Job Family 1 Job Evaluation Plan

MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES
JOB EVALUATION MANUAL
5/31/2007
 
Revised 6/11/07
 6/14/07, added Work Impact, revised Physical Effort
11/7/07, added points to degree levels
 
This guide describes the point-factor job evaluation system used to evaluate administrative support, clerical, financial services, student services, library, and other paraprofessional jobs at Missouri State University.
 
JOB FAMILY 1
Administrative Support and Clerical Employees, Financial and Student Services Employees, Library, and other Paraprofessional Employees
Knowledge Equivalencies Chart
Factor Ia: Educational Requirements of the Job
Factor Ib: Experience Requirements
Factor II: Complexity and Technical Mastery
Factor III: Responsibility for the Work of Others
Factor IV: Guidelines
Factor V: Contacts
Factor VI: Work Impact
Factor VII: Physical Effort and Work Environment
Job Evaluation Worksheet
This job evaluation plan incorporates some compensable factors, factor definitions, degree level descriptions, and other language included in and/or derived from the Department of Labor’s Guide for Evaluating Your Firm’s Jobs and Pay and the Office of Personnel Management’s Introduction to Position Classification Standards. Complete citations can be found below:

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2003). National compensation survey: Guide for evaluating your firm’s jobs and pay (DOL Publication).             Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

U.S. Office of Personnel Management. (1995). Introduction to the position classification standards (Publication No. TS-134). Washington,     D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

 
Job Family 1: Knowledge Equivalencies Chart
The level of knowledge required in order to adequately perform the job. Knowledge is acquired through a combination of formal training and related job experience. This factor defines knowledge based on the level and specificity of the educational requirements of the position, and the amount of relevant experience required by the job. This is a factor with 13 scale points developed through the use of a grid incorporating both educational requirements for the job and general work experience. This equivalencies grid approach explicitly recognizes that for many jobs experience and education can act as substitutes for each other.
 
Specific job requirements may limit the application of this chart. For example, a specific job might require a minimum of five years of experience and not allow an educational equivalent. Another job might require a specific college degree and not allow an experience equivalent. Both jobs would be at factor level 6 regardless whether or not the equivalency was allowed. In other words, this chart allows equivalencies to exist but does not require them for all jobs where job requirements do not make it possible.
 
   
Factor Levels for Educational and Experience Requirements of the Job
 
Ia. Educational
Requirements
of the Job
 
Ib. Experience Requirements for the Job
 
1. None
 
2. One
year
 
3. Two
years
 
4. Three
years
 
5. Four
years
 
6. Five
years
 
7. Six
years plus
 

1. Primary - HS diploma or equiv.

 
1
200 pts
 
2
260 pts
 
3
360 pts
 
4
500 pts
 
5
680 pts
 
6
900 pts
 
7
1160 pts
 
2. Primary Voc.

HS + 30 hrs

 
2
260 pts
 
3
360 pts
 
4
500 pts
 
5
680 pts
 
6
900 pts
 
7
1160 pts
 
8
1460 pts
 
3. Advanced Voc.

HS + 30-60

 
3
360 pts
 
4
500 pts
 
5
680 pts
 
6
900 pts
 
7
1160 pts
 
8
1460 pts
 
9
1800 pts
 
4. Specialized

Assoc. Deg. (60+)

 
4
500 pts
 
5
680 pts
 
6
900 pts
 
7
1160 pts
 
8
1460 pts
 
9
1800 pts
 
10
2180 pts
 
5. Primary Prof.

NS Coll. Deg.

 
5
680 pts
 
6
900 pts
 
7
1160 pts
 
8
1460 pts
 
9
1800 pts
 
10
2180 pts
 
11
2600 pts
 
6. Professional

Prof. Deg.

 
6
900 pts
 
7
1160 pts
 
8
1460 pts
 
9
1800 pts
 
10
2180 pts
 
11
2600 pts
 
12
3060 pts
 
7. Advanced Prof.

Masters Deg.

 
7
1160 pts
 
8
1460 pts
 
9
1800 pts
 
10
2180 pts
 
11
2600 pts
 
12
3060 pts
 
13
3560 pts

Job Family 1, Factor Ia: Educational Requirements of the Job

Job knowledge including formal knowledge based on the educational and vocational training required, including secondary, vocational, and college courses necessary in order to perform the job at an acceptable level, and/or knowledge of specific professional or technical areas acquired through specific work experience.

1. Primary. A primary level of knowledge including basic literacy and mathematical knowledge equivalent to that acquired through possessing a high school diploma or the equivalent.
 
2. Primary Vocational. A level of knowledge beyond that of a high school diploma or its equivalent that would include one or more of the following:
  • Up to one year (30 credit hours) of technical training, certification, and/or vocational classes or course work in a specialized area.
  • Knowledge of a specific professional or technical area such as accounting, bookkeeping, purchasing, information technology, complex database or record keeping, library science, and/or similar areas, that could be acquired through one to two years of job experience.
  • Basic knowledge in supervising, training, and reviewing the work of others such as could be acquired through one to two years of job experience.
3. Advanced Vocational. A level of knowledge beyond that of high school diploma or its equivalent that would include one or more of the following:
  • More than one year and up to two years (more than 30 but less than 60 credit hours) of college in specific and/or specialized courses and/or equivalent vocational training.
  • Knowledge of a specific professional or technical area such as accounting, bookkeeping, purchasing, information technology, complex database or record keeping, library science, and/or similar areas that could be acquired through at least two years of job experience.
  • Knowledge of supervision and basic supervisory skills as demonstrated by a specific job requirement for limited but direct supervisory experience.

4. Specialized. A level of knowledge beyond that of high school diploma or its equivalent that would include one or more of the following:

  • An Associate’s degree, an equivalent vocational degree, or an equivalent level of training or specialized courses (60 credit hours or more).
  • Advanced knowledge of a specific professional or technical area such as accounting, bookkeeping, information technology, complex database or record keeping, library science, and/or similar areas that could be acquired through three or more years of job experience.
  • Considerable knowledge of supervision and evidence of supervisory skills as demonstrated by specific job requirements for significant supervisory experience.

5. Primary Professional. A level of knowledge requiring either a non-specific four-year college degree, or a degree in a non-technical field.

6. Professional. A level of knowledge requiring one or more of the following:

  • A college degree in a business or technical area (such as accounting, finance, computer science, engineering, management, marketing, etc.).
  • A four-year degree with specific classes in a specialized or technical area.
  • A Master’s Degree in an unspecified or non-technical area.

7. Advanced Professional. A level of knowledge requiring completion of a Master’s degree in a technical or professional field.

 
Job Family 1, Factor Ib: Experience Requirements
 
Knowledge based on the minimum amount of job-related experience that is necessary in order to perform the job at an acceptable level.

1. None. The job requires no previous work experience or a limited degree of experience which can be acquired in less than one year.

2. One Year. The job requires sufficient job knowledge to necessitate at least one year of experience performing similar or related duties.

3. Two Years. The job requires considerable knowledge to necessitate at least two years of experience performing similar or related duties.

4. Three Years. The job requires moderate job knowledge to necessitate three years of experience performing similar or related duties.

5. Four Years. The job requires moderately extensive job knowledge to necessitate four years of experience performing similar or related duties.

6. Five Years. The job requires extensive job knowledge to necessitate at least five years of experience performing similar or related duties.

7. Six Years Plus. The job requires extensive specialized job knowledge to necessitate six or more years of experience performing similar or related duties.

 

Job Family 1, Factor II: Complexity and Technical Mastery

Technical and specialized knowledge, skills, or abilities required by the job. This includes knowledge of specific procedures, steps, practices, concepts and techniques, and/or specialized knowledge of a professional discipline, and the required skill or ability to apply these procedures, practices, techniques, or disciplines. The specific requirements for the job may include:

A. Knowledge of computers and computer software, skill in operating computers, and proficiency with computer application software.

B. Ability to operate, maintain and/or troubleshoot office machines, audio/video, and similar equipment.

C. Knowledge of procedures and processes used to maintain files and/or records, and skill in storing, retrieving, disseminating, and otherwise managing files and records.

D. Knowledge of the specific practices and principles of a professional discipline such as accounting, library science, financial management, or other discipline, and the ability to apply those practices and principles to the job.

E. Knowledge of complex University and/or unit processes and practices and/or the ability to administer or manage programs, projects, or individuals.

F. Skill in oral and written interpersonal and intergroup communications and conflict resolution.

The examples following each factor level are illustrative of the level of complexity and technical mastery at that level. The job need not require the performance of all the specific tasks appearing in the examples to be rated at that level. Instead, the examples should be used as anchors with which to compare the relative requirements of each job’s specific job tasks. To rate jobs on this factor use the tasks as a guide, but consider the complexity of the job and the technical mastery it requires as a whole.

The factor level descriptions follow:

1. 100 points: Few specific technical or specialized skills are required. Basic skills in oral communication, written communication, and mathematics, and the basic ability to operate a computer may be required. Work requires common abilities including ordinary interpersonal communication skills, general office skills, the ability to follow instructions, and the ability to exercise discretion in handling departmental or University policies. Work involves basic processes and may involve the use of common office machines. Skills are typically learned on-the-job, and job competence can be reached within several days to several weeks. Specific knowledge, skills, and abilities required for this level may include one or more of the following:

  • Keyboarding ability
  • Ability to complete and prepare forms and documents
  • Ability to meet and greet individuals and provide directions
  • Ability to maintain records and input data
  • Ability to operate common office machines
  • Ability to manage departmental funds

2. 130 points: Skill in oral and written communication, the ability to make basic mathematical calculations, the ability to understand and follow instructions, knowledge of office or other work procedures, and the ability to work independently, are required. Job proficiency is usually achieved within a few weeks to a few months.

The job skill requirements at this level typically allow the incumbent to serve as the second administrative support position in a department and/or to work with less complex administrative or financial processes. Specific knowledge, skills, and abilities required for this level may include one or more of the following:

  • Skill in keyboarding
  • Knowledge of application software including word processing, spreadsheet, database management, and/or related software and the ability to use the software to complete assigned tasks
  • Ability to learn and use various systems or applications used within the University or department, such as desktop publishing and presentation software, web content management applications, and/or mainframe applications to complete assigned tasks
  • Ability to operate and troubleshoot standard office equipment
  • Ability to prepare and maintain paper and electronic files and records
  • Ability to support various business functions of the department including purchasing, inventory control, payroll, or other activities
  • Skill in interpersonal communications and the ability to provide reception and customer service and information about the departments’ services, programs or processes
  • Ability to update websites and databases
  • Ability to prepare and process mass mailings of materials
3. 220 points: The job requires considerable skill in oral and written communication, the ability to make basic mathematical calculations, the ability to understand and follow instructions, knowledge of moderately complex office or other work procedures, and the ability to work independently and coordinate a variety of activities and events. Achieving complete job proficiency may take several months to more than one year.

The job skill requirements at this level typically allow the incumbent to function as the lead or primary administrative support position in typical departments and/or to work with moderately complex administrative or financial processes. Specific skills required for this level include those skills listed at Level 2 plus one or more of the following:

  • Advanced computer literacy including advanced knowledge of specific computer functional software such as word processing, spreadsheets, and/or database management applications, graphic design and desktop publishing software and/or web design and maintenance applications, and/or mainframe applications
  • Skill in processing a large volume of purchases, verifying time records, billing for products or services, and maintaining financial records and accounts
  • Skill in coordinating department activities such as travel, class and/or event scheduling
  • Ability to coordinate and monitor the work of others
  • Knowledge of moderately complex University and/or unit practices and procedures and the ability to communicate to and assist others
  • Skill in providing customer service requiring an in-depth understanding of programs, processes, or services
  • Ability to administer varied or related processes or departmental services.
  • Knowledge of rules, regulations, and standards, and the ability to ensure compliance with established standards
  • Skill in coordinating various academic processes at the department or college level

4. 370 points: The job requires the general skills described in Level 3. In addition, work at this level requires specific professional skills and/or skills in managing a wide variety of complex processes beyond those of Level 3. Work at this level is more complex than that in Level 3 because of one or more of the following:

The levels of independent judgment and process complexity require more breadth and/or depth of skills to perform the complex processes required by the job.

Higher levels of difficulty or responsibility are involved.

The skills required at this level allow the incumbent to serve as a lead or primary administrative support position with responsibility for a wide variety of complex processes with limited supervision and/or perform diverse and complex data management processes requiring proficiency with specialized applications. These higher level skills may include:

  • Skills specific to a professional or technical area, or creative or artistic skill
  • Skill in maintaining complex inventory, filing, and/or record keeping systems including organizing, storing, retrieving, and disseminating information
  • Advanced skill involved in managing multiple financial and grant accounts with active and/or unusual purchasing activities, and/or in performing accounting procedures and reconciling multiple accounts which are relied on by the supervisor to make decisions
  • Skill involved in coordinating and organizing complex departmental activities including human resource activities and special events
  • Skill in determining the nature of a diverse variety of actions and events, translating those actions and events into complex database coding combinations designed to drive and coordinate various automated processes affecting all employees or all students, and organizing those processes to occur in coordination with the timing of related automated processes
  • Skill in administering programs, processes, or services with limited supervision
  • Skill in performing diverse and complex data management processes requiring an understanding of database structure and the information contained in the database
  • Skill in utilizing an in-depth knowledge of applicable University, state or federal regulations affecting programs or processes administered by the incumbent
  • Skill in planning and coordinating the implementation of policies at the college or cost center level
  • Skill in making administrative decisions on behalf of an executive within established guidelines or policies
  • Ability to manage projects or programs or handle day-to-day administrative responsibilities independently

5. 580 points: The job requires the general skills described in Level 3 and the higher level skills described in Level 4. In addition, work at this level requires specific professional knowledge and skills and/or skills in managing a wide variety of complex processes beyond those of Level 4, including advanced skill in oral and written communication.

Work at this level is more complex than that in Level 4 because the span of control, level of independent judgment required, consequences of actions, and/or organizational complexity necessitate more breadth and/or depth of skills to perform the complex processes required by the job. In addition, the work requires a higher level of understanding of University processes, programs, and projects and high levels of difficulty and complexity in decision making and administrative responsibilities. These higher level skills may include:

  • Skill in planning and coordinating the administrative details associated with implementing decisions and policies of a senior executive
  • Skill in communicating and ability to act as a liaison between University units by explaining and interpreting policies
  • Skill in exercising discretion and assuring confidentiality in handling sensitive and confidential issues, records, and files
  • Ability to schedule, plan, and/or coordinate high profile activities
  • Knowledge and ability to independently apply a body of professional knowledge to events, situations, and the work processed by the employee
  • Skill in planning and coordinating the implementation of policies and decisions at a major cost center level
  • Skill in independently managing programs and processes involving the exercise of independent judgment with matters of significance
  • Skill in supervising and leading projects involving coordination with subsidiary units
  • Skill in supervising and staffing frequently occurring events using a large pool of workers selected, hired, and trained by the incumbent
  • Ability to exercise a full range of office management responsibilities including financial and human resource responsibilities

 

Job Family 1, Factor III: Responsibility for the Work of Others

The type of supervision of others required by the job defined in terms of the type of supervision performed by the incumbent, the type of employee being supervised, and the proportion of time spent in supervisory work.

1. 0 points: No responsibility for work of others.

2. 30 points: Occasional responsibility to direct the work of one or more student workers and/or temporary or part-time workers. The requirement to supervise others is not a regular job duty, but may occur on an intermittent or irregular basis. The nature of the required supervision is largely confined to assigning work or tasks to others and does not include a full range of supervisory responsibilities.

3. 60 points: Supervision of one student or part-time worker or graduate assistant, where the nature of supervision is largely confined to scheduling and assigning tasks and reviewing completed work. The incumbent may provide input into the staffing and employee evaluation processes, but the final decisions are made by other supervisors. The incumbent does not perform a full range of supervisory responsibilities and spends relatively little time performing supervisory functions.

4.110 point: Some supervision and training of small numbers of student or part-time workers is required where the nature of supervision is largely confined to scheduling work and assigning tasks. Supervision at this level may also involve directing the work assignments of one or more permanent, full-time employees. Supervisory tasks may include providing input into hiring and employee evaluation processes, but the final decisions are made by other supervisors. The incumbent typically does not perform a full range of supervisory responsibilities and supervisory duties typically involve relatively little time during the work day. Characteristic of this level would be a departmental administrative assistant who directs the activities of two or three student workers, or an accounting specialist who, as a work team leader or working supervisor, schedules the activities of two part-time employees and a graduate assistant.

5. 180 points: Supervision and training of moderate numbers of student and/or part-time or temporary workers may be required where the nature of supervision is largely confined to scheduling work, assigning tasks, and reviewing completed work. Supervision at this level may also involve directing the work assignments of a small number of permanent, full-time employees. Supervisory tasks may include providing substantial input into the process of screening and hiring employees and providing performance information for other supervisors to use as part of the employee evaluation processes. Supervisory duties typically involve a small but significant proportion of work day activities. Typical of this level would be an administrative assistant position in which the typical incumbent would be responsible for screening and hiring two or three work study employees every year and directing the daily activities of four student workers, one graduate assistant, and one full-time clerical employee within a department.

6. 270 points: Supervision of more than one permanent employee, a moderate number of part-time or temporary employees, and/or large numbers of student workers that involves a full range of supervisory responsibilities including staffing the unit, training employees, planning work, and reviewing work and employee performance. The job may require close and/or frequent supervision and considerable responsibility for performance management. At this level, supervisory duties constitute a moderate amount of work time. Most first-line supervisors are at this level. A typical example would be an office manager who is responsible for maintaining a staff of six full-time administrative support employees, three student workers, and two half-time employees, assigning work to them, and regularly assessing individual performance.

7. 380 points: Supervision of a department work group of more than one full-time employee involving skilled or complicated work or coordination of the work of a group of employees located in subsidiary units. Supervision at this level involves the direction of skilled work, specialized tasks, or work of a complicated nature. This level is typical of technical specialists or paraprofessionals who supervise other specialists or coordinate work in technical or skilled areas. This level would also include jobs in which the supervisory tasks require the supervision of other supervisory employees. Typical of this level would be a Registration Supervisor who coordinates and monitors the work of a group of clerical employees, or an Executive Assistant for a university official who coordinates work on projects involving other administrative support personnel. Supervisory tasks consume considerable proportions of work time at this level.

 

Job Family 1, Factor IV: Guidelines

How the work is controlled including the nature of the guidelines received, the judgment needed to apply them, and the degree of personal control over actions taken. Guidelines include the degree to which specific oral or written instructions including supervisory instructions, policy manuals, regulations, handbooks, standard operating procedures, etc. exist to guide the activities undertaken in the job. Job controls refer to the types of judgmental actions that can be taken and the degree to which personal control and freedom to select a course of action is constrained.

1. 100 points: Specific detailed guidelines covering most aspects of the job exist and deviations from guidelines must be authorized.

2. 130 points: The work generally involves sequential steps and methods explained by the supervisor and/or described by specific guidelines such as standard operating procedures, handbooks, and/or reference manuals. Tasks are relatively clear-cut and involve related steps, processes, and methods. The employee may be required to recognize differences in a variety of situations, but those differences are normally clear and require the selection of standard processes to resolve. The number and similarity of guidelines and work situations requires the employee to use judgment in locating and selecting the most appropriate guidelines, references, and procedures for application and in making minor deviations to adapt guidelines in specific cases. Situations to which the existing guidelines cannot be applied or proposed deviations from the guidelines are referred to a supervisor.

3. 220 points: The employee carries out a group of procedures using the general methods and desired results indicated by the supervisor. Typically, standard operating procedures, handbooks, and/or reference manuals exist for most procedures, but the incumbent must select from the most appropriate of several guidelines, and make minor adjustments to methods. The employee uses judgment in interpreting and adapting guidelines such as University policies, regulations, precedents, and work directions for application to specific cases or problems. The employee makes decisions regarding most deviations from the guidelines, but major deviations from guidelines are referred to the supervisor. Assignments are related in function and objective, but processes, procedures, or software varies from one assignment to another. Based on the assignment, employees use diverse but conventional methods, techniques, or approaches. Jobs at this level may perform work that is moderately complex, but normally performed within a fairly narrow and specific functional area.

4. 370 points: The employee operates under general supervision expressed in terms of program goals and objectives, priorities, and deadlines. Supervision is given through statements of departmental, program, or project objectives and available resources. Administrative guidelines are relatively comprehensive, and employees need only to fill in gaps in interpretation and adapt established methods to perform recurring activities. In unforeseen situations, the employee must interpret inadequate or incomplete guidelines, develop plans, and initiate new methods to complete assignments based on those interpretations. Assignments are normally related in function, but the work requires many different processes and methods applied to an established administrative or professional field. Problems are typically the result of unusual circumstances, variations in approach, and incomplete or conflicting data. The employee exercises judgment in interpreting the intent of guidelines, methods, and procedures, and determines the best process to achieve objectives.

5. 580 points: The employee operates under administrative supervision. Supervision is given through broad statements of unit objectives and available resources. Administrative guidelines and policies may be broad and unspecific, and employee may need to fill in gaps in interpretation and adapt established methods to perform both recurring and non-recurring activities. The employee exercises judgment in interpreting the intent of unit policies and may be responsible for creating new procedures, new guidelines, and methods for dealing with novel issues.

 

Job Family 1, Factor V: Contacts

The nature and purpose of contacts with others defined in terms of the individuals and groups with whom the incumbent is required to interact, the nature of the exchange, and the interpersonal skill required for the interaction.

1. 25 points: Contacts are typically limited to immediate supervisor and work team. Little or no formal contact with the general public, students or others outside one's immediate work group is required.

2. 45 points: The purpose of interactions may include obtaining or clarifying facts, or providing factual information to others. Contacts may be with co-workers or structured exchanges with students or the general public, and are generally for the purpose of exchange of information. Contacts at this level might include purchases of tickets at a ticket window or cashing checks for students at the Bursar’s office.

3. 105 points: The purpose of interactions is to advise or counsel students or the general public, or to plan or coordinate work efforts with other employees who are working toward common goals and where relationships are generally cooperative. Contacts are moderately structured and routine. Examples would include working with a purchasing office to buy new equipment, providing information about course prerequisites within the department, or obtaining required information from job applicants.

4. 205 points: The purpose of interactions is to solve recurring and structured problems, to provide specialized or technically precise information to others, and/or to plan or coordinate work efforts with other employees. Contacts involve cooperation and coordination and may involve the organization of activities of programs requiring working relationships among several parties. While contacts may require some level of persuasion, potential for conflicts and disputes are relatively minor. Interactions are moderately structured and routine and may involve employees in different functions, students, and/or the general public. These types of interactions require normal interpersonal skills. Examples of contacts at this level might include the coordination of information gathering at the college level from departments, assisting students with registration problems, and providing financial aid information to prospective students.

5. 345 points: Interactions with others are somewhat unstructured. The purpose may be to influence or motivate others, to obtain information, or to control situations and resolve problems. Interactions may be with individuals or groups of co-workers, students, or the general public, may be moderately unstructured, and may involve persons who hold differing goals and objectives. Individuals at this level often act as a liaison between groups with a focus on solving particular unstructured problems. Interactions at this level require considerable interpersonal skill and the ability to resolve conflict. Contacts at this level might involve responsibility for regularly resolving disputes with vendors or contractors over prices or delivery of products and services.

6. 525 points: Contacts may involve regular interaction with senior executives other than one’s supervisor, officials from government entities, elected officials, members of the media, etc. which require the exercise of independent judgment and discretion in communicating information on behalf of the supervisor. Contacts with others may involve the communication of sensitive or confidential information to others with a need to know, as well as the obligation to maintain confidentiality of sensitive information obtained during the course of doing one’s job. Contacts at this level might include communicating information to the press on behalf of one’s supervisor, relaying information to or from a member of the Board of Governor’s, an NCAA senior official, or other senior University official, providing information to parties involved in lawsuits, or maintaining confidentiality of information related to grievances or other sensitive issues.

 
Job Family 1, Factor VI: Work Impact

The degree to which the work affects the work of others and/or the effects of the services or work outcomes on faculty, staff, students, or the general public. The work impact includes the effects of properly performed work products or services on other activities, products, processes or services.

1. 100 points: Work activities normally address conventional problems or situations with established methods to supply other employees, students, or the general public with information, services, or products. Work directly affects the quality of services provided to other employees, students, or the public but on a person-by-person basis. The services, information, or products provided have relatively minor effects on the welfare of the individual recipients of the work outcomes.

2. 175 points: Work activities normally address conventional problems or situations with established methods to supply other employees, students, or the general public with information, services, or products. Work directly affects the quality of services provided to other employees, students, or the public but on a person-by-person basis. The services, information, or products provided have significant effects on the welfare of the individual recipients of the work outcomes.

3. 300 points: Work activities normally address conventional problems or situations with established methods to supply other employees with information, services, or products they use to perform their work. Work products or services facilitate the work of other employees and directly affects the ability of other employees to timely complete specific tasks or processes. Work activities may affect the quality of services provided to moderate numbers of employees, students, or the public, but the services, information, or products provided have relatively minor effects on the welfare of the affected groups.

4. 475 points: Work activities normally address conventional problems or situations with established methods to supply other employees with information, services, or products they use to perform their work. Work products or services facilitate the work of other employees and directly affects the ability of other employees to timely complete specific tasks or processes. Work activities may affect the quality of services provided to moderate numbers of employees, students, or the public, and the services, information, or products provided have significant effects on the welfare of the affected groups.

5. 700 points: Work activities address conventional problems or situations with established methods to supply departments, programs, classes or units with information, services, or products to perform work and enable departments, programs, or units to function properly. Work products or services directly impact the operation, accuracy, reliability, acceptability, or design of programs, systems, or equipment that affects the operation of individual departments or units. Work activities directly affect the services or products provided by the department, unit, or program, the welfare of staff, students or others that use the services or products of the department, program, or unit, or the reputation of the department, program, or unit.

6. 975 points: Work activities may be complex and may involve resolving critical or unique problems. Work products or services directly impact the work of other professionals or the development and operation of programs, affect major activities across units, and/or impact the well-being of large numbers of individuals. Work activities substantially affect the operations and/or reputations of multiple or critical departments, programs and/or units.

 

Job Family 1, Factor VII: Physical Effort and Work Environment

The level of physical exertion required by the job and the degree of discomfort in the work environment. This factor may include requirements to lift and carry objects, prolonged standing, working in awkward positions, or exposure to disagreeable working conditions.

1. 25 points: The work environment consists of exposure to physical conditions typical of a normal office environment. Most of the job is performed while setting although the work may require occasional standing or walking and/or the lifting and carrying of small objects.

2. 50 points: The work may include limited but regular exposure to uncomfortable physical conditions and/or variable weather. The work may require periodic handling, carrying, or lifting of moderately heavy objects. Alternatively, the work may require standing and/or walking for long periods of time and/or the use of hands or arms in the same position for long periods of time.

3. 125 points: The work environment may include ongoing exposure to unfavorable physical conditions including heat or cold, or working in uncomfortable or confined positions. The work requires regular lifting, carrying, or handling of moderately heavy objects. 

 

 

Job Family 1: Job Evaluation Worksheet

 
Job Title: _____________________________________ Date______________ Job Code:__________
 
 

Factor Levels and Points

 

Factor Title

 
1 200 points    8 1460 points
2 260 points    9 1800 points
3 360 points    10 2180 points
4 500 points    11 2600 points
5 680 points    12 3060 points
6 900 points    13 3560 points
7 1160 points
 

Factor I: Education and Experience Equivalencies Chart

Comments:
 
 
1 100 points
2 130 points
3 220 points
4 370 points
5 580 points
 

Factor II: Complexity and Technical Mastery

Comments:
 
 
 
1 0 points
2 30 points
3 60 points
4 110 points
5 180 points
6 270 points
7 380 points
 

Factor III: Responsibility for the Work of Others

Comments:
 
 
 
1 100 points
2 130 points
3 220 points
4 370 points
5 580 points
 
Factor IV: Guidelines
Comments:
 
 
 
1 25 points
2 45 points
3 105 points
4 205 points
5 345 points
6 525 points
 
Factor V: Contacts
Comments:
 
 
 
1 100 points
2 175 points
3 300 points
4 475 points
5 700 points
6 975 points
 
Factor VI: Work Impact
Comments:
 
1 25 points
2 50 points
3 125 points
 

Factor VII: Physical Effort and Work Environment

Comments:
 
 
Summary
 
 
Factor
 
Level
 
Points
 

Factor I: Educational and Experience Equivalencies Chart

 
 
 
 
 

Factor II: Complexity and Technical Mastery

 
 
 
 
 

Factor III: Responsibility for the Work of Others

 
 
 
 
 

Factor IV: Guidelines

 
 
 
 
 

Factor V: Contacts

 
 
 
 
 

Factor VI: Work Impact

 
 
 
 
 

Factor VII: Physical Effort and Work Environment

 
 
 
 
 

Total Point Value