CHPA Annual Report for 2013

College of Humanities and Public Affairs

Annual Report 2013 – Prepared by Victor H. Matthews, Dean

  1. A. Assessment Efforts:
    1. 1. External Program Review

The Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice prepared for and experienced an external review of their program in 2013. The department wrote a self-study in 2012-2013 based in part on CJS accreditation guidelines, which was approved by the dean and the Office of the Provost. Dr. Barbara Peat served as the external reviewer for CRM. Dr. Peat is the Director, School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University-Northwest, and is an experienced external reviewer. She conducted a site visit at Missouri State in November 6-7, 2013, submitting her written report on November 14, 2013. While the report expresses a favorable view of the department, it does contain a number of recommendations for improving both the undergraduate and graduate programs. In spring 2014 the department developed an Action Plan in response to Peat’s suggestions, with planned implementation beginning in 2014-2015. The external review process continues to prove beneficial to the departments and the college and serves as an opportunity for self-assessment and dialogue among faculty about their curriculum and future plans. The review process is described here.

The MPA program in PLS prepared an accreditation self-study and hosted a team of reviewers from NASPA in fall 2013. The team identified a number of concerns primarily to do with assessment rubrics for MPA courses and a perceived lack of attention to diversity in student and faculty recruitment efforts. A follow up visit was scheduled for spring 2014 that would then assess the progress made on these issues and produce a final report in July 2014 determining whether accreditation of the MPA program would be renewed.

  1. 2. Assessment Revisions and Results in the College

After completing revisions of their assessment plans in spring 2012, each Department in the college began to implement or in some cases continue to revise their plan. A college-wide assessment committee assisted in coordinating this effort to create a revised and realistic set of Student Learning Objectives for each program, which would address disciplinary goals as well as the University’s Public Affairs Mission (the latter also a reflection of the efforts to revise the University’s General Education Program for implementation in fall 2014). Conclusions drawn in the process include expected variations based on discipline, the previous forms of assessment measures, and the desire to take advantage of this opportunity to make better use of the data produced by the newly shaped assessment methods. What has emerged is a more systematic formal structure with rubrics tied to specific learning outcomes, especially for General Education courses in the light of the revision of that entire program. A summary of the plans for each department are found here.

The individual departmental assessment reports for 2013 appear in Appendix A to this general report.

  1. 3. Curricular Changes

During 2013 several Departments in CHPA conducted curricular assessments and made revisions to their curriculum. In every case, the impetus for these efforts was to (1) bring the curriculum into line with disciplinary standards, and (2) to contribute to student success through a more focused set of courses or new certificate options.

  1. Four new certificate programs in CRM were created in the fall 2013 semester that will target those interested in a career in law enforcement or those already in law enforcement who wish to attain 60 hours of college credit to enhance their opportunities for promotion. These four certificate programs will become available in the fall 2014 semester, and marketing plans will be established in the summer of 2014.
  2. A Weapons of Mass Destruction Certificate was added for NDU fellows participating in the DSS program.
  3. In response to a suggestion by their external reviewer in 2011, ECO created a new class (ECO 101) that provides instruction for non-majors in financial responsibility and basic economic principles. The course was approved for inclusion in the new General Education curriculum.
  4. History made minor changes in the BSED to conform to state requirements. Beginning in fall of 2013, students will need a 3.0 content GPA to gain admittance into the education program. Other curriculum changes are being discussed that might improve student performance in HST 598 such as the requirement of a 500 level course.
  5. Several curricular changes went into effect for REL in fall 2013. The number of credit hours required for the BS major was increased from 33 to 39 hours, the restriction against double-counting Gen. Ed. courses for the major was removed, and students may now take up to 9 hours of REL 397 credit. These changes are designed to make it easier for students to major in Religious Studies, while requiring BS students to enroll in more courses with the department in lieu of additional arts and language requirements that BA students must complete. The department also approved giving credit toward the REL minor for the EDC 345: Introduction to Multicultural Education and Diversity course, which is required for BSED students. It is hoped that this latter change will make it easier for Education students to add a minor in Religious Studies. The Department of Elementary Education at MSU also gave formal approval to adding Religious Studies to its list of minor options for its students.
  6. Lyle Foster (SOC), Mike Stout (SOC), and Bill Wedenoja (ANT) served on a task force preparing a proposal for a new minor in Diversity Studies that was subsequently approved by CGEIP and the Faculty Senate in spring 2014.
  1. Enrollment Management Analysis
  1. Total SCH:
    Six years of total SCH in CHPA by calendar year continues to demonstrate fluctuations in enrollment with lower division continuing to show a growth pattern while upper division has declined (primarily due to a reduction in the number of majors and minors), and a set of peaks and valleys for graduate SCH. With the decline in majors, the steady pattern of growth in overall SCH from 2008 to 2012 ended in 2013 with a decline of 2.2%. The College’s SCH continues to be heavily dependent on General Education and with the introduction of a new General Education program in fall 2014 these figures will have to be watched carefully.

Calendar Year

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012


2013

Course Level

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Lower Division

51,203

51,970

52,116

54,105

55,862


56,536

Upper Division

18,270

17,904

17,936

18,311

18,912

16,838

Graduate

3,314

4,135

5,072

4,634

4,366

4,831

Total

72,787

74,009

75,124

77,050

79,140


78,205

Efforts to improve recruiting for graduate programs and the Department of Defense contract with the National Defense University have helped to stabilize graduate enrollments and increase applications. The MPA courses in health care policy have also added a cohort of physicians to that program’s overall production. Dedicated academic advisors in CRM, HST, and PLS continue to assist current, new, and transfer undergraduate students with their scheduling and contribute to departmental planning for future offerings.

  1. General Education:
    As noted above, CHPA is heavily dependent upon its General Education course offerings. As much as 62% of the college’s SCH comes from this source and therefore the revision of the GE program during 2012-2013 has the potential to significantly impact departments like ECO, HST, PHI, PLS, REL, and SOC/ANT. Noteworthy is the fact that some of our GE courses have shifted into new categories and will be competing with courses in other colleges and that ECO has added two new courses to the GE program: ECO 101 and 165. It should also be noted that many students are taking advantage of the A+ program with local community colleges or are participating in dual credit in their high schools. As a result many have credit for CHPA General Education courses prior to coming to MSU. The chart below compares the census enrollment figures of fa12 and fa13. Individual course fluctuations from one year to the next are caused in part by the number of sections offered, but a .9% decrease in SCH in fall 2013 is due in large part to the reduction in sections of AAS and GST.

Course

Enroll–
fa12

Sections fall 12

Enroll – fa13

Sections fall 13

%Enroll fa13/fa12

 

PHI 105

95

2

95

2

100%

AAS 100

259

5

150

3

57.9%

 

PHI 110

401

8

327

7

81.5%

ANT 100

326

8

372

8

114.1%

 

PHI 115

356

8

374

9

105.1%

ANT 125

70

2

93

2

132.9%

 

PLS 101

1497

22

1502

21

100.3%

ECO 155

815

13

863

13

105.9%

 

REL 100

594

14

567

14

95.5%

GST 170

35

1

0

0

N/A

 

REL 101

122

5

138

5

113.1%

HST 103

269

6

251

6

93.3%

 

REL 102

94

3

94

4

100%

HST 104

278

7

335

9

120.5%

 

REL 131

214

6

205

5

95.8%

HST 121

667

14

667

13

100%

 

REL 210

209

4

275

6

131.6%

HST 122

809

18

809

18

100%

 

SOC 150

713

12

640

9

89.8%

         

Totals

 

CHPA

7728

 

7662

 

99.1%

 

  1. Graduate Programs:
    One concern for the College has been the inability to maintain steady growth in its graduate programs. Some of that decline is attributable to a shift in emphasis in the College of Business that no longer requires ECO 600 and ECO 710 for their MBA students. In other cases the drop is based on fewer graduate students being recruited into the college’s programs and that is being addressed with the appointment of new graduate directors in CRM, HST, and the MPA program for fall 2013 and new recruitment publications and refreshed websites. Only CRM and DSS have shown significant growth while ANT, PLS, and REL have remained relatively steady.
 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Term

Dept

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit
Hours

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Fall

TOTAL

1,509

2,379

2,260

2,058

2,122

2,187

 

CRM

0

0

0

259

276

243

 

DSS

279

495

591

543

708

663

 

ECO

120

276

225

180

123

66

 

HST

244

349

369

318

249

261

 

PHI

0

0

3

0

0

0

 

PLS

486

672

510

549

549

735

 

REL

105

140

145

110

124

120

 

SOC/ANT/CRM

275

447

417

99

93

99

Spring

TOTAL

1,334

1,501

2,257

2,149

1,809

2,100

 

CRM

0

0

0

0

206

315

 

DSS

324

312

489

561

501

573

 

ECO

114

96

222

135

60

42

 

HST

225

196

325

329

299

278

 

PHI

0

0

0

0

3

0

 

PLS

421

573

645

615

549

770

 

REL

136

84

129

149

114

114

 

SOC/ANT

114

240

447

360

77

120

The chart above indicates that CRM, DSS, and PLS are the prime generators of graduate level SCH for the college. Growth in CRM suggests that it is maturing as a program and will soon be attracting more students from outside of Missouri. Both the masters programs in Public Administration and Global Studies can handle a larger number of students, and at this point some efforts are being made to shift more MPA classes to online mode and more vigorous recruiting efforts are being made for both programs. While somewhat cramped by their facilities, DSS has added an online course and uses its ITV equipment when possible. They continue to grow and the receipt of the National Defense University contract has brought them additional students. HST has lost ground during 2012 and 2013 and greater efforts by the new Graduate Director will be needed to recruit larger numbers of students and develop more online classes. The program in ANT, while still fairly new, has stabilized and been able to recruit a cohort with excellent credentials and of a size that can be handled by current faculty. REL has maintained a steady level for many years. More aggressive recruiting efforts by the new Director can build on their enrollments, especially from universities outside the region, since they have the capacity for growth.

  1. Study Away Programs:
    During 2013 CHPA faculty developed and lead study away programs to many overseas locations. A major part of the college’s efforts to promote cultural competence, these programs included an archaeological field school in Jordan, ethnographic research in Guatemala, the examination of political systems in Croatia and Slovenia, and study of the criminal justice system in England. The college provides $15,000 per year as scholarships for students wishing to participate in these programs.

Faculty

Program Title

Location

Bethany Walker (HST)

Archaeological Field School

Jordan

David Romano (HST)

Understanding the Yugoslav Civil Wars

Slovenia and Croatia

David Byers (ANT)

Zooarchaeology of Jamaican Coastal

Foragers

Jamaica

Patrick Gartin (CRM)

Criminal Justice Across the Pond

London

Jason Shepard (ANT)

Anthropology Field Experience

Guatemala

 

  1. Access:
    CHPA has made concerted efforts to increase accessibility through a number of measures including the redesign of departmental websites that are more intuitive and attractive to students and the introduction of a range of teaching modalities. That includes the development during 2013 of a MOOC on “Ozark Studies” by Brooks Blevins (HST) and the addition of new online courses (especially in General Education and graduate courses).

    Although the vast majority of students are still enrolled in traditional seated classes during the day, there has been steady growth in the number of students enrolled in online and blended courses. That is evidenced by the steady increase in online enrollments from 765 to 11,327 from 2007 to 2013.
    CHPA SCH Growth in INET Courses
 

FY

FY

FY

FY

FY

FY

FY

 

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

 

SCH

SCH

SCH

SCH

SCH

SCH

SCH

CHPA

765

1,659

3,048

4,752

7,065

8,248

11,327

In terms of growth in SCH among the modalities, internet and blended courses continue to do well and are becoming the modality of choice for students, especially in the intersession and summer sessions. Evening classes took a significant dip in 2013, perhaps due to growth in internet offerings and a decline in demand for General Education courses at night. The College will continue to work in the coming year with Joye Norris to gauge the need for seated and blended evening courses. Dual Credit did revive its numbers in 2013; however, competition with OTC and other schools will have to be watched in the coming year.

CY

CY 08

CY 09

CY 10

CY 11

CY 12

CY 13

Traditional

55,565

57,602

55,403

54,699

54,371

50,975

Off Campus

2,090

1,887

2,146

2,177

2,139

2,454

I-Courses

2,423

2,582

2,934

3,213

2,635

2,479

Intersession

1,419

1,002

1,421

1,094

919

565

Internet

1,659

3,048

4,752

7,065

8,248

11,327

Evening

8,301

6,240

5,982

5,091

6,466

5,474

Dual Credit

975

1,215

948

840

747

864

Blended

--

135

1,206

2,616

3,162

3,780


The total number of on-line course offerings reached a temporary plateau in 2012, but rose quickly in 2013. Since 2008, departments other than CRM have joined the trend toward offering online classes and that suggests additional growth in the future. CRM’s placement of their entire undergraduate and graduate program online has been completed and is complemented by numerous on-line offerings in the summer session each year.

Number of On-Line Sections offered by CHPA Departments

Dept

SP06

FA06

SP07

FA07

SP08

FA08

SP09

FA09

SP10

FA10

 

SP11

 

FA11

SP12

FA12

SP13

FA13

ANT

                               

1

 

CRM

2

2

3

5

4

2

4

7

7

10

 

12

 

13

12

10

15

17

DSS

                           

1

1

0

1

ECO

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

1

1

1

 

1

 

2

1

2

1

1

HST

1

2

1

3

4

3

2

4

4

4

 

5

 

5

6

3

6

7

PHI

                         

1

1

1

1

1

PLS

2

2

3

2

2

2

4

4

5

6

 

12

 

6

8

5

10

8

REL

                         

1

2

2

2

3

SOC

     

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

 

2

 

1

2

4

5

3

TOTAL

5

7

7

12

11

9

11

17

18

22

 

32

 

29

33

28

41

41

 

  1. Majors and Graduation Statistics and Analysis

During the course of the past six years, the number of CHPA undergraduate majors had slowly but steadily risen until 2013 when a drop in majors is noted. This has been attributed, at least in part to the decline in Law School enrollments, something that has had an impact on History, Philosophy, and Political Science.

Fall 2008

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Fall 2013

Undergrad

Undergrad

Undergrad

Undergrad

Undergrad

Undergrad

Majors

Majors

Majors

Majors

Majors

Majors

1,221

1,283

1,358

1,364

1,380

1,247

Despite this recent decline, CRM continues to be the most popular undergraduate major in CHPA, growing from 311 majors in fall 2008 to 481 in fall 2013, a 54.7% increase. However, the decoupling of the CRM major from the SOC/ANT Department has contributed to a decline in SOC majors from 140 in fall 2008 to 74 in fall 2013 (a 52.9% decrease). The SOC faculty are making efforts to advertise their “Public Sociology” emphasis, but it is expected that it will take several years for them to significantly increase the number of their majors. Two other programs are worth noting: (1) ANT has seen a 24.3% increase from 111 to 138 majors and (2) ECO increased from 63 to 77 majors (a 22.2% increase). No other undergraduate degrees have seen positive changes and in fact most have sustained a downward trend during this time period.

In terms of graduate programs, DSS continues to benefit from its placement in the Washington, DC area. They have grown from 54 to 92 majors in the period from fall 2008 to fall 2013. This growth is due in part to their ability to draw on adjunct faculty to teach technical courses and most recently the contract with the Defense Department in cooperation with the National Defense University. Over the next five years it will bring cohorts of up to 24 students per semester, on top of current student numbers. PLS and CRM are also showing signs of growth and should be able to increase their graduate majors over the next few years.

CHPA

Fall 2008

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Fall 2013

DEPT

Program

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

   

1,467

1,549

1,628

1,638

1,650

1,529

CRM

 

0

0

0

532

563

525

 

CRIM-BS-COMP

0

0

0

0

1

0

 

CRIM-MS

0

0

0

28

31

13

 

CRIM-MS-X

0

0

0

0

0

14

 

CRMA-MS

0

0

0

1

3

6

 

CRMN-BA

0

0

0

38

49

62

 

CRMN-BS

0

0

0

455

468

360

 

CRMN-BS-E

0

0

0

0

0

7

 

CRMN-BS-X

0

0

0

0

0

52

 

HSAD-GRCT

0

0

0

10

11

11

DSS

 

54

62

74

71

93

92

 

DEGE-MS

0

0

0

0

28

42

 

DEST-GRCT

0

2

1

0

2

1

 

DEST-MS

54

60

73

71

46

21

 

DEWM-MS

0

0

0

0

17

28

ECO

 

63

64

67

60

74

77

 

ECOC-BS

24

27

21

24

27

20

 

ECON-BA

14

5

6

6

6

7

 

ECON-BS

25

32

40

30

41

50

HST

 

358

372

397

391

353

284

 

HIMA-MA

0

0

0

0

1

3

 

HIST-BA

107

119

133

135

115

90

 

HIST-MA

51

57

53

54

40

43

 

HITC-GRCT

0

0

0

0

1

1

 

HSTE-BSED

192

189

202

190

187

143

 

IDHI-BA

0

0

1

1

1

0

 

SEHI-MSED

3

4

5

6

4

4

 

SESS-MSED

5

3

3

5

4

0

PHI

 

41

39

43

37

35

31

 

PHIL-BA

25

26

24

15

18

14

 

PHIL-BS

16

13

19

22

17

17

PLS

 

255

258

254

235

220

207

 

GLBA-MGS

0

0

0

1

1

0

 

GLBS-MGS

0

30

16

22

16

25

 

IAAD-MIAA

34

0

7

5

0

0

 

POLC-BS

33

38

17

4

0

0

 

POLI-BA

50

54

56

36

36

30

 

POLN-BS

96

97

130

137

139

121

 

PUBA-MPA

2

0

2

1

1

3

 

PUMG-BA

4

5

1

0

0

0

 

PUMG-BS

8

6

3

2

1

0

 

PUMG-MPA

27

28

21

24

25

13

 

PUMG-MPA-E

0

0

0

0

0

13

 

PUMT-GRCT

1

0

1

3

1

2

REL

 

96

99

96

90

82

82

 

IDRE-BS

0

0

1

0

1

1

 

RELA-MA

0

2

4

6

6

3

 

REPR-GRCT

0

1

0

0

1

0

 

REST-BA

65

61

39

33

28

23

 

REST-BS

0

9

28

34

29

37

 

REST-MA

31

26

24

17

17

14

 

REST-MA-E

0

0

0

0

0

4

SOC/ANT

 

600

655

696

222

230

231

 

ANTH-BA

43

44

46

54

54

55

 

ANTH-BS

68

68

70

82

88

83

 

APAA-MS

0

0

0

0

0

4

 

APAN-MS

9

16

22

20

14

14

 

CRIM-BS-NONC

0

0

2

0

0

0

 

CRIM-MS

29

32

30

0

0

0

 

CRMC-BA

3

6

9

0

0

0

 

CRMC-BS

92

39

11

0

0

0

 

CRMN-BA

17

27

36

0

0

0

 

CRMN-BS

199

307

371

0

0

0

 

HSAD-GRCT

0

5

7

0

0

0

 

IDSO-BS

0

0

2

0

0

1

 

SOCI-BA

13

5

9

15

18

13

 

SOCI-BA-PRE

0

4

6

0

0

0

 

SOCI-BS

127

75

56

48

54

61

 

SOCI-BS-PRE

0

27

19

3

2

0

 

1,467

1,549

1,628

1,638

1,650

1,529

A further measure of undergraduate student success in CHPA is its graduation rate. Over the five year period from 2009 to 2013 the college has averaged 304 degrees conferred. Although PHI has fallen below the mandated 5/year average during this period at 8.8, it is actually serving more students than any other Philosophy program in the state except the one at MU-Columbia. The largest number of graduates by far is in CRM, averaging 97.2 each fiscal year. As a result of this success, a number of resources have been shifted to support CRM, including the addition of two full-time instructors and two new Assistant Professors, who will begin with us in fall 2014.

 

FY2009

FY2010

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

5-Year

Degree

DEPT

Program

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Avg.

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Degrees

     

299

302

297

300

323

304

BA

   

66

59

77

84

54

 
 

CRM

         

2

 
 

ECO

 

5

1

1

0

0

 
 

HST

 

23

22

25

43

23

 
 

PHI

 

3

3

7

4

3

 
 

PLS

 

12

5

16

7

9

 
 

REL

 

11

16

11

11

5

 
 

SOC/ANT

 

12

12

17

19

12

 
   

ANTH-BA

8

9

11

17

9

 
   

SOCI-BA

3

2

2

2

3

 

BS

   

202

207

193

191

234

 
 

CRM

 

0

0

0

98

121

 
 

ECO

 

12

21

19

15

18

 
 

PHI

 

7

5

3

4

5

 
 

PLS

 

31

28

22

22

36

 
 

REL

 

0

5

7

16

12

 
 

SOC/ANT

 

152

148

142

35

42

 
   

ANTH-BS

23

19

13

16

26

 
   

CRMC-BS

61

22

2

0

0

 
   

CRMN-BS

20

67

93

0

0

 
   

IDSO-BS

0

0

2

0

0

 
   

SOCI-BS

48

40

32

19

16

 

BSED

HST

 

31

36

27

25

35

 

The number of graduate students in each program has been addressed above. The chart below provides data on the number of graduates from each program. After just four years, the CRM degree has exceeded the five/year average, but the MS in Applied Anthropology only began to produce graduates in 2011 and will require more time to determine its viability. All other programs in CHPA exceed the necessary graduation success rate of 5/year (with the MSED in HST counted as part of the department’s overall graduation rate). Of course, the number of graduates fluctuates from year to year depending on the backlog of students who finally complete their theses or seminar papers after exceeding the normal two year period of instruction.

 

FY2009

FY2010

FY2011

FY2012

FY2013

5-year avg

Degree

DEPT

Program

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Number

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Degrees

GRCT

   

0

18

11

8

13

10

 

CRM

 

0

0

0

7

10

 
 

DSS

 

0

12

1

0

1

 
 

PLS

 

0

0

0

1

1

 
 

REL

 

0

1

1

0

1

 
 

CRM

HSAD-GRCT

0

5

9

0

0

 

MA

   

22

9

29

19

18

19.4

 

HST

 

13

5

21

14

7

 
 

REL

 

9

4

8

5

11

 

MGS

PLS

 

8

4

8

8

7

10.6

MIAA

PLS

 

0

12

5

1

0

 

MPA

PLS

 

11

17

5

12

6

10.2

MS

   

30

28

35

43

34

34

 

CRM

 

7

8

8

11

7

 
 

DSS

 

23

20

25

27

24

 
 

ANT

 

0

0

2

5

3

 

MSED

HST

 

1

0

2

3

2

1.4

 

72

88

95

94

80

85.8

Minors are another factor in the success of CHPA Departments. They contribute an interesting mix to the discussion in upper division courses and in some cases they become majors. The chart below tracks minors in CHPA Departments over a six-semester period. These numbers tend to fluctuate but are usually higher in the spring semester.

Number of Minors in CHPA Departments/Programs

Depts/ Programs

Sp 11

Fa 11

Sp 12

Fa 12

Sp 13

Fa 13

ANT

37

39

31

30

25

31

CRM

74

92

105

111

116

108

ECO

77

73

75

73

80

81

HST

102

106

114

102

112

94

PHI

38

31

37

37

32

30

PLS

41

55

50

48

39

38

Public Admin

8

4

2

2

2

3

Public Law

11

14

17

19

20

13

REL

86

111

106

90

77

74

SOC

142

139

140

124

115

96

Area Studies minors in CHPA take advantage of a diversity of courses in CHPA and other colleges. Although these programs do not have a large number of minors, they contribute to the goals of cultural competence and community engagement. Two additional programs have now been approved and will be administered by CHPA. The minors in Diversity Studies and in Disability Studies will begin being offered in fall 2014.

AREA STUDIES Minors

Minors

Sp 11

Fa 11

Sp 12

Fa 12

Sp 13

Fa 13

African American

3

1

4

7

8

6

Asian Studies

20

22

26

23

21

24

Gender Studies

17

16

17

18

14

14

Latin American

3

8

10

9

10

9

Law & Society

10

11

10

9

5

5

Middle Eastern

6

9

5

7

7

9

Native American

3

1

3

2

2

1

Ozark Studies

2

3

5

0

1

1

 

  1. Faculty Productivity
  1. Delaware Study Analysis: (no update of data is available for 2013; see 2012 report and charts)

    An examination of the Delaware Statistics over the past five years for CHPA indicates that all of the Departments in the College are making efficient use of their faculty and are being productive in producing SCH. There is no comparable data for DSS. No CHPA Department uses Graduate Assistants to teach their own course section. Some Departments, like PHI, PLS, and ECO use very few per course faculty, while others like CRM, HST, and REL are more dependent on per course faculty to teach multiple sections of required or General Education courses. The number of Instructors, especially during 2012, also fluctuates based on such factors as sabbaticals or unpaid leaves and the retirement of faculty. In some cases the College has hired Instructors to fill the gap temporarily in order to insure continuity of instruction in courses in the major and in General Education. In some instances, however, Instructors have been added to departments on an ongoing basis in order to maintain the necessary number of General Education or required courses. While preference is given to hiring regular, tenure-track faculty whenever possible, budgetary concerns have resulted in some cases in the hiring of a lower-cost Instructor instead. To be sure that does put a strain on faculty advising, service load, and the support of graduate programs, and therefore it is an option that is exercised with great care.
  2. Scholarly Activity:
    Based on faculty activities during 2013 recorded in Digital Measures, CHPA had a productive year. This can be attributed to projects completed during sabbatical leaves, the hiring of new faculty who are working toward promotion and tenure, and an active research agenda on the part of the majority of faculty in the College. Scholarly production by newly hired tenure-track faculty is generally at acceptable levels, and full professors have been incentivized by the introduction of the PSIP award that will be given for the first time in 2014. Department mentors are employed to assist probationary faculty to improve their teaching and expand their research activities. Faculty members are encouraged to attend advisement workshops, the fall and spring Showcase presentations, and workshops on promotion and tenure sponsored by the Dean’s office and the Provost’s office. Second year probationary faculty are asked to present their current research in the CHPA Research forum.

Year

Journal Articles

Book Chapters

Books

Papers Read

2007

35

17

11

125

2008

32

17

7

116

2009

27

17

10

109

2010

35

27

5

127

2011

56

13

13

152

2012

45

19

17

156

2013

35

37

6

122

Research activities of particular note include:

  • Leslie Baynes (REL) received the Director’s Award for Outstanding Faculty Research from the Missouri State University Honors College
  • Jamaine Abidogun (HST) received a Senior Fulbright to study in Nigeria for the academic year, 2013-2014
  • Bela Bodo (HST) received a fellowship to study in Germany at the University of Jena for the academic year, 2013-2014
  • Dr. David Romano (PLS) is part of an international collaborative research team who just received approximately $900,000 from the Department of Defense for a three-year study to answer the correlating question: who doesn’t become a terrorist and why?
  • B. Garland (CRM), S. Self (ECO), J. Chuchiak (HST), B. Oyeniyi (HST), B. Walker (HST), P. Sailors (PHI), D. Hickey (PLS), D. Romano (PLS), V. Matthews (REL), E. Sobel (ANT) published at least three journal articles or book chapters
  • Scholarly monographs published during 2013:
    • Keith Payne, ed. (DSS), Understanding Deterrence. National Institute Press.
    • John Chuchiak (HST), Ritos, rezos y curaciones mayas yucatecos: una perspectiva diacrónica. Centro Peninsular en Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
    • Eric Nelson (HST), The Legacy of Iconoclasm: Religious War and the Relic Landscape of Tours, Blois and Vendome 1550-1750. University of Saint Andrews Centre for French History and Culture.
    • Bukola Oyeniyi (HST), Internal Migration in Nigeria: A Positive Contribution to Human Development. ACP Observatory Publications.
    • Steve Berkwitz (REL), Buddhist Poetry and Colonialism: Alagiyavanna and the Portuguese in Sri Lanka. Oxford University Press.

Faculty External Grants Funded:

Name

Project

Agency

Amount

Elizabeth Sobel (ANT)

Trail of Tears Project

U.S. Forest Service

$10,436

Brett Garland (CRM)

Evaluation of You Only Live Once St. Louis- Reentry Program, Second Chance Act

Department of Justice

$50,202

Aida Hass (CRM)

Missouri Reentry Initiative Evaluation Study

Missouri Department of Corrections

$9,641

Terrel Gallaway (ECO) & David Mitchell (ECO)

Estimating the Potential Value of the Night Skies above the Colorado Plateau

National Park Service

$22,000

Holly Baggett (HST)

Modernism in Chicago

NEA

$3,000

Holly Baggett (HST) & Kathleen Kennedy (HST)

OLGA Interviews

Black Tie of Springfield

$4,000

Eric Nelson (HST)

Archival work in Paris

Sixteenth Century Society

$3,000

Bethany Walker (HST)

Historische Landnutzung und Landschaftswandel in der Dekapolis-Region

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

$218,228
(2013-2016)

Dennis Hickey (PLS)

Attend annual meeting in Denmark of EATS

European Association of Taiwan Studies

$2,000

Austra Reinis (REL)

Research sermons on Jonah by the Counter-Reformation preacher Michael Helding

Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel, Germany

$4,150

John Harms (SOC), Mike Stout (SOC), Tim Knapp (SOC)

Missouri Civic Health Index

 

National Conference on Citizenship

$30,000

Holly Baggett (HST) and Kathleen Kennedy (HST) helped write a successful grant to create four paid internship opportunities for students doing oral histories with OLGA

  • Marcia Butler (HST) and David Gutzke (HST) successfully applied for and received summer research grants to conduct research in England; while Angela Hornsby-Gutting (HST) received a summer research grant to do research in Washington, DC.
  • Drs. Palacios (PLS) & Ondetti (PLS) hosted Professor Philip Brenner’s presentation “The Cuban Dilemma: Raul Castro’s Reforms and U.S. Policy.” It was supported by a University Public Affairs Grant & co-sponsored by the Latin American, Caribbean, Hispanic Studies Program.
  • Center for Archaeological Research Grants Funded in 2013:

Client

Project

Amount

SHPO

Van Meter Quarry

$16,920.00

SOC/ANT

Archaeological Field School

$5,512.56

HNTB

Steamboat Wreck Magnetometer Survey

$20,355.25

FAC RES Grant

Researching Amerindian Population - Trinidad

$7,237.00

Cultural Resource Analysts

Records Check for 80 Acres in St. Genevieve County

$823.87

Jviation, Inc.

Phase I Survey of 400 Acres for Monett Airport

$8,962.49

Kolb Grading, LLC

Phase I Survey, 12 Acre Borrow & Waste, Benton County, ARK

$3,611.40

Bureau Veritas North American

Intensive CRS, WICC Air Force Cell, Wichita, KS

$1,767.83

Sprenkle & Associates, Inc.

Bridge Replacement over Sac River

$1,976.43

Warmus & Associates

MW Springfield, MO Radio Tower

$2,500.00

SHPO

Train of Tears National Register Nominations

$24,988.71

 

Total

$103,562.61

 

  1. Teaching:
    The quality of instruction in CHPA has always been one of the college’s strengths. Innovations such as online and blended teaching have been readily adopted by many of our faculty, several have made good use of the services and workshops provided by the FCTL, and the Blackboard teaching software has become a standard that assists both instructors and students with course management. Internships, externships, service-learning experiences, and field schools provide students with real world training and have contributed to a better understanding of the university’s Public Affairs mission, their specific academic studies, and job preparation. One means of assessing the success of our teaching is found in nationally normed tests used by several of the departments (MFAT, TUCE, LSAT, and CATS) and the acceptance rate of our undergraduate and graduate students into law schools, medical schools, and doctoral programs in their disciplinary area. For example, 15-20% of PLS graduates have been admitted into law school.

    Among the College’s efforts to provide as rich an educational program as possible has been the research forums developed by various departments (ANT, ECO, SOC). During 2013, these forums provided students the opportunity to present the results of their research (oral presentation and poster presentation) and to showcase their faculty mentors. These included the Anthropology Research Forum (open to both undergraduates and grad students and the Public Sociology Research Forum. Students were also assisted (financially and through mentoring) in making presentations at regional meetings in all of our disciplinary areas.

    CHPA faculty who were recognized for their outstanding efforts in the area of teaching include:

    -- Steve McIntyre (HST) – Foundation Award for Teaching

    --
    Jim Moyer (REL) -- Governor’s Award for Teaching Excellence

    -- Lora Hobbs (REL) -- Master Online Course Recognition from Missouri State Online for her accomplishments in her online REL 100 course

    -- Caryn Saxon (CRM) -- Master Online Course Recognition Award, awarded the “Best in All Categories”

Service:
Faculty service activities take a wide variety of forms. Of course, there is an expectation that faculty share the advisement, service and governance load in the Department and accept election or nomination to College or University committees. Some also function as advisers for departmental and university student organizations. In addition, and as an expression of the Public Affairs mission, a number of faculty members also serve on community boards, perform as pro bono consultants, serve as officers of disciplinary organizations, and perform editorial duties for journals and book series in their field.

Among the faculty most heavily engaged in outstanding service activities in 2013 are:

-- Tim Knapp (SOC) received a Board of Governors Excellence in Public Affairs award for 2013 for his history of community engagement.

-- Margaret Buckner (ANT): elected Secretary of the American Anthropological Association and now a part of the Executive Committee of this international organization.

-- Paula Rector (CRM) has been on the Board of Directors for Harmony House for many years and was elected to the position of President of the Board for 2013.

-- Center for Economic Education partnered with the Missouri Council on Economic Education to run the Mad City Money Simulation at Skyline High School in Urbana, Missouri. Dr. David Mitchell, Mr. John Stuart Rabon, and five economics majors all helped to run the simulation playing the role of different merchants. Approximately 75 high school students participated.

-- David Mitchell (ECO) organized the 3rd Annual Missouri State University Center for Economic Education Conference—“The Affordable Care Act: What to Expect in 2014”. Included a panel of speakers who discussed the impact of the ACA on local businesses, June 2013.

-- Keith Payne (DSS) presented numerous invited briefings at Congressional Hearings and to Senators and other policy makers in Washington, D.C.

-- Coordinated by Kevin Pybas, Political Science hosted a mock jury selection exercise for federal public defenders in preparation for an upcoming death penalty case.

-- Brian Calfano (PLS) coordinated a series of talks and presentations on the topic “The JFK Assassination, 50 Years Later” at Missouri State University, November 18-22.

-- Lora Hobbs (REL): She took a leading role in a project called Sole Food that collects old shoes to raise funds to buy food for the hungry. In conjunction with this project, she helped to coordinate the large-scale Meals a Million food packaging event.

-- Steve Berkwitz (REL) and Martha Finch (REL) collaborated to serve as Book Review Editors for the international quarterly journal Religion.

-- SOC/ANT faculty are actively involved with 35 local community agency boards, committees or
collaboratives in the Springfield/Greene County area.

Space considerations prevent the citation of all of the activities by our faculty and students during 2013, but many have also been recorded in the CHPA Newsletter published on-line each semester:

Spring 2013

Fall 2013 
 
D. Anticipated Activities in 2014

Major transitions of leadership and staff support are among the challenges faced by CHPA departments:

  • CRM will have a new Department Head (Patti Salinas) starting in July 2014
  • ECO will have a new Head (Ken Brown) starting in July 2014
  • SOC/ANT will have a new Head (David Rohall) in spring 2014

A large number of faculty hires were successfully completed in 2013-2014 with new faculty joining departments in fall 2014:

  • CRM hired two new Assistant Professors (Policing and Research Methods)
  • ECO hired a new Assistant Professor (Applied Microeconomics)
  • PHI hired a new Assistant Professor (Ethics)
  • PLS hired two Assistant Professors (Political Theory and Administrative Policy)
  • REL hired one Assistant Professor (Judaism)

During 2014-2015 only two tenure-track faculty searches are currently planned:

  • HST will hire a new Assistant Professor (Ancient Near Eastern History)
  • CRM will a new Assistant Professor (Generalist in Criminal Justice)

Additional initiatives beyond normal procedures:

  • Incorporate new marketing efforts with the assistance of the newly hired V.P. for Marketing
  • Transition to the new General Education program in fall 2014
  • Continue to improve Assessment Efforts in each department
  • Increase Development Efforts, especially the building fund for ROTC and the Alice Bartee Speakers Series, and to enhance scholarship accounts and provide additional sources of travel and research funding for faculty
  • SOC/ANT will write their self-study in anticipation of their external review visit planned for fall 2015

Appendix A: Departmental Assessment Reports

Criminology Assessment Plan:

In 2012, the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice established six learning objectives (SLO) and began to establish the methods by which we would collect data to analyze how well our SLO’s were being met. In the paragraphs below, the SLO will be listed followed by the data collection method and designated courses for data collection, data collected and analysis of the data.

SLO 1. Students will demonstrate academic proficiency in the core criminal justice areas (law enforcement, law and corrections).

Historically, our department used the MFT to measure mastery of content knowledge. As a department, we determined that the MFT might not be the best measure of content mastery for our purposes. We determined that we would create our own test and began constructing this in the fall semester of 2012. Questions were created by instructors responsible for various content areas and sent to the department head who compiled them into a 100 question exam. We also determined that we would use this as a pre-test in our Introduction to CJ course. Because we offer our undergraduate degree online, we also had to create the online version of the test. The exam was given to all sections of CRM 210 and CRM 598 at the end of the Spring 13 semester.

Through the initial trials of the exam we have determined that our measure may not be a valid test of our student’s learning and that there may be some problems with the exam given to the online students. A committee was formed in the fall 2013 semester to address these and other issues and to include identifiers on the test so that we can compare individual tests. We hope to have the revised exam available for use in the fall 2014 semester.

SLO 2. Students will be able to communicate effectively, orally and in writing, using appropriate references and technologies.

Our major assessment efforts were directed at gaining consistency in the assignments that are designated for particular courses. Additionally, we are still working on the creation of standardized rubrics to be used for targeted assignments.

A course release was given to Mike Ramon for fall 2013 to design an online module that will be used in all Intro classes (and in the first MSU class for all transfer students). This online module addresses issues related to criminal justice writing. Students are tested and will have to score 80% or higher in order to pass. Passage of the module will be linked to passage of the course in which the module is offered. The pilot run of the module occurred in the spring 2014 semester in one section of CRM 210. Data have been collected and will be analyzed in summer 2014.

SLO 3. Students will be able to assess the basic quality of research in criminology and criminal justice publications and other media.

Two courses (CRM 340 – Research Methods [a literature review] and CRM 598- Senior Seminar [a policy analysis paper]) which have substantial writing components have been selected for assessing this SLO. Currently, scores for the papers are being collected to analyze. Beginning in fall 2014, papers from each section of the courses will be selected for assessment based on standardized rubrics. Faculty members teaching these courses have been assigned to create the standardized rubrics to use. Papers will be assessed during the summer of 2014.

SLO 4. Students will be able to evaluate ethical issues related to the criminal justice system and criminology.

The primary sources for assessing learning in this area are the exams given in the Senior Seminar (CRM 598). Some instructors used discussion boards to assess student awareness of ethical issues; others used role playing and essays. We are working toward greater consistency in this area and to identify the type of data we will collect for analysis

SLO 5. Students will identify issues of diversity and human rights in relation to the workings of the criminal justice system and criminology.

The primary sources for assessing learning in this area are the exams given in the Senior Seminar. Some instructors used discussion boards to assess student awareness of cultural differences. Training manuals created by the ABA were implemented in two sections. The ABA program incorporates a number of role playing scenarios to heighten awareness of cultural differences and to stimulate discussion of various ways to increase competency. We are working toward greater consistency in this area.

SLO 6. Students will employ critical thinking skills when evaluating issues in criminology and criminal justice.

We do not have a specific measure for this. We know that we are encouraging critical thinking across all of our courses, but our primary focus has been on improving student writing under SLO 2.

Economics Department Assessment Plan:

The ECO Assessment Plan which was developed in 2011 and 2012 was implemented in full for the first time in CY 2013.

  1. 1. Discussion of Assessment Methods

1.1 The Test of Understanding in College Economics (TUCE)—Outcomes 1 & 5

Starting with spring 2012, we are using a new (the newest) version of TUCE produced jointly by the National Council on Economic Education and the American Economic Association. In contrast to the previous version, the results are now reported in percentiles for the Microeconomics and Macroeconomics test separately. A combined percentile score is not available. The test is administered in the spring semester to all students registered in ECO 590 (Senior Research Seminar). This is an appropriate population since these students are close to completing their undergraduate studies and are typically expected to graduate within the calendar year (with most graduating in the spring). The test is offered in two parts—Micro and Macro. The score on the Micro part is used to assess SLO #1, while the score on the Macro part is used to assess SLO #5. The results for Spring 2013 are summarized below in Table 1. Nineteen students took the test and the number and percentage of students scoring in different percentile ranges are indicated in the table.

TABLE 1

SUMMARY OF SPRING 2013 TUCE RESULTS

Percentile

Micro

Macro

90-99

13 (68%)

13 (68%)

80-89

4 (21%)

2 (11%)

70-79

1 (5%)

0

60-69

0

3 (16%)

50-59

1 (5%)

1 (5%)

40-49

0

0

 

The overall performance on both the Micro and Macro sections of the test was excellent. The percentage of students scoring in the 90-99 percentile range was 68% for both Micro and Macro. Further, 89% of students scored in the 80 or above percentile range for Micro, while for Macro the corresponding percentage was 79%. These are very high numbers and indicate that Learning Outcomes 1 and 5 were satisfactorily achieved.

1.2 Rubrics for Assessing Outcomes 2, 3 and 4

Outcomes 2, 3 and 4 are all assessed based on student performance in ECO 590, the Senior Research Seminar. A rubric has been developed to assess each. A summary of the results is provided below. For Outcome 2 (Quantitative Analysis), students were assessed on the basis of the econometric analysis conducted in ECO 590. The components of the assessment (i.e., the categories assessed) are identified in the first row of Table 2. Each category was assessed on a 4-point scale (Excellent, Good, Fair Poor), with 4 being high. The averages of the scores achieved in each category are displayed in the second row of the table, and the overall average for this category was 2.54.

TABLE 2

ASSESSMENT OF QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS (OUTCOME #2), 2013

CATEGORY

Choice of and Discussion of Data

Model

Estimation

Analysis and Organization of Results

Tables and Charts

AVERAGE SCORE

2.75

2.39

2.31

2.64

2.64

Overall Average =2.54

Tables 3 and 4 provide the corresponding information for Outcomes 3 and 4. In all cases the overall average was between Fair and Good, and closer to Good than to Fair. The lowest value was obtained for Quantitative Analysis and the highest for Analysis of an Article in the Popular Press. The latter result, together with the TUCE scores, suggests that students are well-grounded in basic theory and have the ability to apply it to analyze current problems. The comparatively low score in Quantitative Analysis suggests that students still have some difficulty in conducting econometric analyses that are appropriate for the problems they are analyzing. (Interestingly, as will be seen later, in their exit interviews many students identified lack of adequate preparation in Econometrics as one of the weaknesses of the program).

TABLE 3

ASSESSMENT OF LITERATURE REVIEW (OUTCOME #3), 2013

CATEGORY

Choice of Material

Organization

Economic Analysis

Language

AVERAGE SCORE

2.83

2.64

2.69

3.17

Overall Average =2.83

 

TABLE 4

 
 

ASSESSMENT OF ARTICLE ANALYSIS (OUTCOME #4), 2013

 
 

CATEGORY

Choice of Articles

Economic Analysis

Organization and Language

 
 

AVERAGE SCORE

3.03

2.69

3.25

 
 

Overall Average =2.99

 
                     

1.3 General Education Assessment

The new General Education program will go into effect in fall 2014. At that time our assessment of the Gen Ed courses will change significantly both because we will have three Gen Ed courses (ECO 101, 155 and 165) instead of the present one course (ECO 155) and because the SLOs and assessment tools will be different. However, for now we continue with the Gen Ed assessment that has been in place for many years.

As before, the existing Gen Ed Goals Assessment Questionnaire was used for evaluation. The questionnaire contains a set of ten questions designed to assess the degree to which students have understood the general education goals in the areas of (a) Information Gathering, Reasoning and Synthesizing Abilities; (b) Reflective, Creative and Critical Dispositions; (c) Communication Skills; (d) Understanding of Culture and Society. This questionnaire is administered by the faculty during the last two weeks of the fall and spring semesters in each section of ECO 155. Students are asked to specify complete agreement (indicated by a value of 1), partial agreement (indicated by a value of 2), or disagreement (indicated by a value of 3), with a set of statements. Complete agreement would be indicated by all participants declaring values of 1 for all statements, and average values less than 2 would indicate that the goals are being met to a reasonable degree. The overall average scores in spring and fall 2013 were 1.39 and 1.46, providing a strong indication that the course does in fact meet the stated General Education goals.

1.4 Exit Interviews

The last ongoing assessment tool that is implemented every year is the Exit Interview, which is required of all graduating seniors.

Student responses to the exit interviews have been a key input into some significant program enhancements. In the last few years many of the exit interviews have indicated that students would like to be exposed to more math and econometrics. As a direct response to these requests, we have started teaching (since Spring 2009) two calculus-based theory courses and a second-level econometrics course, ECO 508 Intermediate Econometrics. This was taught for the first time (in recent memory) in spring 2012, was taught again in spring 2013 and is scheduled to be taught in spring 2014.

There are two parts to the Exit Interview. First, students must complete a brief questionnaire dealing with specific aspects of the program. Effective in CY 2013, the format of several of the exit interview questions has been altered so as to make it possible to provide a summary numerical score. However, the questionnaire still retains several open-ended questions. The new form is reproduced in Appendix 4. The second part involves an actual interview with the Department Head which includes, but is not limited to, a discussion of the student’s responses to the questionnaire.

There are two parts to the Exit Interview Form: the first part comprises10 questions which must be answered either by picking a level of agreement (Strongly Agree, Somewhat Agree, Neutral, Somewhat Disagree, Strongly Disagree) or a rating (Excellent, Very Good, Good, Fair, Poor). Allotting a score of 5 to the “best” option, 4 to the second best, etc., each response is given a score ranging from 5 to 1 with 5 being high. Based on 18 interviews in CY 2013, we find that the average score in every item but one is above 4.0. The single exception, in which the average score is 3.83 is the rating for “The variety of courses taught within the department.” Unfortunately, there is little that we can do to increase the variety of courses offered with available resources.

The second part of the Exit Interview form consists of 4 open-ended questions. The most striking aspect of the responses was the frequency (10 out of 18) with which individual identified a weakness of the ECO as an inadequate focus on statistics/math/econometrics, with several specifically mentioning calculus-based analysis.

History Department Assessment Report:

As part of our recruitment and retention efforts we measure how well students are mastering the skills outlined by our department’s learning objectives. Better communicating these objectives to students and noting their successes in meeting them may keep students invested in their education.

We are revising our assessment in these courses to meet the new general education requirements and will pilot these changes next year.

We have also begun collecting the assessment data required to measure the success of the changes we made to our major. The assessment data we collect this year will serve as a baseline as it will measure the success of the old major. It will be three years before we have sufficient data to measure the new major because students are just now beginning their sequence of classes. We will also be collecting data from the praxis exam to compare how well students have mastered content in the new major. We will use this data to make any necessary adjustments in course requirements (scale from 5 to 1, excellent to unsatisfactory).

Academic Year 2012-2013 Academic Year, 2013-2014

Topic

5

4

3

2

1

 

Topic

5

4

3

2

1

Historical Awareness

8

9

5

1

   

Historical Awareness

11

0

2

3

 

Thesis

7

6

9

1

   

Thesis

9

2

2

1

 

Argument

8

4

10

1

   

Argument

9

2

2

3

 

Primary Source Use

6

12

3

1

2

 

Primary Source Use

4

3

3

4

1

Secondary Source Use

4

13

5

1

   

Secondary Source Use

5

3

6

1

 

Format

7

6

4

0

2

 

Format

7

5

2

2

 

Style and Grammar

8

7

5

3

   

Style and Grammar

7

5

0

3

1

 

This data is drawn from four semesters of History 598 papers. It is based on a common rubric that provides detailed instructions on how to evaluate each category.

Preliminary Data Suggests:

  • The majority of students obtain excellent or good scores in all categories.
  • Students are especially strong in historical awareness.
  • Thesis and argument were the weakest categories in 2012-2013 but evidence seems to be the weakest in 2013-2014.
  • The Junior Seminar is designed to help students with using primary source materials and we should see some improvement as more students take that seminar before history 598.

Praxis Scores:

Average Test Score

2011

2012

2013

MSS

175.50

192.00

 

BSED

169.17

163.85

166

# of Students

     

MSS

2

1

0

BSED

24

33

38

Preliminary Assessment Data Suggests:

  • Our average praxis exam score remains well above the requirements to teach in Missouri. In order to teach in Missouri, a student must obtain a 152; our undergraduates average over ten points higher suggesting that they are mastering the content necessary to teach.
  • Since BSED students take less content than do BA, we can expect that BA students would have similar scores.
  • Students are learning the necessary content to teach in high school.

Philosophy Assessment Report:

Our primary instrument is the Exit Interview, in which we sit with graduating students for a good half-hour to forty-five minutes and have them answer a number of questions about our program. The questions are probing and provide a great opportunity for criticism. While I think this sort of assessment is always valuable—who better to give us feedback than students, who have sat through every one of our classes?—in a small department like ours, where we really know each and every one of our Majors, the process is particularly valuable. The insights that we gather from these exit interviews provide a terrific basis, for an annual discussion, amongst ourselves, as to the quality of our offerings, which then informs everything from curricular reform to the development of new pedagogic strategies.

Political Science Assessment Report:

For the year 2013, the data from the Major Field Test (MFT) in Political Science is consistent with all previous data. We are above the national average with respect to the overall mean, the three sub-scores of U.S. Government and Politics, Comparative Politics, and International Relations, as well as the three assessment indicators of Analytical and Critical Thinking, Methodology, and Political Thought. That being said, there was a modest decline in the overall mean, and the three assessment indicators. Although still above the mean, these lower scores merit further scrutiny.

Year

Subscore 1

US Govt & Politics

Subscore 2

Comparative Govt

Subscore 3

Internat’l Relations

Assessment Indicator 1

Analytical & Critical Thinking

Assessment Indicator 2

Methodology

Assessment Indicator 3

Political Thought

Total Test

NATIONAL SCORES FOR MFAT FEBRUARY 2005-JUNE 2011

 

50.9

51.3

52.1

69.2

61.3

47.3

149.9

Fall07

61

60

56

83

77

51

161

Spr08

59

58

59

80

75

57

161

Fall08

56

56

58

74

75

57

158

Spr09

61

60

57

81

79

56

162

Fall09

66

65

68

87

85

67

169

Spr10

60

57

60

81

80

50

160

Fall10

57

60

59

76

78

52

160

NATIONAL SCORES FOR MFAT 2011-2013

 

52

52

52

59

45

54

152

Fall 12

64

58

57

69

58

59

161

Spr13

58

59

56

66

49

55

157

Fall13

57

61

59

68

57

48

158

 

Without question, major GPA continues to be highly correlated with success on the MFT. However, as the data below demonstrate, there has been a decline in the average PLS GPA which could explain the decline in the overall mean. The most obvious explanation for this decline, related to our overall decline in majors, is the significant reduction in per-law students. Our drop in majors coincides with the national average decline in pre-law students; approximately 20%. The loss of these high-achieving students has a negative impact on our average GPA and, unfortunately, as the national trend continues, we will see a continued decline in major GPA, already evidenced in spring 2014 GPA and MFT data that will be accompanied by a decline in overall MFT scores.

GPA Spring 2012 2.98 GPA Spring 2013 2.92

GPA Fall 2012 3.00 GPA Fall 2013 2.47

GPA AVG 2012 2.99 GPA AVG 2013 2.70

A similar explanation could be offered for the decline in the assessment indicators. That being said, a continued decline in the Methodology scores may warrant a reexamination of curricular changes made in response to the first program review; eliminating the Empirical field and the subsequent deletion of PLS 475, as well as abandoning the SOC 302 requirement.

With respect to Political Thought, two hypotheses are worth considering and monitoring in 2014. First, creating a required intro level theory course, PLS 330, broadened the exposure of all majors to this subfield. However, fewer students are taking the upper-level theory sequence. It is possible that the absence of a tenure-track theory professor, at least in fall 2013, contributed to this decline. Having a new tenure-track professor in 2014 to attract a larger percentage of majors to the upper-level sequence should result in higher scores on the Political Thought assessment indicator.

With respect to Analytical and Critical Thinking, while likely correlated with the decline in major GPAs, the decline of this assessment indicator suggest two avenues of analysis. First, data from the Office of Assessment has demonstrated that, for 2012, PLS majors performed at a much higher level on all measures of the University Exit Exam; including Critical Thinking. I have requested 2013 data and will continue to gather this data in 2014. Another measure for future analysis of this particular assessment indicator would be students’ General Education GPA. In fact, the General Education GPA, may be a better predictor because of the lack of incentive to perform well on the Exit Exam.

Religious Studies Assessment Report:

The department had been collecting assessment data for several years about its majors, requiring students to submit short papers at the beginning and end of their careers, requiring faculty to submit assessment reports on each major in any Religious Studies class, and requiring students to submit samples of their written work for analysis in an exit interview. This process was revised during the 2011-2012 academic year and implemented in spring 2012.

The department’s full-time faculty held a meeting to examine and discuss the results of the new assessment plan in fall 2013. The faculty concluded that there were too few signs of students developing their critical and creative skills in giving oral presentations, and they resolved to work more in this area in the 2013-2014 academic year. The department also concluded that the assessment plan was burdensome and not generating sufficient data upon which to act. As such the Department Head charged the Assessment Committee with examining the department assessment plan and recommending changes to address these weaknesses. Following input from the Director of Assessment in the university, a new plan was designed and approved in spring 2014. The results from this plan will be analyzed in a faculty meeting scheduled for August 2014. The revised Gen Ed. plan led the faculty to review and revise its assessment procedures for REL 100, REL 101, REL 102, REL 131, and REL 210. Since the new Gen Ed curriculum is scheduled to go into effect in fall 2014, the faculty was tasked with preparing their assessment instruments and plan prior to that semester.

Sociology Assessment Report
 
Graduating seniors in Sociology enroll in a zero credit course SOC 492 Program Assessment and Career Preparation. They meet with their adviser and complete three instruments: 1) a 13 question curriculum survey, 2) a 5-factor, 32 item Civic Attitudes and Skills Questionnaire, and 3) a 77 question multiple-choice Assessment Instrument. Data has been collected for 2013-14 and will be reviewed by the Sociology Committee in Fall 2014.

Anthropology Assessment Report

Anthropology majors give two class presentations, write 12-13 essays, and take a comprehensive final exam in the capstone course, ANT 595. These tasks provide measures of their public speaking ability, writing ability, and knowledge of anthropological history and theory. The percentage of students who were rated as competent in these areas for the past three semesters is as follows:

 

Spring 2013

Fall 2013

Spring 2014

Oral presentation

94%

84%

79%

Essay writing

86%

86%

87%

Knowledge of theory

71%

20%

90%

Discussion: One trend is a decline in competence in oral presentation. Essay ability seems constant. There is a marked difference in knowledge scores from semester to semester. Perhaps the main reason for this is that some semesters students get together and seriously study for the exam and other semesters they do not. Another factor is there was a different instructor in FA2013. Overall, however, we can say that students are generally effective writers and speakers.