Hazardous Waste and Hazardous Materials Contingency Plan

This plan is modified for inclusion on the Environmental Management webpage.  A copy of the complete plan is available through the Environmental Management office.

EPA ID No. MOR000000331

MDNR ID No. 028588

Spills

Emergency Equipment

Site Control & Responsibilities

Clean-Up & Disposal

Incident Termination

Decontamination

After-Action Review

Plan Amendments

Training

Arrangements with Local Emergency Agencies

Emergency Coordinators

Notification Procedures

Spills

All chemical, biological, and radiological emergencies must be reported immediately to the Missouri State University Safety & Transportation Department by calling 6-5509 or 911.  This document addresses the Spill Response and Control Measures to be taken by Missouri State University students, faculty, and staff. 

The following procedures should be followed for a release involving a hazardous substance. A hazardous substance is defined as a chemical, biological or radioactive material.

In the event of a hazardous substance or hazardous material spill on the Missouri State University campus the first person that becomes aware of the problem will immediately follow these procedures:

  1. Warn fellow workers and supervisors
  2. Evacuate the area and preclude inadvertent intrusion until the spill is eliminated
  3. Notify the Director of Environmental Management (DEM) (6-8334) and the Safety and Transportation Department (6-5911).
  4. Take action to contain the spill if possible, without jeopardizing personal well-being.

The procedures described herein cover incidents on the Springfield campus only.  Spills onto adjacent property not owned by Missouri State University and on properties outside Springfield are not included.  Spills not on the Springfield Campus should be reported immediately to the Springfield Emergency Agencies by calling 911.

Biology/Biomedical Sciences Labs and Biological Agents

Please note: This information is provided as a general procedure.  Only properly trained personnel should attempt to clean-up any spills involving biological agents.

Laboratories must develop procedures for dealing with spills and must make appropriate spill response equipment and materials available. A basic spill kit could include a concentrated disinfectant (chlorine bleach or Wescodyne), paper towels, absorbent pads, sponges, rubber or latex gloves, forceps for broken glass and an autoclavable container. The Environmental Management Department is available to assist with assembling the kits.

The National Institute of Health Guidelines recommends 2% aqueous Wescodyne as a decontaminant for biological safety cabinets and 5% for a spill outside a cabinet.  These concentrations have been found effective for most common biological contaminants. However, Wescodyne (10% v/v) in 50% ethanol (w/w), originally recommended for hand washing, should be considered for use in biohazard situations involving poliovirus and bovine serum albumin, where Wescodyne alone was found to be ineffective.  For information regarding the effectiveness of Wescodyne on hepatitis B or SV40 viruses see the National Center for Biological Information (NCBI) website.

A homemade solution of bleach and water may also be used. Since a solution of bleach and water loses its strength quickly, it should be mixed fresh before each clean-up to make sure it is effective.

The recipe for Bleach Disinfecting Solution is nine (9) parts cool water to one (1) part household bleach.  Add the household bleach to the water.  Gently mix the solution.

Spill Response involving biological agents

Spill in a Biological Safety Cabinet

  • Leave the cabinet turned on.
  • Wearing gloves and laboratory coat, spray or wipe cabinet walls, work surfaces and equipment with the selected disinfectant.
  • Notify others in the area and contact Dispatch at 6-5509.
  • If necessary, flood work surface, drain pans and catch basins below the work surface with disinfectant. Allow at least 20 minutes contact time.
  • Soak up the disinfectant and drain the catch basin below the work surface with disinfectant. Allow at least 20 minutes contact time.
  • Autoclave all clean-up materials and protective clothing. Wash hands and exposed skin areas with disinfectant.
  • If the spill overflows into the interior of the cabinet, more extensive decontamination of the cabinet may be necessary.
  • Contact Environmental Management (6-8334) for the removal and disposal of accumulated bio-hazardous wastes.

Spill in an Open Laboratory

  • Notify others in the area and contact Dispatch at 6-5509.
  • Remove any contaminated clothing and wash exposed skin with disinfectant.
  • Wearing gloves, lab coat and safety glasses, cover the spill with paper towels, pour concentrated disinfectant around spill allowing it to mix with the spill. Allow at least 20 minutes contact time.
  • Inform supervisor. Wait at least 30 minutes before reentering the laboratory to allow dissipation of aerosols created by the spill. During this time review cleanup procedures and assemble material.
  • Don protective clothing (long sleeved gown, gloves, and shoe covers). Depending on the nature of the spill, it may be advisable to wear a respirator with high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) cartridges.
  • Carefully lay disinfectant-soaked towels over the spill and pour disinfectant around the spill. To minimize aerosolization, do not pour disinfectant directly onto the spill. Use more concentrated disinfectant if the volume of material will significantly dilute the disinfectant.
  • Allow 30 minutes contact time.
  • Use forceps to place sharp objects into a sharps container. Wipe surrounding surfaces with disinfectant to cover all splash areas. Wipe flat surfaces to remove any aerosol which may have settled out on those surfaces.
  • Place all contaminated materials, including protective clothing, into a biohazard bag and autoclave.
  • Wash hands and exposed skin areas.
  • Contact Environmental Management (6-8334) for the removal and disposal of accumulated bio-hazardous wastes.

Spill of Biohazardous Radioactive Material (I-125)

A spill involving material which is both a biohazard and radioactive requires recovery procedures different from those appropriate for radiation emitters alone. Recovery from a spill requires consideration of the types or radionuclide, pathogenicity of the microorganism or its components, the chemical composition and volume of the spill. Spills involving I-125 present minimal external hazard. Good aseptic techniques will prevent internal radiation exposure to these nuclides and prevent personnel contamination with either the pathogen or the radioactive material. Sterilization procedures involving radioisotopes must be approved in advance through the Radiation Safety Officer. 

When a spill occurs:

  • Notify others in the room and contact Dispatch at 6-5509. Avoid inhaling airborne material and quickly evacuate the area. Close the door and post a warning sign.
  • Remove contaminated clothing turning exposed side in upon itself. Place in a biohazard bag labeled with a radioactive material sticker.
  • Thoroughly wash all exposed skin with disinfectant. Rinse for three minutes, dry and monitor for residual radioactive contamination. If radioactive contamination remains, repeat the disinfection and decontamination procedure. Do not use harsh or abrasive cleansers on skin.
  • Inform the laboratory supervisor, notify the Radiation Safety Officer (RSO) and monitor all potentially exposed personnel for radioactive contamination. Wait at least 30 minutes before re-entering the laboratory to allow dissipation of aerosols created by the spill. During this time review cleanup procedures and assemble decontamination equipment.
  • Depending on the severity and virulence of the spill, dress in protective clothing (long sleeved gown, gloves, and shoe covers). It may be advisable to wear a respirator with high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) cartridges. However, use of respirators requires knowledge of their application and appropriate fitting before beginning recovery procedures.
  • Carefully lay disinfectant-soaked towels over the spill and pour disinfectant around the spill. To minimize aerosolization, do not pour disinfectant directly onto the spill. Use more concentrated disinfectant if the volume of material will significantly dilute the disinfectant.
  • Allow 30 minutes contact time.
  • Use forceps to place sharp objects into a sharps container. Wipe surrounding surfaces with disinfectant to cover all splash areas. Wipe flat surfaces to remove any aerosol which may have settled out on those surfaces.
  • Place all contaminated materials, including protective clothing, into a disposable plastic container lined with a heavy plastic bag labeled with radioactive materials warning tape. Do not autoclave without approval from the RSO. If it cannot be autoclaved, add additional disinfectant to ensure decontamination of all materials.
  • Following recovery efforts, thoroughly wash all exposed skin with disinfectant. Rinse for three minutes, dry and monitor for residual radioactive contamination. If radioactive contamination remains, repeat the disinfection and decontamination procedure. Do not use harsh or abrasive cleansers on skin.
  • Allow time for thorough drying of all disinfected surfaces and then monitor the spill area for residual radioactive contamination. The presence of radioactivity on surfaces warrants repeated disinfection and decontamination efforts.
Disposal

Infectious waste is regulated by the Missouri State Health Department. The key requirements with regard to infectious waste are proper labeling with subsequent disposal in a safe manner. For waste that has not been decontaminated, acceptable disposal procedures may include incineration, burial at an infectious waste landfill, or in some cases discharge into the sanitary sewer system. The Environmental Management Department will arrange for disposal of bagged and labeled biohazardous waste.

Waste which has been autoclaved can be disposed of with regular garbage only if it is obviously marked "autoclaved" and all biohazard labeling has been defaced. Contact the Director of Environmental Management (6-8334) for specific instructions.

Body Fluids

Body fluids, including blood, feces, and vomit, are all considered potentially contaminated with bloodborne pathogens and germs.  Therefore, spills of these fluids on hard surfaces such as floors and sidewalks should be cleaned up and the contaminated surfaces disinfected immediately.  When the spill is on carpeting, care must be taken to mix the bleach solution exactly or to use an alternative disinfectant to prevent permanent damage to the carpet appearance. (Strong bleach solutions can remove the carpet dye).

If there has been a release of blood or other bodily fluids, persons must take precautions to prevent contact with these materials.  Special precautions must be taken during clean-up activities where broken glass or other sharps are involved. Only trained personnel will be allowed to assist in the clean-up of any spills involving blood and broken glass.

If the area of the spill is greater than 36-inch diameter, if sharp objects such as glass, and/or if chemicals are involved or mixed with the fluids, immediately contact Missouri State Safety & Transportation Department at 6-5509.  In most cases, complex or larger spills will be cleaned up by a contractor to prevent exposure to university students, faculty, or staff.

If the area of the spill is less than 36-inch diameter, and if only a small amount or no glass is involved, and if no chemicals are involved, use a bleach disinfecting solution.

One of the most commonly used chemicals for disinfection is a homemade solution of household bleach and water.  Since a solution of bleach and water loses its strength quickly it should be mixed fresh before each clean-up to make sure it is effective.

The Recipe for Bleach Disinfecting Solution is nine (9) parts cool water to one (1) part household bleach.  Add the household bleach to the water.  Gently mix the solution.

Clean-up Procedure Using Bleach Solution
  • Block off the area of the spill from patrons until clean-up and disinfection is complete.
  • Put on two pair of disposable latex gloves to prevent contamination of hands.
  • Spray the item or spilled material with a disinfectant prior to cleaning it up to kill bacteria and reduce chance of exposure.
  • If sharp objects or glass are involved, a broom and dust pan must be used.  Do not pick up sharps/glass with your hands.  Wipe up the spill using paper towels or absorbent material and place in a plastic garbage bag.  For large amounts of blood or fluids on hard surfaces, a wet vac can be used to clean up the spill.  The wet vac must then be properly decontaminated using approved disinfectants.
  • Gently pour bleach solution onto all contaminated areas of the surface.
  • Let the bleach solution remain on the contaminated area for 20 minutes.
  • Wipe up the remaining bleach solution.
  • Liquids collected in a container, such as laboratory waste, may be disposed of in the sanitary sewer and should be flushed with an appropriate amount of water to make certain it does not accumulate in the drains or traps.
  • All non-disposable cleaning materials used such as mops and scrub brushes should be disinfected by saturating with bleach solution and air dried.
  • Remove the first set of gloves by gripping the tops first and pulling them inside out.  Then remove the second set in the same manner without touching the skin.  Place the gloves in plastic garbage bag with all soiled cleaning materials.
  • Double-bag and securely tie-up plastic garbage bags and discard.
  • Thoroughly wash hands with a disinfectant or antibacterial soap and water or a hand sanitizer such as Purell.
Other Disinfectants

These disinfectants are effective when used according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Hazardous Waste/Hazardous Materials Spills

The Director of Environmental Management will respond to a wide variety of hazardous materials incidents as described below.  For those incidents exceeding the capabilities of the Environmental Management Department, outside assistance will be requested.  Explosive or incendiary devices are not included in this plan and require law enforcement, fire department, or other specialized assistance to respond to these situations.  Public Safety Officers will assume incident command at the scene with the assistance of the Director of Environmental Management.

All personnel working with hazardous materials in the various departments on campus must be aware of the hazards and properties of the material, and the risks in using or storing the material, and must have operational procedures and equipment in place for handling small accidental releases. The Director of Environmental Management is available for assistance in preparing procedures for the various departments.

For the purposes of this contingency plan, chemical spills are divided into two categories:  Small spills and complicated spills. 

Small spills:
  • This includes a spill where the major dimension is less than 2 feet in diameter, involving a known material that is not considered highly toxic.  These spills are confined and present minimal hazards.  They can generally be cleaned up within the department by those involved in the spill or first observing it. 
  • Care should be taken to use appropriate Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) when necessary to prevent burns to skin or damage to clothing.  In most cases, the spilled material can be neutralized or absorbed with available absorbents.

    When responding to spills it is important to prevent inhalation of fumes that may be toxic or have harmful health effects.  When in doubt, the Director of Environmental Management should be contacted for guidance or assistance. 
  • Proper respiratory wear should be used for organics and fuming acids.
  • If unsure what to do, those involved in or discovering the spill should evacuate the room to prevent exposure, exercising the greatest amount of care to prevent health risks. 

    Portable spill kits have been provided in most of the chemistry and biology labs and in the Art Annex.  The kits contain absorbent material, nitrile gloves, safety glasses, a small broom and dust pan, and a plastic bag and/or plastic bucket in which to place the clean-up material. 
  • The Environmental Management Department should be contacted to remove and prepare the spill clean-up material for disposal.
  • Remember, if the spilled material is hazardous, it must be treated as a hazardous waste after it has been cleaned up. (See response procedures below.) 
Complicated Spills:
  • “Complicated” spills are generally spills where the major dimension exceeds 2 feet and/or any "running" spill where the source of the spill has not been contained or flow has not been stopped. Also included are mercury spills of any size. 
  • If you answer "Yes" to any of the following questions, you have a Complicated Spill.
    • Is the identity of the chemical unknown?
    • Are multiple chemicals involved?
    • Are broken glass and body fluids involved?
    • Is the material highly toxic, highly corrosive, flammable or reactive?
    • Did the spill occur in a public space, such as a hallway, sidewalk or street?
    • Is the spill in danger of spreading to other parts of the building, such as through the ventilation system or into storm sewers?
    • Are you unsure about how to clean up this spill?
  • In response to a Complicated Spill, you should evacuate the area and preclude inadvertent intrusion until the situation is controlled and warn others in adjacent rooms or areas. 
  • Get help:

    Safety & Transportation Dispatch Communication Center, 6-5509
    Environmental Management, 6-8334 or 343-8550
    Call 911 if there is a fire, explosion, injury, or medical emergency

    • Identify yourself to the responding parties when they arrive so you can answer any questions they may have.
Preventing Further Accidents:

Only persons who have been trained for "initial response" by the Director of Environmental Management (DEM) should attempt to contain complicated spills.

For complicated spills and for instances where the emergency showers and eye wash stations are used, larger spill kits (white drums marked “Spill Kit”) have been placed on the first, third and fourth floors of Temple.  There are three kits located on the fourth floor.  They consist of absorbent booms and pads to be used to contain the spilled liquids or the water from the emergency showers and eye wash.  Personal protective equipment is also included in the kits.  Additional spill control equipment is located in the hazardous waste storage area of the Central Stores and Warehouse building and in Public Safety Officers’ vehicles. 

Faculty, staff, and students who are first on the scene in Temple Hall may choose to place the booms in position to prevent the spread of the water from the showers or eye wash stations.  If blood from wounds is involved, students and faculty should avoid contact with the liquids.  If in doubt, do not attempt to contain the material.  Caution must be taken to prevent additional persons from being exposed to spilled chemicals and/or blood.

For larger spills, the DEM will coordinate the clean-up and removal of the waste material.  If the spill cannot be safely contained, neutralized, or absorbed, the DEM will notify the Fire Department HAZMAT team.

Mercury

Spills of mercury, such as from broken mercury thermometers or chemistry lab wastes, must be reported immediately to the Director of Environmental Management.  Mercury is a hazardous and toxic material that can be absorbed through the skin upon contact. A spill of elemental mercury, such as with the breaking of a thermometer, may result in the release of harmful mercury vapors.  Environmental Management has a vacuum that is specifically designed to clean up mercury spills and eliminate the release of mercury vapors.  Only the aforementioned recovery system should be used in response to mercury spills involving more than a small thermometer.  For spills involving small thermometers, mercury spill kits are available in the chemistry stock room at Temple Hall.

Sewage Spills/Overflows

For all outdoor sewage spills that occur on Missouri State University property, the area must be secured and immediate steps should be taken to contain the spill.  Dri-sorb, straw, sand, mulch, or other inert materials can be used to contain the flow and absorb the spilled material.  Efforts should be made to prevent the spilled material from entering storm drains. 

The Missouri State University faculty or staff member first observing the spill should immediately contact the Director of Environmental Management.  Spills that discharge from the University property and those occurring in city streets must be immediately reported to the municipal sanitary services department at 864-1923.  Work Management (6-8400) should also be contacted to correct or make arrangements for correcting the problem that created the spill. 

University personnel responding to the spill are only responsible for containing the spill.  They will normally not be expected to clean up the material if it is greater than 5 gallons.  

If feasible, liquid waste should be recovered and disposed of into the sanitary sewers as long as there are minimal solids.  Because the sewage is likely to contain pathogens and bacteria, however, protective gloves must be worn to prevent worker contact.  Liquid waste should be recovered and disposed into the sanitary sewers.  The spill area and contaminated absorbent material should be treated as a potential bio-hazardous waste and should be disinfected with a bleach solution in accordance with the guidance on Cleaning Up Body Fluids Spills as directed by the Center of Disease Control.  The contaminated absorbent material can then be bagged and placed into the dumpster. 

The Director of Environmental Management will be responsible for the following notifications:

  • Determine which regulatory agencies (if any) require notification of the release and make necessary reports.
  • Act as liaison with regulatory personnel who may respond to the scene.
  • Assist in procuring the service of a certified clean-up contractor when required in a major event.
Petroleum

Spills of any size on the campus of Missouri State University should be immediately contained whenever possible.  All spills must be promptly reported by calling Dispatch at 6-5509  Dispatch will notify the Director of Environmental Management and Public Safety who will respond and assess the incident.

According to Missouri law, any petroleum spill or product release of greater than 50 gallons must be reported to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR) (573-634-2436).  Further, federal law requires the reporting of any petroleum spill if it reaches or threatens any waterway.  The definition of waterway includes, among other things, storm sewers, groundwater, and road ditches that drain into other waterways.

Small spills should be controlled using absorbent materials available from Environmental Management and from Campus Safety vehicles.  If the absorbent is not immediately available, other materials such as sand, dirt, straw, or kitty litter may be used to contain the material. Additional response information can be found at DNR's Response to Small Fuel Spills webpage.

For larger spills and spills threatening waterways, including possible discharges into storm drains, absorbent booms should be used to contain the material.  Booms are available from Environmental Management and are also located in Campus Safety vehicles.  In the absence of booms, other absorbent material should be appropriately placed to contain the material and prevent entry into waterways or storm sewers.  A spill response company will then be contacted by the Environmental Management Department to remove the contained material and contaminated debris.

If the spill is major enough that it cannot be easily contained, Campus Safety Dispatch should immediately contact the Springfield Emergency Services (911) and the Director of Environmental Management.  The Director of Environmental Management will contact DNR and Springfield Public Works Department (864-1900).  The University has a spill response contractor on call for major spills.

Pesticides

Particular care must be taken when responding to pesticide spills.  It is imperative to use the proper protective equipment to fit the circumstances and the material spilled.  Respiratory protection may be required when responding to spills, especially in enclosed areas.  At a minimum, personnel must wear chemical resistant gloves and footwear.

Spilled pesticides must be contained at the original site of the spill if such activities can be done without exposing the employee to potentially toxic chemicals.  Efforts should be made to contain the spilled material using absorbent booms, pads or other absorbent material. 

Whenever possible, the pesticide must be prevented from entering storm sewers or waterways.  The spill should be covered using an absorbent material for liquids and a polyethylene or plastic tarpaulin for powders and granular materials.

NOTE: Use absorbent materials sparingly as they also must be disposed of as hazardous wastes. 

The Director of Environmental Management (836-8334) should be immediately contacted for assistance in containment, clean-up and disposal of the waste material.  For spills that cannot be easily contained by University personnel, the local emergency response personnel should be contacted (911).

Remember to report all spills to Safety & Transportation.

Upon containment of the spill: 

  • DETERMINE nature of incident: crash, drift, applicator, fieldworker, public, spill, odor; few or many victims
  • DETERMINE the hazards of pesticide(s) involved: review product labels and MSDS, contact Center for Disease Control – NCEH Health Line (1-888-232-4636), or visit the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS).
  • Fumigants and insecticides generally pose the greatest hazards.
  • DETERMINE WHETHER exposure occurred: interview, observation, sampling
  • EVALUATE the extent of exposure: Low, Medium or High?
  • Consider symptoms, degree of contact, length of contact
  • IF exposure occurred, decontaminate appropriately with soap and water, considering the hazard of the materials, extent of exposure, and personal privacy.
  • DO NOT DECONTAMINATE if NO exposure occurred.

Emergency Equipment

Spill Kits

Small spill kits containing absorbent material, baking soda for acid spills, gloves, a small broom and dust pan, and a plastic bag are located in most of the chemistry laboratories.  Most of these are just inside the entry door to the labs, under or near the eye wash station.  There are also small spill kits in Safety & Transportation Department vehicles. 

Large spill kits are provided on the top 3 floors of Temple with 3 kits available on the fourth floor.  The kits are in the hallways at each end of the fourth floor.  The third floor kit is located in room 337 and the second floor kit is located in room 239.  The large kits contain absorbent booms and pads in addition to the protective gear (gloves, booties, and safety glasses).  The large kits are to be utilized whenever the showers or eyewash stations are employed or when there are large volume spills that can be responded to without chemical exposure to those responding.

Large bags of absorbent material are located in the Central Stores and Warehouse building on the west end of the south aisle.  There is a box containing the bags of absorbents, some of which do not absorb water and are for petroleum products only.  Shovels and brooms may be used to clean up the absorbent material.

Tools and Other Equipment

Tools such as shovels and brooms are available in the Grounds Department at the south end of the Central Stores and Warehouse Building.  Environmental Management has 3 and 5-gallon buckets and 30 and 55-gallon drums available for collecting clean-up materials and debris; these are stored in the south central portion of the Central Stores and Warehouse building.  There is also a canister style vacuum sweeper available through the Environmental Management Department for use in removing spilled liquids and solid spill clean-up debris.

Site Control and Responsibilities

Incident Commander (IC)

The first Public Safety Officer on site will normally assume the role of IC and direct emergency response operations.  The Director of Environmental Management will assist when hazardous wastes or materials are involved.  IC responsibilities may be transferred to the Springfield Fire Department or other more highly trained individuals who are on-site when it is appropriate.

Upon determining the incident level, the IC will take reasonable measures necessary to ensure that the incident is appropriately contained and responded to.  These measures could include stopping operations, evacuating work areas or buildings, shutting down air handling systems, protecting nearby storm sewers and containing released wastes.  If hazardous wastes or hazardous materials are involved, the IC will confer with the Director of Environmental Management or designee on securing the site and containment of the spill.

When necessary, the IC will direct the Public Safety Officers to initiate evacuation of an isolated area or building.

The IC and/or Director of Environmental Management may notify and request assistance from outside public and private emergency responders as necessary.  An emergency response contractor and back-up responder are on contract. 

Responsibilities

Public Safety Officers will be responsible for the following:

  1. Controlling access to the spill site.
  2. Maintaining communications with campus personnel such as custodial, mechanical, and grounds staff.
  3. Maintaining communications with local emergency agencies when their involvement is necessary.
  4. Assisting with evacuation of the site if evacuation is deemed necessary.

Director of Environmental Management will be responsible for the following:

  1. Conducting a site hazard assessment to determine:
    1. What spilled?
    2. How much?
    3. Hazards of material.
    4. The potential for environmental contamination.
  2. Determining which type of the following response or clean-up will be needed.
    1. Missouri State University staff
    2. Contractor response
    3. Springfield Fire Department
    4. MDNR Emergency Response Team
  3. Relaying hazard assessment information to responding unit(s).
  4. Assuring that spilled residues and wastes are cleaned up and disposed of in accordance with federal and state regulations. This includes obtaining disposal approvals and preparing for shipments off-site.
  5. Filing all written reports required by regulatory agencies.
  6. Assuring that a supply of spill response materials is available for use by Physical Plant personnel and Public Safety Officers.  Materials for clean-up and disposal are located in the Environmental Management vehicle, in Public Safety Officer’s vehicles and in the hazardous waste storage area. Materials include: Spill pillows, absorbent socks, overpacks, containers, personal protective equipment, neutralizing agents, etc.

Director of Environmental Management and Public Safety Officers will:

  1. Relinquish control of the incident to the Springfield Fire Department HAZMAT team on arrival, but maintain authority over University personnel.
  2. Ensure that all work performed by personnel is done in a safe and responsible manner.
  3. Establish a perimeter around the spill zone.
  4. Establish roadblocks as necessary to prevent vehicular and foot traffic into the spill zone.
  5. In coordination with the on-the-scene commander, give the all-clear signal when all emergency conditions have been addressed.

All Hazardous Materials responses will be considered "high risk" until confirmed otherwise.

Clean-Up and Disposal

All emergency operations related to hazardous substances shall be conducted in accordance with the following incident management procedure.  In some cases, complicated spills will require the services of an outside clean-up contractor to protect the health and safety of campus personnel.  At the point when that is determined, Missouri State University personnel should discontinue with these procedures, isolate the area, and deny entry.

  1. Response personnel will proceed with caution.
  2. Isolate area and if appropriate, set up a hazard zone and deny entry.
  3. Avoid contact with spilled product.
  4. Identify material(s).
  5. Evaluate hazards and risks.
  6. Eliminate ignition sources.
  7. Do not exceed level of skill and training when considering containment and clean-up. 
  8. Utilize the “buddy system” if performing containment and/or clean-up.
  9. Choose protective clothing/equipment.
  10. Coordinate Information/resources.
  11. Take into account -- while planning the response -- interaction of incompatible materials, volatility, and flammable nature of the constituents involved.
  12. Control and confine product/material.
  13. Prevent liquid from entering drains, sewers, and confined spaces by placement of booms and/or absorbent material.
  14. Clean up spilled product.
  15. Decontaminate.
  16. Return area to service.
  17. Terminate (debrief/document/critique).

Incident Termination

The Director of Safety & Transportation and Director of Environmental Management, or their designees, shall determine when an emergency incident is over.  This decision may be based on input from the Incident Commander and/or outside emergency responders.  When determining whether an emergency has ended, the director(s)/designee(s) will consider:

  1. Remaining potential threat to human health and the environment.
  2. Whether the incident has ceased or is under control.
  3. Whether it is safe for workers to enter evacuated areas.
  4. Clean-up of site.

Decontamination

When necessary, the Environmental Management Department or an outside contractor will provide decontamination, depending upon the chemicals involved, materials contaminated, and the extent of contamination.  Decontamination procedures and equipment will be paid for as necessary with University funds.

After-Action Review

Within 72 hours following termination of the incident, the Associate Vice President for Administrative Services, Director of Safety & Transportation, Safety Administrator and Director of Environmental Management will meet to assess the response, issues and potential corrective action.

Plan Amendments

This plan will be reviewed and amended by the Director of Environmental Management whenever:

  1.  It fails in an emergency;
  2. Some other circumstance significantly increases the potential for releases of hazardous materials or changes the response necessary in an emergency;
  3. Regular exercises or drills suggest amendment is necessary; or
  4. The Associate Vice President for Administrative Services, the Director of Safety & Transportation or the Director of Environmental Management deem a change to be necessary.

Training

Incident response personnel are required, at a minimum, to complete the 4-hour Spill and Hazard Communication training and an annual refresher as provided by the Director of Environmental Management.  They must also receive training to familiarize them on department equipment and campus Emergency Response Plan procedures.

Arrangements with Local Emergency Agencies

Arrangements have been made with the Springfield Fire Department and Springfield Police Department, the Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC), the Greene County Health Department, and with the Emergency Services Department of Mercy Hospital.  Representatives were advised of the locations and types of waste materials that might be encountered during an incident on-campus.  Each of the agencies has agreed to participate in any emergency incidents and was sent a letter confirming the conversations.  Included with the letters were maps showing the locations of the majority of the hazardous wastes.  Copies of the letters and accompanying information are maintained in the Environmental Management Department files.

Emergency Coordinators

Primary Emergency Coordinator
David Vaughan
PhoneNumber
office: 836-8334
cell: 343-8550
home: 877-9769
Alternate Emergency Coordinator
Gary Snavely
PhoneNumber
office: 836-4441
cell: 425-0255
home: 883-3562

Notification Procedures

Upon notification of a chemical release, Missouri State University Safety & Transportation will:

  1. Ascertain category/size of spill and response actions taken if any.  If this is a complicated spill or the caller is unable to respond, notify Missouri State University Public Safety Officers and the Director of Safety & Transportation.  If spill has been remediated, forward information to the Director of Environmental Management.
  2. Alert the Director of Environmental Management or designee of the hazardous condition. (See Emergency Coordinator contact list)
  3. If appropriate, advise the caller to secure the area, evacuate personnel and meet responders outside (If a chemical release has occurred outside, advise personnel to move upwind of the spill location.)
  4. If the report includes sign of flames or serious injury, request Springfield Fire Department assistance.

If the initial call was made to Safety & Transportation or the Environmental Management Department, that office should notify the Safety & Transportation Dispatch Communication Center.

For Trained Responders Only - Hazardous Substance Response Procedures

Per OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120

All emergency operations related to hazardous substances shall be conducted in accordance with the following incident management procedure. (In some cases, complicated spills will require the services of an outside clean-up contractor to protect the health and safety of campus personnel.  At the point when that is determined, Missouri State University personnel should discontinue with these procedures, isolate the area, and deny entry.  The outside contractor, listed in Attachment E, should then be contacted.)

  1. Response personnel will proceed with caution.
  2. Isolate area and if appropriate, set up a hazard zone and deny entry.
  3. Avoid contact with spilled product.
  4. Identify material(s).
  5. Evaluate hazards and risks.
  6. Eliminate ignition sources.
  7. Do not exceed level of skill and training when considering containment and clean-up.
  8. Utilize the "buddy system" if performing containment and/or clean-up.
  9. Choose protective clothing/equipment.
  10. Coordinate Information/resources.
  11. Take into account -- while planning the response -- interaction of incompatible materials, volatility, and flammable nature of the constituents involved.
  12. Control and confine product/material.
  13. Prevent liquid from entering drains, sewers, and confined spaces by placement of booms and/or absorbent material.
  14. Clean up spilled product.
  15. Decontaminate.
  16. Return area to service.
  17. Terminate (debrief/document/critique).