Latin American Studies Courses

Explore topics in Latin American, Caribbean, and Hispanic studies

The following course list includes all options for this minor. The typical offerings listed for each course are estimates and subject to change. Work with your advisor when scheduling your classes each semester.

  • ANT 330 Peoples and Cultures

    Anthropological study of a cultural region of the world (such as the Caribbean, Latin America, or Southeastern Indians), including environment, subsistence, technology, economy, social and political organization, and religion. Variable content course. May be repeated when topic changes.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • ART 273 Survey of the Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

    General Education Course (Focus on Humanities).

    A survey of the art and architecture produced by the cultures of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • ART 485 Art of Mesoamerica

    Prerequisite: ART 273.

    The art and architecture of Mesoamerica and the cultures that produced it. May be taught concurrently with ART 685. Cannot receive credit for both ART 485 and ART 685.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ART 496 Selected Topics in Art History

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    The specific topics will change from semester to semester depending upon the interest of students and professors, e.g. German Expressionism, History of Photography, The School of Paris, Cubism and its Progeny, Pre-Columbian Art in North America. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • ART 598 Seminar in Art Education

    In-depth study of specific topics and/or interaction with leaders in the fields of aesthetics, art criticism, art history, art making, and art education. Variable content course. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours. May be taught concurrently with ART 698. Cannot receive credit for both ART 698 and ART 598.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Summer
  • ENG 354 Ethnic American Literature

    Prerequisite: ENG 110.

    Study of representative literary works by African American, Hispanic American, Native American, or other minority authors. May be repeated to a total of 6 hours if topic is different. Variable content course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • ENG 362 Non-European World Literature

    Prerequisite: ENG 110.

    Literature from all areas (except literature of England, Western Europe, and the United States). Variable content course. May be repeated to a total of 6 hours if topic is different.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    330Upon demandLITR 200 - World Literature.
  • GRY 305 Selected World Regions

    An in-depth study of selected regions of the world. Examples: Tropical Areas, Arid Regions, Polar Regions, Pacific Islands, Australia and New Zealand. Surveys geology, landforms, soil, vegetation, climate, settlement, population, economic activities and the cultural landscape. The course will be devoted to a single region that can vary from semester to semester. Students should check the current registration schedule to determine the topic title for any given semester. Since topics vary, the course may be repeated with permission. Variable content course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • HST 350 Latin American Civilization

    Foundations of Ibero-American civilization including the Amer-Indian, Iberian and African background; Emphasis on the origins of institutions and problems which affect the region as a whole.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • HST 397 Special Topics in History

    Recommended Prerequisite: 3 hours of history. A variable content, variable credit course. Specific subject matter will change from term to term, depending upon the interests of professor and student. May be repeated, as topics change, to a maximum of 6 credit hours. Variable content course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • HST 587 Mexico from Colony to Nation

    Prerequisite: 50 hours.

    Mexican history from the colonial period to the Revolution of 1910. May be taught concurrently with HST 682. Cannot receive credit for both HST 682 and HST 587.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • HST 588 Twentieth-Century Mexico

    Prerequisite: 50 hours.

    Mexico from the Revolution of 1910 to the present, emphasizing Mexico's influence upon the Cuban Nicaraguan and other revolutions; its role as a member of the Middle American Community and of Latin America at large. May be taught concurrently with HST 688. Cannot receive credit for both HST 688 and HST 588.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • LLT 296 Major Authors in Translation

    A course in comparative literature offered in English translation covering one of the following areas: (a) Asian, (b) Germanic, (c) Latin America, (d) Latin and Greek, (e) Romance, and (f) Slavic. May be taken once under each of the six titles. Variable content course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • PLS 338 Politics of Less Developed Countries

    This course offers a road introduction to the politics of poorer, or "less developed" countries, a category that includes about three-quarters of the world's sovereign states and the vast majority of the global population. It focuses on such issues as democratization, economic development and ethnic and religious conflict. Students will also learn about the politics of a number of individual countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall (even-numbered years)
  • PLS 548 Latin American Politics

    Prerequisite: PLS 101.

    Recommended Prerequisite: 50 hours. Broad introduction to the politics of Latin America. Although it will offer substantial historical background, the emphasis of the course will be on recent decades. To familiarize the student with some of the major general issues facing Latin America while also giving them a taste of its tremendous diversity. The course is structured around four basic topics: economic development, democratization, guerrilla movements and revolution, and drug trafficking. In the process of discussing these topics, various countries will be explored such as Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, and Mexico. A recurring theme will be the relationship between the United States and Latin America. May be taught concurrently with PLS 648. Cannot receive credit for both PLS 648 and PLS 548.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • PTG 101 Elementary Portuguese I

    This course is the first part of the introductory sequence in Portuguese. Students acquire Novice Mid-level proficiency in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative modes and begin to explore the cultural perspectives, products, and practices of Portuguese-speaking peoples.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    330FallLANG 105 - Foreign Language I.
  • PTG 102 Elementary Portuguese II

    Prerequisite: C or better in PTG 101.

    This course is the second part of the introductory sequence in Portuguese. Students reinforce Novice Mid-level proficiency and acquire Novice High-level competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative modes while continuing to explore the cultural perspectives, products, and practices of Portuguese-speaking peoples.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    330SpringLANG 106 - Foreign Language II.
  • PTG 201 Intermediate Portuguese I

    Prerequisite: C or better in PTG 102.

    This course is the first part of the intermediate sequence in Portuguese. Students reinforce Novice High-Level proficiency and acquire Intermediate Low-level competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative modes while continuing to explore the cultural perspectives, products, and practices of Portuguese-speaking peoples.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • PTG 202 Intermediate Portuguese II

    Prerequisite: C or better in PTG 201.

    This course is the second part of the intermediate sequence in Portuguese. Students reinforce Intermediate Low-Level proficiency and acquire Intermediate Mid-level competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative modes while continuing to explore the cultural perspectives, products, and practices of Portuguese-speaking peoples.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • REL 397 Religious Studies Topics

    Recommended Prerequisite: 3 hours in Religious Studies. Selected topics of general interest in Religious Studies. Examples: Introduction to Archaeology and the Bible, Women in the Bible, Dead Sea Scrolls, the Holocaust, C. S. Lewis, Food and American Religion. May be repeated, as topics change, to a maximum of 9 hours. Variable content course.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-3Upon demand
  • SOC 336 Race and Ethnicity

    This course explores the social construction of race and ethnicity. Issues of differential power between racial and ethnic groups and the economic, political, and social structures which are utilized to maintain these power differences are identified. Social movements and social policies designed to address social inequality, prejudice and discrimination are also examined.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Upon demand
  • SPN 101 Elementary Spanish I

    This course is the first part of the introductory sequence in Spanish. Students acquire Novice Mid-level proficiency in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative modes and begin to explore the cultural perspectives, products, and practices of Spanish-speaking peoples.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    330Fall, SpringLANG 103 - Spanish I.
  • SPN 102 Elementary Spanish II

    Prerequisite: C or better in SPN 101.

    This course is the second part of the introductory sequence in Spanish. Students reinforce Novice Mid-level proficiency and acquire Novice High-level competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative modes while continuing to explore the cultural perspectives, products, and practices of Spanish-speaking peoples.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offeredCORE 42 (MOTR) equivalent
    330Fall, SpringLANG 104 - Spanish II.
  • SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish I

    Prerequisite: C or better in SPN 102 or SPN 103.

    This course is the first part of the intermediate sequence in Spanish. Students reinforce Novice High-Level proficiency and acquire Intermediate Low-level competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative modes while continuing to explore the cultural perspectives, products, and practices of Spanish-speaking peoples.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring
  • SPN 202 Intermediate Spanish II

    Prerequisite: C or better in SPN 201.

    This course is the second part of the intermediate sequence in Spanish. Students reinforce Intermediate Low-Level proficiency and acquire Intermediate Mid-level competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative modes while continuing to explore the cultural perspectives, products, and practices of Spanish-speaking peoples.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall, Spring