Missouri State University

Modern & Classical Languages (MCL)Department of Modern and Classical Languages

Study Away to Greece

Study Away to Greece

Course Name: Ancient Athens and Aigina: Cult Centers and Coastal Connections

Course Number: MCL 550

Credit Hours: 3 undergraduate

Program Highlights:

MCL 550 fits all three "focus areas" of the Global Studies program, and can be counted for MCL degrees in all areas, with department head approval.

Program Fee: $1,785

Program Fee Includes: Ground transportation in Greece, lodging, some meals, museum entrance fees, tour guides, Study Away student fee, basic medical insurance; separated costs not available.

Program Fee Excludes: Passport, round trip airfare, some meals, incidentals/misc personal expenses, and souvenirs. $612 MSU tuition for 3 hours of undergraduate credit. Both Missouri residents and non-residents pay the Mo. resident per-credit-hour tuition rate, per University policy.

Applications are due by March 3, 2014. A nonrefundable deposit of $267.75 will be billed to your student account. Please see Application & Payment Procedures for MSU and Visiting Students.

Scholarship Eligibility & Financial Aid

Students may apply for the College of Arts and Letters Study Away scholarship. Applications are due to the Study Away office by April 11, 2014. Please see the scholarship page on the Study Away website. Additionally, students who receive financial aid may apply aid to this program. Contact the Office of Financial Aid at 836-5262 for more information.

Course Overview

In this course students will study and visit three of the key sites in an ancient network of religious centers that shaped the culture of ancient Greece. In the 5th century BC, the new democracy at Athens led an alliance of Greek states against the Persian invasion and then translated that leadership into a broader hegemony, political and cultural. The religious centers in Athens, devoted to the titular goddess Athena and other local figures, exploited their relationship with Dionysos, Demeter, and the Mystery center at Eleusis, in partnership with financial interests of the empire.

Specific Course Objectives

  • To explore the developments in ancient culture represented in the archaeological remains of Attica and Aigina, focusing on the way these communities exploited their access to the Aegean to transform their local shrines (devoted to the goddesses Athena, Aphaia, and Demeter) into pan-Hellenic cult centers.
  • To assess those cultural developments in the context of changes, political and economic, that shaped the classical world (esp. the Persian Wars and the emergence of Athens, Aigina's ancient rival).
  • To draw perspective on those ancient adaptations from the ongoing economic difficulties in Greece, in which these ancient tourist sites remain important commercial centers.

Course Outline & Schedule

In this course students will study and visit three of the key sites in an ancient network of religious centers that shaped the culture of ancient Greece. In the 5th century BC, the new democracy at Athens led an alliance of Greek states against the Persian invasion and then translated that leadership into a broader hegemony, political and cultural. The religious centers in Athens, devoted to the titular goddess Athena and other local figures, exploited their relationship with Dionysos, Demeter, and the Mystery center at Eleusis, in partnership with financial interests of the empire.

Every year for centuries thousands of visitors came to Athens en route to these sites. In the spring they joined in the worship of Dionysos and the dramatic festival in his honor: this was the birth of tragedy and comedy in western tradition. In mid summer visitors came to honor Athena on her birthday (some with offerings required by treaty), along with the great procession of Athenian citizens commemorated on the Parthenon frieze. But most important in this regard was the Athenian connection with Eleusis, a harbor town about a day’s walk (now a 30 minute bus ride) along the coast to the west. There in the autumn of each year ceremonies in honor of “the Mother and Daughter,” Demeter and Persephone, represent the most vital faith of a vast constituency, cherished beliefs about death and the afterlife. Athens won control of Eleusis by the 600s BC and gradually incorporated that cult into the Athenian fabric of religion, commerce, and political influence.

The nearby island of Aigina was an ancient rival until Athens took control in the aftermath of the Persian Wars. Aigina was the legendary birthplace of a clan that dominated much of the Trojan-War saga, including figures of cult at Athens. And that mythic importance was celebrated on the exquisite temple of Aphaia, the ‘Unseen’, who was once a rival of Athena herself but eventually adopted her as a more visible champion. That relationship was portrayed on the decorative sculptures of Aphaia’s temple, which reflect the new post-war allegiance, with Athena triumphant at the center.

STUDY TOUR

Itinerary subject to change.

May 20-23, 2014: Visit Acropolis, Agora, and Eleusis.

May 24-30, 2014: In Aigina, with visits to the temple of Aphaia, and other archaeological sites, and hiking to explore the landscape and evolving community.

May 31 - June 2, 2014: In Athens, with excursion to Sounion and visit to the National Archaeological Museum.

POST-TRAVEL

Focus group regarding program evaluation and recommendations, reflection on the experience.

Course Credit & Requirements

  • Basic-training: exercises and quizzes (online open-book) on essential features of landscape and language.
  • Presentation or comparable Creative Project: May 29-30. Students working in groups of 2 or 3 prepare and present an overview of the key sites (with illustrations), in the form of a ‘mental map’ of an ancient pilgrim’s journey to the cult centers (or other format incorporating recent experience).
  • Journal of participation showing reflection on the day’s events and cross-cultural challenges, due within a week after return.

Required Text: Readings and other materials to be provided online.

Recommended: R. Rhodes, Architecture and Meaning on the Athenian Acropolis, Cambridge, 1995.

Application & Payment Procedures

Missouri State University students and others who are approved by a Program Director may apply. Instructions are included on the program application.

MSU Students: A non-refundable deposit of $267.75 will be billed to your University account upon application (deadline March 3, 2014). You will receive a second billing on April 4, 2014 and a final billing on May 2, 2014, for the balance of the program fee ($1,517.25). MSU course tuition ($612) will be billed to your University account and is due according to the university payment plan.

Visiting Students: A non-refundable deposit of $267.75 (check or money order) must accompany your application (deadline March 3, 2014). A check or money order for the balance of the program fee ($1,517.25) and MSU course tuition ($612) will be due by May 2, 2014.

IN ORDER TO ENSURE PARTICIPATION IN THIS STUDY AWAY PROGRAM, THE ENTIRE AMOUNT OF THE PROGRAM FEE MUST BE RECEIVED BY MAY 12, 2014. PAYMENT CAN BE MADE ONLINE OR AT THE BURSAR’S OFFICE. Estimated program fees are based on rates in effect on the publication date of this flyer and may be subject to change. Program participants agree to a potential increase of up to 10% if rates increase before or during travel.

Cancellation & Refund Policies

  • Students who withdraw prior to April 11, 2014 will receive a refund of fees paid, less the $267.75 deposit and any non-refundable purchases made on his/her behalf.
  • If a student is forced to withdraw after April 11, 2014 for a bona fide medical reason, s/he will receive a refund of fees paid, less the $267.75 deposit and expenses. A certificate of incapacitating illness or injury from a licensed physician is required.
  • Students withdrawing voluntarily after April 11, 2014, or withdrawing due to medical reasons not protected under the fees refund policy, receive no refund.
  • Once the program has started, no refunds will be issued under any circumstances.
  • All notifications of withdrawal must be made in writing and sent to the Program Director and Director of Study Away Programs at the Study Away Office, Jim D. Morris Center, Suite 403. Non-payment of fees does not guarantee automatic withdrawal.

Interested in going?

Contact either of the program directors, Department of Modern & Classical Languages:

Pre-travel Class Meetings:
TBA

Application Due:
March 3, 2014

Depart for Greece:
May 19, 2014

Depart for Springfield:
June 3, 2014

Post-Travel Meeting:
TBA

Participants should be in good physical condition and ready for long hikes on rugged terrain.

Greece Study Away Program Brochure

Dr. Edwin M. Carawan

Teaching: Classical Mythology, Greek Civilization, Elementary Ancient Greek I and II

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J. Dane Wallace

Teaching: History of the New Testament Period, Hero and Quest, Classical Mythology, First Year Programs

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