Department of Religious Studies

Adjunct and Emeritus Faculty

Adjunct Faculty

Mark Boyer, MA

Email: MarkBoyer@MissouriState.edu
Courses: New Testament; Bible and Film; The Bible and Lord of the Rings
Indiana University, 1981 

Kenneth Elkins, ABD

Email: KElkins@MissouriState.edu
Courses: Religion in America; Holocaust
University of Washington-Seattle

David Embree, MA

Email: DEmbree@MissouriState.edu
Courses: Religion and Society; New American Religions
Missouri State University, 1984

J. Jeff Fugitt, MDiv, ABD

Email: JFugitt@MissouriState.edu
Courses: Introduction to Religion 
Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1990
University of Missouri-Kansas City

William Marler, MDiv

Email: WMarler@MissouriState.edu
Courses: Religion in America
Concordia Seminary, 1983

Phil Snider, DMin

Email: PhilSnider@MissouriState.edu
Courses: Introduction to Religion 
Chicago Theological Seminary, 2009

Emeritus Faculty

Stan Burgess

Email: rvburgess@earthlink.net
Ph.D.  University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, 1971
M.A.   University of Michigan, 1959
B.A. University of Michigan, 1958

Field of Specialization: History (Major field: Renaissance and Reformation History; Minor fields: History of Rome, Medieval Europe, Tudor-Stuart England, and Political Theory).

LaMoine F. DeVries

Email: LaMoineDeVries@missouristate.edu

My interest in Biblical studies has been in the area of Biblical Archaeology and Biblical Backgrounds. For five years I worked with Joseph Callaway as a research assistant on the Ai-Raddana excavation project materials. My doctoral dissertation focused on an archaeological study of incense stands and small altars from the period of the Judges. Because of this interest, most of my writing and research (approximately 55 articles and a book entitled Cities of the Bible: An introduction to the Archaeology, Geography and History of Biblical Sites) are related to the study of Biblical Archaeology and Biblical Backgrounds.

J. Ramsey Michaels

Email: profram@comcast.net

Field of Specialization: Biblical studies - New Testament

Recent Activity: Published commentaries on Revelation, Hebrews, and most recently on the Gospel of John, a 1094-page contribution to the New International Commentary on the New Testament (NICNT), from Eerdmans publishing company in Grand Rapids; an article in the Harvard Theological Review on "Charles Thomson and the First American New Testament," and in the Flannery O'Connor Review an article, "A World with Devils Filled: The Hawkes-O'Connor Debate Revisited." New book coming out, Passing by the Dragon: The Biblical Tales of Flannery O'Connor (Wipf & Stock publishers). Since 1995 taught eleven courses at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, CA and Seattle, WA, and eleven courses at Bangor Theological Seminary in Portland, ME.

Dr. Charles W. Hedrick

Email: CharlesHedrick@MissouriState.edu
BA 1952 Mississippi College
BD 1962 Golden Gate Southern Baptist Seminary
MA 1968 University of Southern California
PhD 1977 Claremont Graduate School

My research interests should be described as focusing on Christian origins and I teach subjects related to that interest at Missouri State (viz., Jesus of Nazareth, New Testament Introduction, Parables, Gnosticism, etc.). My publications have been primarily in the area of Gospels, Nag Hammadi, Gnosticism, the Greco-Roman world, and related topics. My book on parables, published in 1994 (Parables as Poetic Fictions. The Creative Voice of Jesus [Hendrickson]) raises, I think, some significant issues for the study of the parables, which is the backbone of the Jesus tradition. My two most recent books (I do not recommend having two books in press at the same time) are The Gospel of the Savior. A New Ancient Gospel (Polebridge, 1999) and When History and Faith Collide: Studying Jesus (Hendrickson, 1999).  The Gospel of the Savior is the first publication of a new gospel manuscript in Coptic whose composition dates before the latter half of the second century C.E. When History and Faith Collide is an inductive study of the problem of attempting to describe Jesus of Nazareth as a historical figure. It is written for college students, and is intended to help them engage the problem for themselves.

Dr. Karl W. Luckert

Email: kwluckert@msn.com

Since retirement, in 1999, I tried to reorient myself in the larger world which I barely understood enough for teaching at the university. My retirement ambition is to improve on all the mistakes that I taught over the years—before my time arrives for the required entrance examination to the Big University.

Over the years of retirement I began to doubt the suitability of the German and English languages to communicate about any religious subject matter. So I undertook to compose music instead, as an anticipatory oratorical epic titled “Peace of Abraham.” It is for solo and choir voices. Jonas Nordwall, a concert organist of world renown, has written the accompaniment for organ. So, if ever there will arise an occasion to celebrate peace breaking out among the religious offspring of Abraham, we are prepared to provide some merriment. The piece takes about eighty minutes to perform.

In 2006 I undertook a practical organizational approach to help enhance Muslim education for mullahs in China. Persuading six honorable American men, I organized with their help a non-profit entity named “Road to Peace Inc.” Missouri State’s president emeritus, John Keiser, served as our president. An exploratory planning trip with two Hui Muslim academicians was successfully completed in 2006. For 2008, foundation grant money for a first educational tour through the United States, for six Chinese mullahs, had been secured. But it was a time of unrest in China’s western regions—the sensitive year of the Chinese Olympics. Passports for all mullahs were cancelled. While our NPO is now dissolved, I am back to reorganizing history of religions subject matter; and I am composing music for the eventuality that angelic acquaintances in my future might be impressionable with lyrics and harmonics.

In China, 2002-2008, I continued fieldwork with Zhang Zuotang regarding Yin Yang shamanism along the upper reaches of the Yellow River. Gradually these efforts yielded truer bearings vis-à-vis Asia’s prehistoric religions. But meanwhile in eastern Anatolia, the discovery and excavations at Göbekli Tepe have changed the historical starting points for studying any of the religions that I am familiar with. In Fall 2012 the manuscript titled “Stone Age Religion at Göbekli Tepe and Beyond—Atonement at Abdomen Hill Twelve Thousand Years ago and around the Planet” has finally gotten finished enough to send it off to a prospective publisher.