Increase the Number of Graduates While Maintaining Academic Rigor and Quality

  • Continue to grow enrollment by maintaining affordability, adding programs in high demand disciplines, increasing the offering of classes in various delivery methods and locations, improving our physical plant and increasing and improving residence hall space
    • Maintain competitive cost of attendance at the state and national level
    • Add at least two new graduate programs and one new undergraduate program in disciplines of strong employment demand (e.g., agriculture, agriculture communications, computer science and dietetics), and expand enrollment in the MSAS program
    • Increase the number of second block courses while continuing to expand the availability of internet courses
    • Pilot the use of ZOOM technology to deliver courses at multiple locations
    • Successfully bond, plan and begin to construct a new health and wellness center, plan for the design and construction of a new traditional residence hall, complete renovations to Glass and Ellis Halls and Blair-Shannon House and plan for the design and construction of renovations to Hill Hall and the Plaster Center
    • Strengthen and maintain relationships with community college partners
  • Aggressively promote the Bachelor of General Studies program among former students with over 100 hours of credit
  • Increase graduation and retention rates of all students with special emphasis on first-generation, Pell-eligible and underrepresented students
  • Increase the number of GEP101 first-generation and college-specific sections and evaluate the impact of specialized GEP 101 sections throughout students’ enrollment
    • Reevaluate the design of the standard GEP101 course
    • Develop a program for high impact experiences for first-generation students beyond the first year (“Bear Path”)
    • Through faculty and administrators in the colleges, create college-level and department-level programs designed to successfully integrate new students, including transfer and graduate students and particularly at-risk students, into the departments within their colleges
    • Develop university-wide programs designed to assist and retain students who have not yet decided on a major
    • Publicize to faculty, staff and students and encourage participation in the I’m First student organization
    • Eliminate developmental math and English classes as appropriate, including the development of a co-requisite MTH130 class for students who scored 20 or 21 on the math section of the ACT
    • Expand gateway course options, including the development of a college algebra option specifically for business students
    • Create and release a new online orientation module for transfer, non-traditional, veteran and graduate students
    • Expand Living Learning Communities (LLCs) and develop strategies so that students in an LLC can take classes together
    • Expand the URSA engagement camp to increase high impact experiences and include more first-generation and underrepresented students
    • Conduct a benchmark study with peer and aspirational institutions about best practices in summer bridge programs
    • Evaluate opportunities to improve and expand advising and related services
    • Restructure academic scholarship programs and out-of-state fee waiver programs
      • Provide a pathway for students who have lost scholarships or fee waivers due to academic performance to regain their scholarships or waivers by improving their academic performance
      • Reevaluate academic performance requirements for students to obtain and retain scholarships and fee waivers
      • Reevaluate scholarship programs for graduate students, with an emphasis on recruiting and retaining underrepresented students and those with financial need
    • Develop strategies that encourage programs to monitor undergraduate and graduate student progress and promote degree completion
    • Develop incentives to (1) encourage reenrollment of academically successful undergraduate and graduate students who have not returned for two semesters or more and (2) complete their final semester
  • Decrease the time from enrollment to graduation thus making college more affordable and increasing the likelihood of graduation
    • Introduce and encourage use of the Student Educational Planner component of Degree Works enabling students to chart individualized semester-by-semester paths to graduation
    • Encourage and incentivize students to take at least 29 credit hours their first year and 30 hours every year thereafter
    • Pilot a program for structured schedules in disciplines with rigid curricular pathways
    • Develop strategies to reduce the number of credit hours required to complete programs
    • Examine course transfer practices to promote efficiency to degree completion
    • Begin to develop a banded tuition model for students taking 12 to 18 credit hours a semester

Action plan table of contents