Occupational Therapy Courses

Occupational Therapy (OTE) courses

  • OTE 610 Foundations and Theory in Occupational Therapy

    Prerequisite: admission to the Master of Occupational Therapy program.

    This course establishes a foundation for how theory, frames of reference, and models guide occupation-based practice, as well as the history and development of the occupational therapy profession. The science of occupation key terms and concepts utilized in the field, current issues impacting occupational therapy, interprofessional practice, and professional ethics, values and responsibilities are discussed. The various areas of practice and specialization are also introduced. May be taught concurrently with OTE 710. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 610 and OTE 710.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    440Fall
  • OTE 612 Occupational Development Through the Lifespan

    Prerequisite: admission to the Master of Occupational Therapy program.

    The focus of this course is on the skill progressions in typical and atypical development and how these sequences impact occupational performance across the lifespan; environmental and cultural influences on development are also examined. The cognitive, psychosocial and physical aspects of the person on daily function are discussed in relation to occupation-based practice. The acquisition of values, roles, habits, temporal adaptations, interests and interprofessional collaboration are explored.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Fall
  • OTE 615 Professional Communication and Documentation

    Prerequisite: OTE 610.

    This course establishes the framework for documenting outcomes of occupation-based practice in an interprofessional environment, summarizes current theories and research about clinical and professional reasoning, and provides learning activities such as case studies designed to promote effective reasoning. Students will learn and apply effective documentation techniques used in the profession including electronic medical records.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    220Summer
  • OTE 620 Psychosocial Perspectives in Occupational Therapy Practice

    Prerequisite: OTE 610; and concurrent enrollment in OTE 680.

    This course provides an overview of psychosocial conditions across the lifespan among various environments that impact client function in the areas of occupation, performance skills and performance patterns. Topics include, but are not limited to crisis intervention, therapeutic use of self, specific intervention strategies, group dynamics, types of groups, group protocol development, and interprofessional collaboration. Cultural and community perspectives of mental and physical health are also examined.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Spring
  • OTE 624 Therapeutic Modalities

    Prerequisite: OTE 610.

    A study of the theory and application of various therapeutic modalities used in the treatment of many injuries, including ultrasound, diathermy, electrical stimulation, hydrotherapy, cryotherapy and thermotherapy. May be taught concurrently with ATC 324. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 624 and ATC 324.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    432Spring
  • OTE 640 Evidence-Based Practice

    Prerequisite: OTE 610.

    Course will analyze the clinical reasoning process used in health care disciplines, examine the different types and levels of clinical evidence and explore the implementation of evidence-based practice skills in the client-centered and occupation-based practice. This course establishes a framework to develop interventions, promote health, well-being and community engagement. May be taught concurrently with OTE 740. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 640 and OTE 740.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    220Spring
  • OTE 645 Clinical Gross Anatomy

    Prerequisite: admission to the Master of Occupational Therapy program.

    The course offers in-depth coverage of basic, applied, and clinical aspects of gross anatomy. An advanced, musculoskeletal anatomy course that emphasizes the study of functional relationships between musculature, nervous tissue, vascular, and skeletal components for the extremities and axial skeleton: Cadaver dissection laboratory experience is used to enhance understanding of three dimensional anatomical relationships for specific body regions. Students observe, discuss, teach, learn and dissect all body systems in detail. This course incorporates traditional didactic lectures, discussions, laboratory dissection, students teaching students (peer-teaching) in laboratory sessions, and assignments that rely on critical thinking. Identical with BMS 645. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 645 and BMS 645.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    536Fall
  • OTE 646 Neuroscience

    This course covers the foundations of neuroscience as they relate to the evaluation and treatment of occupational therapy clients. Topics include the properties of cells in the nervous system and major structures and functions of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems; sensory pathways, central processing and output mechanisms and how systems interact to influence occupational performance. Discussion of neurological diagnoses and theories for treatment is included. May be taught concurrently with OTE 846. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 646 and OTE 846.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    432Spring
  • OTE 650 Clinical Biomechanics in Human Performance

    Prerequisite: OTE 645.

    Biomechanical fundamentals and principles as they apply to the human organism; description of normal motion emphasizing orthopedic biomechanics and neuromuscular control. May be taught concurrently with BMS 450. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 650 and BMS 450.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Spring
  • OTE 680 Psychosocial Fieldwork Level I

    Prerequisite: permission of the Master of Occupational Therapy Program Director; and concurrent enrollment in OTE 620.

    This course is designed to provide students familiarity with a variety of clients, diagnoses, age ranges, and contexts; and to see the roles or potential roles of occupational therapists. This is a supervised, 35-40 hour fieldwork experience that provides the opportunity to observe the occupational therapy process and interprofessional practice. This experience will focus on individuals with psychosocial diagnoses. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1Spring
  • OTE 690 Psy Dysfcnt Fieldwork Level I

    Prerequisite: permission of the Master of Occupational Therapy Program Director.

    This course is designed to provide students with continued familiarity with a variety of clients, diagnoses, age ranges, and contexts; and to see the roles or potential roles of occupational therapists. This is a supervised, 35-40 hour fieldwork experience that provides the opportunity to observe the occupational therapy process and interprofessional practice. This course emphasizes adults and older adults with physical dysfunction diagnoses. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1Fall
  • OTE 691 Pediatric Fieldwork Level I

    Prerequisite: permission of the Master of Occupational Therapy Program Director.

    This course is designed to provide students familiarity with a variety of clients, diagnoses, age ranges, and contexts and to explore the potential roles of occupational therapists within the pediatric practice setting. This is a supervised, 35-40-hour fieldwork experience that provides the opportunity to observe the occupational therapy process and interprofessional practice. The course focuses primarily on the pediatric population. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    110Spring
  • OTE 710 Foundations and Theory in Occupational Therapy

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    This course establishes a foundation for how theory, frames of reference, and models guide occupation-based practice, as well as the history and development of the occupational therapy profession. The science of occupation, key terms and concepts utilized in the field, current issues impacting occupational therapy, interprofessional practice, and professional ethics, values and responsibilities are discussed. The various areas of practice and specialization are also introduced. May be taught concurrently with OTE 610. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 610 and OTE 710.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    440Fall
  • OTE 720 Conditions I: Cognitive Dysfunction

    This course provides an overview of the etiology, incidence and prevalence, signs and symptoms, course and prognosis, and medical management of common cognitive conditions impacting occupational performance. The effects of neurological conditions, disabilities, and disorders on individuals are examined within the cultural context of family, community, and society. Relationships among cognitive disorders, impairments, activity limitations, function/dysfunction, and participation restrictions are emphasized in relation to their impact upon occupation. Students begin to explore occupation-based assessment and treatment of the various conditions seen in interprofessional practice. May be taught concurrently with OTE 820. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 720 and OTE 820.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Summer
  • OTE 725 Environmental Adaptations and Assistive Technology

    Prerequisite: admission to the Master of Occupational Therapy program.

    Concepts, principles, selection and application of environmental adaptations and assistive technology to improve client function across the lifespan will be examined. Domains presented include, but are not limited to vision, hearing, communication, mobility, cognition, and environmental controls, and interprofessional collaboration. Modifications and high and low technology devices used in occupation-based practice will be discussed.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    212Fall
  • OTE 730 Enablers and Barriers: Adult Occupations

    Prerequisite: OTE 720.

    This course provides an overview of the etiology, incidence and prevalence, signs and symptoms, course and prognosis, and management of common adult conditions impacting occupational performance. The effects on individuals are examined within the cultural context of family, community, and society. Enablers of and barriers to participation are emphasized in relation to their impact on occupation and co-occupation. Students begin to explore occupation-based assessment and treatment across contexts and interprofessional practice settings.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    432Fall
  • OTE 732 Applied Research Methods in Healthcare

    Prerequisite: admission to the Master of Occupational Therapy program.

    Research course in which students deepen their understanding and enhance their research abilities in order to contribute to the advancement of their chosen health care discipline. Course will explore topics of research design and research methods for conducting applied and clinical research projects with a focus on conducting outcomes-related research that can support clinical practices in the student's respective health care discipline. May be taught concurrently with OTE 832. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 732 and OTE 832.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • OTE 740 Evidence-Based Practice

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    The course will analyze the clinical reasoning process used in health care disciplines, examine the different types and levels of clinical evidence, and explore the implementation of evidence-based practice skills in the client-centered and occupation-based practice. This course establishes a framework to develop interventions, promote health, well-being, and community engagement. May be taught concurrently with OTE 640. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 640 and OTE 740.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    220Spring
  • OTE 745 Therapeutic Skills I: Adult Practice

    Prerequisite: OTE 720.

    Provides an overview of scientific inquiry, assessment, intervention planning and implementation of occupation-based practice with adults aged 21 and older; special consideration is given to the context of the family, community, environment and culture. The effects of selected medical conditions most commonly seen in occupational and interprofessional practice within this age group are covered. Students gain practical experience through the lab portion of the course which includes emphasis on intervention for adults.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    432Fall
  • OTE 746 Management and Policy in Occupational Therapy Practice

    Prerequisite: OTE 615.

    This course introduces the student to the role of the occupational therapist as a manager and leader within the broader interprofessional health care system. Students are introduced to management functions, including fiscal management, marketing, and human resource functions. Discussion of regulatory systems, legal considerations, reimbursement mechanisms, current health care policy and emerging issues impacting health care practitioners is provided. Supervisory issues specific to the occupational therapist are explored. Students will identify and illustrate the role of occupational therapy in current policy issues regarding services to underserved communities.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • OTE 749 Enablers and Barriers: Pediatric Occupations

    Prerequisite: OTE 730.

    This course provides an overview of the etiology, incidence and prevalence, signs and symptoms, course and prognosis, and management of common pediatric conditions impacting occupational performance from infancy to early adulthood. The effects on individuals are examined within the cultural context of family, community, and society. Enablers of and barriers to participation are emphasized in relation to their impact on occupation and co-occupation. Students begin to explore occupation-based assessment and treatment across contexts and interprofessional practice settings.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    432Spring
  • OTE 750 Therapeutic Skills II: Pediatric Practice

    Prerequisite: OTE 745.

    Provides an overview of scientific inquiry, assessment, intervention planning, and implementation of occupation-based practice from birth to age 20; special consideration is given to the context of the family, community, environment and culture. The effects of selected medical conditions more commonly seen in occupational and interprofessional practice with this age group are covered. Students gain practical experience through the lab portion of the course which includes observation, evaluation, and assessment of children.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    432Spring
  • OTE 760 Specialty Topics

    Prerequisite: admission to the Master of Occupational Therapy program.

    Variable topics course. In-depth study of contemporary occupation-based practice. Each offering concerns a single topic. Topics of interest will cover areas related to prosthetics and orthotics, low vision, hand/upper extremities, splinting, and current professional issues, interprofessional collaboration, community engagement, clinical evaluation, client interventions, faculty expertise, and/or student interest or needs. Must be repeated for minimum of five hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    110Fall, Spring, Summer
  • OTE 761 Level I Fieldwork Seminar

    Prerequisite: permission of the Master of Occupational Therapy program director.

    This course will provide students with exposure to a variety of clients, diagnoses, age ranges and practice settings, as well as the potential roles of occupational therapists. Course will provide an opportunity for students to interact with clients across the lifespan with a wide variety of diagnoses and occupational performance needs. Students will have the opportunity to observe the occupational process, interact with clients in various practice settings, and gain experience documenting therapeutic outcomes. Must be repeated for a minimum of six hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    220Fall, Spring
  • OTE 765 Community and Health Practice in Occupational Therapy

    Prerequisite: admission to the Master of Occupational Therapy program.

    Coursework will focus on the science, theory and practice of occupational therapy in the promotion of health and wellness and the body's response to stress, illness or injury across the life span. An emphasis will be placed on the cultural and physical context of the community in which occupational and interprofessional healthcare practice occurs. This course integrates knowledge and skills for occupation-based practice to foster healthy development, prevent health problems, maintain optimal function, and enhance the occupational performance skills of individuals, families, and communities. May be taught concurrently with OTE 865. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 765 and OTE 865.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Summer
  • OTE 770 Professional Capstone: Issues, Diversity, and Ethics

    Prerequisite: OTE 732.

    This course integrates elements and issues of professional socialization, the process of taking on the identity of an occupational therapist, and internalizing the norms of the profession. Students will incorporate professional ethics, context of services, and current professional and interprofessional issues, clinical reasoning, client-centered practice and evidence-based decision-making into the occupational therapy process. Clinical scenarios related to diverse populations and practice domains will be utilized to synthesize occupation-based interventions.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    322Spring
  • OTE 780 Fieldwork Level II, Part 1

    Prerequisite: completion of all didactic coursework; and permission of the Master of Occupational Therapy Program Director.

    This course is the first half of the final practice experience in the curriculum to develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupational therapists. This supervised, 12-week fieldwork experience provides in-depth experience in delivering occupational therapy services to clients, focusing on the application of purposeful and meaningful occupation and/or research, administration and management of occupational therapy services. Students demonstrate an ability to evaluate, treat, document and discharge clients with a variety of conditions across the lifespan and in a variety of practice areas. Professionalism, clinical reasoning skills, reflective and ethical practice, and communication with clients, significant others and professional colleagues are enhanced. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    6Summer
  • OTE 790 Fieldwork Level II, Part 2

    Prerequisite: OTE 780; and permission of the Master of Occupational Therapy Program Director.

    This course is the second half of the final practice experience in the curriculum to develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupational therapists. Supervised fieldwork experience provides in-depth experience in delivering occupational therapy services to clients, focusing on the application of purposeful and meaningful occupation and/or research, administration and management of occupational therapy services. Students demonstrate an ability to evaluate, treat, document and discharge clients with a variety of conditions across the lifespan and in a variety of practice areas. Professionalism, clinical reasoning skills, reflective and ethical practice, and communication with clients, significant others and professional colleagues are enhanced. This in-depth supervised fieldwork will be in a different practice setting than Fieldwork Level II, Part 1. Students must complete a total of 12 weeks of Fieldwork Level II, Part 2 coursework in either one 12-week experience or two 6-week experiences. Must be repeated for a total of six hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    3-6Fall
  • OTE 798 Research Project

    Prerequisite: OTE 732; and permission of the Master of Occupational Therapy Program Director.

    In-depth scientific study of an occupation-based clinical problem of interest that culminates in a scholarly paper and formal community presentation. Must be repeated three times for a total of three hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1Fall, Spring, Summer
  • OTE 820 Conditions I: Cognitive Dysfunction

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    This course provides an overview of the etiology, incidence and prevalence, signs and symptoms, course and prognosis, and medical management of common cognitive conditions impacting occupational performance. The effects of neurological conditions, disabilities, and disorders on individuals are examined within the cultural context of family, community, and society. Relationships among cognitive disorders, impairments, activity limitations, function/dysfunction, and participation restrictions are emphasized in relation to their impact upon occupation. Students begin to explore occupation-based assessment and treatment of the various conditions seen in interprofessional practice. May be taught concurrently with OTE 720. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 720 and OTE 820.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Summer
  • OTE 832 Applied Research Methods in Healthcare

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    Research course in which students deepen their understanding and enhance their research abilities to contribute to the advancement of their chosen health care discipline. Course will explore topics of research design and research methods for conducting applied and clinical research projects with a focus on conducting outcomes-related research that can support clinical practices in the student's respective health care discipline. May be taught concurrently with OTE 732. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 732 and OTE 832.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    220Fall
  • OTE 840 Advanced Evidence-Based Practice

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    This course is designed to enhance current practice through the application of evidence-based interventions. Includes the development of a line of inquiry, based on clinical scenarios, with the goal to demonstrate population-specific outcomes, the validity of intervention, and the cost-effectiveness of service delivery. The course examines evidence-based practice from conceptual, empirical, practical, and personal perspectives. Learning experiences include the creation of a critically appraised paper that promotes the socialization process of doctorally prepared practitioners and occupational therapy leaders.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • OTE 846 Neuroscience

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    This course covers the foundations of neuroscience as they relate to the evaluation and treatment of occupational therapy clients. Topics include the properties of cells in the nervous system and major structures and functions of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems; sensory pathways, central processing, and output mechanisms and how systems interact to influence occupational performance. Discussion of neurological diagnoses, theories for treatment is included. May be taught concurrently with OTE 646. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 646 and OTE 846.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    440Spring
  • OTE 860 Advanced Clinical Practice

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study new and/or specialized treatment techniques and their theoretical foundations in a specific area of practice. Practical applications of the selected treatment techniques are analyzed.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Spring
  • OTE 861 OT as Educator

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    This course examines the philosophical foundations of knowledge and learning and their relationship with occupational therapy theoretical principles. Major approaches to teaching are discussed, and implications for occupational therapy practice are sought. The educative role of occupational therapists in various settings, including clinics, hospitals, community agencies, and colleges and universities, is explored and identified. This course's major content areas include instructional design, methods, skills, and media; evaluation; and education and supervision of students during experiential learning.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    220Spring
  • OTE 862 Occupational Therapy Teaching Practicum

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    This is a field experience-based course that requires the student to spend a minimum of 40 clock hours in a graduate teaching environment where students observe, teach, and/or participate in professional activities in graduate teaching under the direction of a cooperating supervisor/faculty member. The course emphasizes effective teaching and assessment techniques, as well as expertise in instructional planning and evaluation.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    220Fall
  • OTE 865 Community and Health Practice in Occupational Therapy

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    Coursework will focus on the science, theory, and practice of occupational therapy in the promotion of health and wellness and the body's response to stress, illness, or injury across the life span. Emphasis will be placed on the cultural and physical context of the community in which occupational and interprofessional healthcare practice occurs. This course integrates knowledge and skills for occupation-based practice to foster healthy development, prevent health problems, maintain optimal function, and enhance the occupational performance skills of individuals, families, and communities. May be taught concurrently with OTE 765. Cannot receive credit for both OTE 765 and OTE 865.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    212Summer
  • OTE 880 Doctoral Capstone Experience Preparation and Planning

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    The student engages in the development of in-depth experience in one or more of the following areas: clinical practice skills, research skills, administration, leadership, program and policy development, advocacy, education, and theory development.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    220Fall, Spring, Summer
  • OTE 901 Advanced Ethics and Advocacy

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    This course focuses on ethical reflection, mediation, and decision-making in occupational therapy. Theoretical frameworks, concepts, and applied analytical strategies are examined critically in relation to their application to clinical practice. An emphasis is placed on the acquisition of skills necessary to perform ethics-related service and assume leadership roles in health care organizations, communities, professional associations, and regulatory agencies.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • OTE 921 Cultural and Contextual Influences

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    This course will facilitate cross-cultural skills by promoting self-awareness and understanding of various cultural influences on the health care profession from macro, meso, and micro perspectives. These perspectives will be used to address the impact these factors have on therapy delivery, outcomes, and occupational performance for clients, communities, and populations.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • OTE 965 Health Disparities and Social Determinants of Health

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    This course examines key social determinants of health, such as education, economic stability, health status and access to health care, and social and community contexts. The course teaches about the relationship between social determinants of health, the inequitable distribution of resources, and the contribution to health disparities and inequities. The impact of social determinants of health on health equity for individuals, groups, and populations is examined.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    330Fall
  • OTE 980 Doctoral Capstone Experience and Project

    Prerequisite: admission to the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program.

    This course provides an in-depth opportunity to pursue the individually designed doctoral-level project that synthesizes the knowledge, attitudes, and skills and enables students to achieve specific competencies related to advanced practice. The project builds upon knowledge gained throughout the Doctor of Occupational Therapy Program, including 1) the use of research evidence to make clinical decisions, 2) leadership and change within systems and treatment contexts, and 3) development of theory-based innovative programs to meet the needs in a variety of practice areas and society at large. In addition to developing the final doctoral project for submission to a peer-reviewed journal, the course strongly encourages to share findings through the state, national, and/or international presentations. Variable content course. May be repeated for a total of seven hours.

    Credit hoursLecture contact hoursLab contact hoursTypically offered
    1-7Fall, Spring, Summer