 345  or MED 365  or permission of instructor.

    The course provides an exploration of how color theory can drive a story, both visually and psychologically. Students will understand the relationship between colors and learn to design visually, using the principles of color theory to influence a viewers' emotions. Students will examine genre, theme, and color concepts to learn effective communication through aesthetic design to produce a portfolio-worthy project based within their major.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    321Upon demand
  • MED 374 History of Film I

    An examination of the evolution of film technique and theory from 1895 to World War II. Emphasis is placed on the social impact of film and on the artistic and technical aspects of the medium. Viewing of selected films outside of class may be required. May be taught concurrently with MED 674. Cannot receive credit for both MED 374 and MED 674.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Fall
  • MED 375 History of Film II

    An examination of the evolution of film technique and theory from World War II to the present. Emphasis is placed on the social impact of film and on the artistic and technical aspects of the medium. Viewing of selected films outside of class may be required. May be taught concurrently with MED 675. Cannot receive credit for both MED 375 and MED 675.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Spring
  • MED 381 Broadcast Writing

    ENG 110.

    An examination of the principles and production techniques involved in writing broadcast copy. Three areas will be investigated in depth: copywriting for radio and television, news writing and feature story preparation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 382 Audio Post-Production

    MED 461 or permission of instructor.

    Study and exploration of the creativity of sound through recording and editing/mixing, with an emphasis on sound design for motion pictures, in studio and post-production settings. Students will learn to "see" the diegetic and non-diegetic sounds in movies and create them, particularly in the form of ADRs and Foleys, to improve and enrich movie soundtracks and ultimately enhance storytelling. The essential sound recording and editing technology, workflow and techniques will be taught and applied to a set of designated hands-on projects.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Upon demand
  • MED 383 Television Production

    MED 365 or JRN 388.

    Orientation to and practical experience in creating TV production in the professional studio setting.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Fall, Spring
  • MED 385 Client-Based Video Production

    MED 345 or MED 365.

    This intermediate-level production course focuses on how to work with a client when producing video packages for business, corporate, commercial, and other forms of non-fiction media production. Students will learn how to interview a client to find out their needs, then go through the pre-to-post production process on how to create original content packages for the client. This course is geared toward creating viable content for the students' demo reels, and will work with a community partner to produce real-world videos for use by the organization(s) the course will be working with during the semester.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    321Fall
  • MED 390 Interactive Web Design

    MED 290.

    An overview of multimedia design and multimedia-specific concepts. The course will look at multimedia design standards on multiple levels; content design and creation, user experience, navigation, interface, functionality, interactivity, multimedia integration, etc. Students will create and publish a website.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Fall, Spring
  • MED 412 Documentary Storytelling

    Students gain a general understanding of the history and theory of documentary film by investigating the major creative approaches, the impact of technological advances in filmmaking, and the differences and similarities between nonfiction and fiction narratives in film. Students learn to write effective film criticism - to craft a well-reasoned critical analysis of a documentary film.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • MED 450 Media Ecology

    A historical examination of communicative media technologies, how they affect human perception, understanding, feeling, and value, and how each new technological development fundamentally changed society.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 454 Media Analysis and Criticism

    MED 120; and COM 209 or MED 304.

    The political, cultural, economic and social impact of the American media and their content as they affect and influence the individual and the culture.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 461 Sound Editing

    MED 365.

    An introduction to the theoretical and practical principles of sound editing for digital film and TV post-production. Students will be exposed to sound-design ideas and learn sound-editing skills and techniques using a professional sound-editing program. Students will design and build soundtracks for digital film and TV with both aesthetic and technical considerations.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Fall, Spring
  • MED 462 TV/Film Producing

    An in-depth examination of the producer's various roles in television and film production. Practical experience with grant writing, script breakdowns, scheduling, budgets, and business plan development will provide the student with an understanding of the various aspects of production and how the development and structure of the script can affect the production's outcome. May be taught concurrently with MED 642. Cannot receive credit for both MED 462 and MED 642.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall
  • MED 463 Writing Adaptations for Television and Film

    Study and practice in adapting material for television or film. During the course, students will select a source to adapt and will outline and begin writing their script. Variable content course. May be repeated when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 663. Cannot receive credit for both MED 463 and MED 663 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 464 Genre Writing for Film and Television

    An overview of the expectations and requirements of various genres in both film and television. Students will study past, present and possible future trends of each genre in the professional marketplace. The course will focus on what defines audience expectations as students write for different genres. Variable content course. May be repeated when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 664. Cannot receive credit for both MED 464 and MED 664 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 465 Principles of Cinematography

    MED 365.

    The fundamental theoretical and practical principles of using the camera and lighting for film and video. Studio and location lighting, camera techniques, and aesthetics will be explored in depth. Students will light and shoot a variety of exercises designed to illustrate the theoretical, practical, and aesthetic issues explored in this course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Fall, Spring
  • MED 466 Editing for Film and Television

    MED 365.

    An examination of the theoretical, historical, and practical principles involved in editing narrative film and video. Students will learn intermediate editing techniques. Editing theory and aesthetics will be addressed through a series of editing exercises pulled from feature films and television series. Issues of narrative clarity, dramatic focus, pacing, and effective storytelling will be emphasized.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Fall
  • MED 470 Special Topics in Film

    An examination of special topics from historical or current interest in film. Topic will vary from semester to semester depending on student interest and faculty availability. Approved recurring course topics: Animation, Asian Cinema, Postmodern Trends in Movies, Women Directors, Women Characters in Film. Viewing of selected films outside of class may be required. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when the topic is different. May be taught concurrently with MED 690. Cannot receive credit for both MED 470 and MED 690 for the same topic.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Upon demand
  • MED 472 Directing the Short Film

    MED 345 or MED 365.

    An examination of the theoretical, historical and practical fundamentals of film directing. Students will explore techniques for successful script/scene analysis, visualization, collaboration with cast and crew, and set management. Via a series of short but increasingly complex projects, students will gain an understanding of what it takes to successfully lead a production.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Fall, Spring
  • MED 483 Intermediate Production

    permission of instructor.

    Secondary level of multi-camera or film-style production. Students serve as production assistants and crew members, generally on a larger project being led by students in a senior-level capstone or electronic arts course, under the supervision of and in tandem with another class.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    314Upon demand
  • MED 490 Advanced Interactivity Multimedia Design

    MED 290.

    An advanced study of interactive multimedia design based on human-computer interaction principles. Course will include the creation of a project incorporating interactivity as a core element. Topics may include mobile applications, site-specific multimedia design, trans-media, advanced physical interactivity, or advanced Flash design. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours if topics are different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Spring (even-numbered years)
  • MED 492 Independent Study in Electronic Media

    admission to a departmental major, permission of instructor and 6 hours of upper division MED or JRN coursework.

    Supervised independent study exploring selected areas determined by the student in consultation with the media faculty. Coursework may include readings, term papers, or projects. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • MED 493 Practicum in Electronic Media

    permission of instructor.

    Students will work closely with faculty supervisor to produce and create film, television, or internet projects. Particular focus on leadership and communication skills, as well as using technology appropriate to the professional workplace. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department when project is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-3Upon demand
  • MED 498 Senior Project in Electronic Arts

    ART 300 and permission of instructor.

    Admission to this course is contingent upon the successful completion of the Electronics Arts junior portfolio review and the achievement of a C grade or better in all required option courses completed at the time of the junior portfolio review. Under advisement from faculty, EA students will form production teams consisting of computer animation, video, interactive new media and audio studies students. Each team will produce a broadcast-quality project over two semesters. The first semester will be spent in pre-production preparations for the approved senior project. The second semester will involve production and post-production of the approved project. This course must be repeated in sequence for a total of six hours across a single academic year. Identical with ART 498. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Fall, Spring
  • MED 512 Documentary Film Practicum

    MED 345 or MED 365.

    Students study documentary techniques in video, audio, and photography leading to the development of a formal documentary project proposal. Emphasis is placed on idea development and pre-production with journalistic research standards. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to documentary projects currently in production as well as complete several, short documentary production exercises.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Fall
  • MED 552 Preproduction

    permission of instructor.

    Principles, skills, and techniques involved in preproduction for television or film. Practical experience in writing, rewriting, and producing elements to develop a film, pilot, series or season of an existing series. Producing elements include fundraising, location scouting, designing and creating sets, acquiring props and wardrobe, casting, workflow, technical elements, system needs, and marketing. May be taught concurrently with MED 652. Cannot receive credit for both MED 552 and MED 652.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    313Fall
  • MED 561 Sound Mixing

    MED 461.

    An in-depth exploration of the art of sound design for digital film and TV. Students will learn how to carry out the aesthetic considerations of sound through the mixing process. Emphasis will be placed on advanced sound editing for sub- and final mixing, mix engineering, sound-effect processing and surround-sound practice. Students will learn how to mix a movie's dialogue, sound effects, ambience and music into stereo and surround tracks. May be taught concurrently with MED 661. Cannot receive credit for both MED 561 and MED 661.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Fall
  • MED 562 Digital Filmmaking Capstone

    six hours of intermediate production courses and permission of the instructor.

    A film-style production class in high-definition digital filmmaking. Students will form small production teams to plan, design, and produce short narrative films. May be taught concurrently with MED 662. Cannot receive credit for both MED 562 and MED 662.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Spring
  • MED 565 Intermediate Screenwriting

    Writing the feature film screenplay. Students will study format, structure, and the effective tools of screenwriting. The course will include discussion of feature films and their screenplays, as well as the business of professional screenwriting. Students will create a premise, outline their projects, and write the first act of a feature-length film. Variable content course. May be repeated when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 667. Cannot receive credit for both MED 565 and MED 667 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 566 Writing for Television

    This course will focus on the foundations of structure, character, conflict, dialogue, and setting, and how to apply these elements to storytelling on the small screen. Students will learn to pitch their ideas effectively to writer-producers and then outline, write, and polish a spec script for a currently running television series. Variable content course. May be repeated when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 668. Cannot receive credit for both MED 566 and MED 668 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 568 Writing the Web Series

    permission of instructor.

    An advanced practicum in conceiving and collaboratively writing an original episodic series for the web. Students will work together in an intimate writers' room atmosphere to develop original web series for future production at Missouri State. Emphasis will be on sustainable premises, filmable budgets, and compelling character-based conflicts. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 671. Cannot receive credit for both MED 568 and MED 671 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • MED 569 Advanced Screenwriting

    MED 565 or MED 566, and permission of instructor.

    Focus on group discussion and criticism. Students either build on past work to complete a feature length screenplay or else write a new television pilot and series bible. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 672. Cannot receive credit for both MED 569 and MED 672 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • MED 570 Film Theory

    An analysis of the art of film by using classical and contemporary film theory to investigate such aspects as the relationship between form and content, visual style and the nature of pictorial motion. Weekly screenings and discussions of short films, excerpts, complete classics and contemporary films. May be taught concurrently with MED 670. Cannot receive credit for both MED 570 and MED 670.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    331Spring
  • MED 580 Media in Politics

    MED 120; and COM 209 or MED 304.

    An in-depth examination of the role of print and electronic media in American politics. Emphasis is placed on media coverage of government, social issues, and political campaigns. The course examines both the strategies of paid media and the media's coverage of politics as news. May be taught concurrently with MED 680. Cannot receive credit for both MED 580 and MED 680.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • MED 581 Media Ethics and Law

    MED 120 and MED 304.

    An examination of legal and ethical issues in media, including news and information media, entertainment media, and social media. Focus on the historical foundations of media rights and regulation and the application of ethical principles to past and current debates about media practice and content. May be taught concurrently with MED 681. Cannot receive credit for both MED 581 and MED 681. Public Affairs Capstone Experience course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 582 Producing the Feature Film

    MED 365.

    This course will present the essential components of entrepreneurial producing, including obtaining investors, pre-sales, international co-financing and production, business negotiations, collaborating with unions and film commissions, procuring A-List talent, and others. Students will workshop an existing feature film with the intentions of "pitching" a modern remake to ideal investors and distribution outlets. Students will design a comprehensive package - including financing, budgeting, marketing and distribution strategy - that is realistic in the contemporary marketplace. May be taught concurrently with MED 684. Cannot receive credit for both MED 582 and MED 684.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • MED 583 Advanced Television Production

    MED 383.

    Principles, skills, and techniques involved in advanced television production. Practical experience in writing, producing, directing and editing non-fiction television content for a video-magazine, news show, and/or promotions. May be taught concurrently with MED 683. Cannot receive credit for both MED 583 and MED 683.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    322Upon demand
  • MED 593 Rewriting Film and Television Scripts

    MED 569.

    An examination of the many phases of rewriting television or feature length screenplays for professional submission. Students will rewrite and workshop their scripts with an eye toward the current marketplace. Variable content course. May be taught concurrently with MED 693. Cannot receive credit for both MED 593 and MED 669 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Spring
  • MED 595 Media Internship

    60 hours and permission of instructor.

    Work experience with a professional media organization. The student will be provided an educational opportunity not available through classroom experience. The instructor must approve all necessary paperwork before the student may begin the internship. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours. May be taught concurrently with MED 695. Cannot receive credit for both MED 595 and MED 695.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    1-6Fall, Spring
  • MED 596 Postproduction

    permission of instructor.

    Principles, skills, and techniques involved in postproduction for television or film. Practical experience in post workflow, editing, sound design, mixing and marketing to create professional media products. May be taught concurrently with MED 696. Cannot receive credit for both MED 596 and MED 696.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    313Summer
  • MED 597 Advanced Studies in Media

    permission of instructor.

    In-depth examination of a special topic in media. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours. May be taught concurrently with MED 697. Cannot receive credit for both MED 597 and MED 697.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    33Upon demand
  • MED 600 Special Topics in Media

    A course upon a single topic of current interest. Topics may include: Asian Horror Cinema; Great Directors; Sci-Fi Noir; The Films of the Coen Brothers; Advanced Storytelling; Promoting Yourself in the Digital Age; Miyazaki!; Disney Animation: The Golden Age; Warner Bros. Animation: The Golden Age; Steadicam Practicum; Selling Your Idea: The Art of the Pitch; Collaborate: Make a Web Series; Storytelling Across All Media; Reality TV and Genre; Writing the Short Film. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours if topics are different. May be taught concurrently with MED 300. Cannot receive credit for both MED 300 and MED 600 for the same topic.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • MED 610 Playwriting I

    An introduction to the craft of playwriting with a focus on process. Students learn dramatic structure, complete writing assignments, and analyze their scripts in workshops before ultimately writing and revising a 20-30 minute one-act play.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • MED 642 TV/Film Producing

    An in-depth examination of the producer's various roles in television and film production. Practical experience with grant writing, script breakdowns, scheduling, budgets, and business plan development will provide the student with an understanding of the various aspects of production and how the development and structure of the script can affect the production's outcome. May be taught concurrently with MED 462. Cannot receive credit for both MED 462 and MED 642. 

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • MED 652 Preproduction

    permission of instructor.

    Principles, skills, and techniques involved in preproduction for television or film. Practical experience in writing, rewriting, and producing elements to develop a film, pilot, series or season of an existing series. Producing elements include fundraising, location scouting, designing and creating sets, acquiring props and wardrobe, casting, workflow, technical elements, system needs, and marketing. May be taught concurrently with MED 552. Cannot receive credit for both MED 552 and MED 652.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    313Fall
  • MED 660 Beginning Screenwriting

    An introduction to the fundamental craft of writing for film and television. Students will learn format, structure, and the principles of character-based storytelling, as well as the basics of the film and television industry. Combining lectures and workshops, students will focus on scene work before outlining and completing a short film script. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 360. Cannot receive credit for both MED 360 and MED 660 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 661 Sound Mixing

    An in-depth exploration of the art of sound design for digital film and TV. Students will learn how to carry out the aesthetic considerations of sound through the mixing process. Emphasis will be placed on advanced sound editing for sub- and final mixing, mix engineering, sound-effect processing and surround-sound practice. Students will learn how to mix a movie's dialogue, sound effects, ambience and music into stereo and surround tracks. May be taught concurrently with MED 561. Cannot receive credit for both MED 561 and MED 661.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    331Fall
  • MED 662 Digital Filmmaking Capstone

    six hours of intermediate production courses and permission of the instructor.

    A film-style production class in high-definition digital filmmaking. Students will form small production teams to plan, design, and produce short narrative films. May be taught concurrently with MED 562. Cannot receive credit for both MED 562 and MED 662.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Spring
  • MED 663 Writing Adaptations for Television and Film

    Study and practice in adapting material for television or film. During the course, students will select a source to adapt and will outline and begin writing their script. Variable content course. May be repeated when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 463. Cannot receive credit for both MED 463 and MED 663 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 664 Genre Writing for Television and Film

    An overview of the expectations and requirements of various genres in both film and television. Students will study past, present and possible future trends of each genre in the professional marketplace. The course will focus on what defines audience expectations as students write for different genres. Variable content course. May be repeated when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 464. Cannot receive credit for both MED 464 and MED 664 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 667 Intermediate Screenwriting

    Writing the feature film screenplay. Students will study format, structure, and the effective tools of screenwriting. The course will include discussion of feature films and their screenplays, as well as the business of professional screenwriting. Students will create a premise, outline their projects, and write the first act of a feature-length film. Variable content course. May be repeated when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 565. Cannot receive credit for both MED 565 and MED 667 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 668 Writing for Television

    This course will focus on the foundations of structure, character, conflict, dialogue, and setting, and how to apply these elements to storytelling on the small screen. Students will learn to pitch their ideas effectively to writer-producers and then outline, write, and polish a spec script for a currently running television series. Variable content course. May be repeated when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 566. Cannot receive credit for both MED 566 and MED 668 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 670 Film Theory

    An analysis of the art of film by using classical and contemporary film theory to investigate such aspects as the relationship between form and content, visual style, and the nature of pictorial motion. Weekly screenings and discussions of short film excerpts, complete classics and contemporary films. May be taught concurrently with MED 570. Cannot receive credit for both MED 570 and MED 670.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    331Spring
  • MED 671 Writing the Web Series

    An advanced practicum in conceiving and collaboratively writing an original episodic series for the web. Students will work together in an intimate writers' room atmosphere to develop original web series for future production at Missouri State. Emphasis will be on sustainable premises, filmable budgets, and compelling character-based conflicts. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 568. Cannot receive credit for both MED 568 and MED 671 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • MED 672 Advanced Screenwriting

    MED 667 or MED 668 or permission of Instructor.

    Focus on group discussion and criticism. Students either build on past work to complete a feature length screenplay or else write a new television pilot and series bible. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when project changes. May be taught concurrently with MED 569. Cannot receive credit for both MED 569 and MED 672 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • MED 674 History of Film I

    An examination of the evolution of film technique and theory from 1895 to World War II. Emphasis is placed on the social impact of film and on the artistic and technical aspects of the medium. Viewing of selected films outside of class may be required. May be taught concurrently with MED 374. Cannot receive credit for both MED 374 and MED 674.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    331Fall
  • MED 675 History of Film II

    An examination of the evolution of film technique and theory from World War II to the present. Emphasis is placed on the social impact of film and on the artistic and technical aspects of the medium. Viewing of selected films outside of class may be required. May be taught concurrently with MED 375. Cannot receive credit for both MED 375 and MED 675.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • MED 680 Media in Politics

    An in-depth examination of the role of print and electronic media in American politics. Emphasis is placed on media coverage of government, social issues, and political campaigns. The course examines both the strategies of paid media and the media's coverage of politics as news. May be taught concurrently with MED 580. Cannot receive credit for both MED 580 and MED 680.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • MED 681 Media Ethics and Law

    An examination of legal and ethical issues in media, including news and information media, entertainment media, and social media. Focus on the historical foundations of media rights and regulation and the application of ethical principles to past and current debates about media practice and content. May be taught concurrently with MED 581. Cannot receive credit for both MED 581 and MED 681. 

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall, Spring
  • MED 683 Advanced Television Production

    MED 383.

    Principles, skills, and techniques involved in advanced television production. Practical experience in writing, producing, directing and editing non-fiction television content for a video-magazine, news show, and/or promotions. May be taught concurrently with MED 583. Cannot receive credit for both MED 583 and MED 683.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Upon demand
  • MED 684 Producing the Feature Film

    This course will present the essential components of entrepreneurial producing, including obtaining investors, pre-sales, international co-financing and production, business negotiations, collaborating with unions and film commissions, procuring A-List talent, and others. Students will workshop an existing feature film with the intentions of "pitching" a modern remake to ideal investors and distribution outlets. Students will design a comprehensive package - including financing, budgeting, marketing and distribution strategy - that is realistic in the contemporary marketplace. May be taught concurrently with MED 582. Cannot receive credit for both MED 582 and MED 684.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • MED 690 Special Topics in Film

    An examination of special topics from historical or current interest in film. Topic will vary from semester to semester depending on student interest and faculty availability. Approved recurring course topics: Animation, Asian Cinema, Postmodern Trends in Movies, Women Directors, Women Characters in Film. Viewing of selected films outside of class may be required. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours when the topic is different. May be taught concurrently with MED 470. Cannot receive credit for both MED 470 and MED 690 for the same topic.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    331Upon demand
  • MED 693 Rewriting Film and Television Scripts

    MED 672.

    An examination of the many phases of rewriting television or feature length screenplays for professional submission. Students will rewrite and workshop their scripts with an eye toward the current marketplace. Variable content course. May be taught concurrently with MED 593. Cannot receive credit for both MED 593 and MED 693 for the same project.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • MED 695 Media Internship

    permission of instructor.

    Work experience with a professional media organization. The student will be provided an educational opportunity not available through classroom experience. The instructor must approve all necessary paperwork before the student may begin the internship. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours. May be taught concurrently with MED 595. Cannot receive credit for both MED 595 and MED 695.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Fall, Spring
  • MED 696 Postproduction

    permission of instructor.

    Principles, skills, and techniques involved in postproduction for television or film. Practical experience in post workflow, editing, sound design, mixing and marketing to create professional media products. May be taught concurrently with MED 596. Cannot receive credit for both MED 596 and MED 696.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    313Summer
  • MED 697 Advanced Studies in Media

    permission of instructor.

    In-depth examination of a special topic in media. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours. May be taught concurrently with MED 597. Cannot receive credit for both MED 597 and MED 697.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Upon demand
  • MED 704 Theory and Research in Mass Communication

    Survey of theories, models and research in mass communication. Topics include propaganda, attitude change, agenda setting and media effects research.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • MED 711 Fundamentals of Screenwriting

    An introduction to the fundamental craft of writing for film, television, and the web. Students learn format, structure, and the principles of character-based storytelling, as well as some basics of the film and television industry. Combining lectures and workshops, students focus on scene work before outlining and completing a short film script.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    331Fall
  • MED 712 Feature Film Writing I

    The course will include discussion of feature films and their screenplays, as well as the business of professional screenwriting. Students will create a premise, outline their projects, and write the first act of a feature-length film.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    331Fall
  • MED 713 Feature Film Writing II

    MED 712.

    Students workshop and complete the scripts for the feature films begun in MED 712.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    331Spring
  • MED 714 Writing Episodic Television

    MED 711.

    Focus on the television industry and how to apply the fundamentals of screenwriting to episodic storytelling for the small screen. Students will learn to pitch their ideas effectively to writer-producers and then outline, write, and polish a spec script for a currently running television series.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    331Spring
  • MED 715 Rewriting

    MED 713.

    An examination of the many phases of rewriting feature-length screenplays for professional submission. Students will rewrite and workshop their scripts with an eye toward the current marketplace.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    331Summer
  • MED 716 Writing Episodic Pilots

    MED 714 or permission of instructor.

    Students will analyze successful series pilots and learn about the process and demands of creating an original television or web series. After selecting an original premise, students then design a series bible, and write a completed pilot episode for a unique television or web series.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    331Fall
  • MED 717 Portfolio Script I

    permission of instructor.

    Intensive workshop of a new feature film script, full-length play, series pilot, or equivalent work aimed for the current marketplace. This course will include pitching, premise selection, in-class staged readings, and roundtable feedback sessions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Fall
  • MED 718 Portfolio Script II

    MED 717.

    Advanced workshop of the revised feature film script, full-length play, series pilot, or equivalent work developed in MED 717. Students will complete extensive rewrites and polishes to prepare the script for professional submission.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • MED 719 Portfolio Review

    MED 718 or permission of instructor.

    Students will prepare their professional writing portfolio, completing multiple rewrites and polishes to get all components (two features, two shorts, a pilot and spec TV script, and a one-act play) ready for professional submission.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    33Spring
  • MED 764 Visual Storytelling

    An introductory course in cinematic storytelling. Students will write, shoot, and edit short video production projects, analyzing and discussing them in class.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Fall
  • MED 765 Directing for Film and Stage

    An examination of the basic principles, skills, and techniques of directing for both film and the stage. Students will explore techniques for successful script/scene analysis, visualization, collaboration with cast and crew, and set management. They will also learn procedures in selecting, analyzing, casting, and producing a play. Through hands-on assignments students will gain practical experience in both areas of directing.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Spring
  • MED 766 Pre-Production Practicum for Stage and Screen

    MED 684 and MED 642.

    Practicum in pre-production for both web series and stage projects.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Fall
  • MED 767 Staged Production

    MED 766.

    Practicum in staging productions for web series and theater.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Spring
  • MED 781 Producing the Short Film

    permission of instructor.

    Practicum in producing a short narrative film. Students will work closely with faculty supervisor. Variable topic course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department when project is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • MED 782 Producing the Web Series

    permission of instructor.

    Practicum in producing a narrative scripted web series. Students will work closely with faculty supervisor. Variable topic course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department when project is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • MED 783 Producing the Multicam Show

    permission of instructor.

    Practicum in producing multicamera studio projects. Students will work closely with faculty supervisor. Variable topic course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department when project is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • MED 784 Producing the Documentary

    permission of instructor.

    Practicum in producing either short or feature documentary project. Students will work closely with faculty supervisor. Variable topic course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department when project is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • MED 785 Producing the Longform Narrative

    permission of instructor.

    Practicum in producing components of feature films. Students will work closely with faculty supervisor. Variable topic course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department when project is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • MED 786 Producing the Stage Play

    permission of instructor.

    Practicum in theater producing. Students will work closely with faculty supervisor. Variable topic course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department when project is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • MED 792 Independent Study in Media

    permission of instructor.

    Supervised independent study in research of theories or application of learning through a creative project. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours if the content of the research or the project is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • MED 793 Practicum in Producing or Production

    Students will work closely with faculty supervisor to produce and create film, television, or internet projects. Particular focus on leadership and communication skills, as well as using technology appropriate to the professional workplace. Variable topic course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours with permission of the department when project is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand
  • MED 794 Practicum in Playwriting

    permission of instructor.

    Supervised independent writing project in playwriting. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours if the content of the research or the project is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-6Upon demand