Missouri State University

Technology Guidelines for Facilities

The following information is provided as a guideline for the inclusion of technologies in Missouri State facilities. By following these guidelines, the University can better implement "best practices." As such, these guidelines will change over time as technology changes and as we learn from our past experiences. This document will be updated on an ongoing basis by the Administrative and Information Services Division, with input from all who are affected by these processes.

These guidelines apply to the construction or modification of facilities on all Missouri State physical campuses. The West Plains and Mountain Grove campuses will follow these guidelines and consult with Springfield campus staff when necessary.

I. Facility Design Process

Information Services should be included early in the design process. The Chief Information Officer (CIO) is the contact point. The CIO will include other members of Information Services, such as the Technology Projects Coordinator, and other University units as appropriate. Including Information Services and other units in the process at an early stage will ensure:

  • The continuity of technology campus-wide and the application of learned "best practices" and standards;
  • That any necessary technology infrastructure modification can begin being considered with sufficient lead time;
  • Accurate cost estimates can be provided;
  • That the resulting work required of Information Services and other units can be better managed and scheduled into their workload; and;
  • Requested variances from the guidelines can be considered and best accommodated.

Submission of a Project Request Form signals the beginning of the facility design process. It is important to determine the feasibility of the project and obtain all approvals before submitting the form. It is also important to determine the room level at this time (see "Classroom Media and Instructor Control Systems").

Rather than automatically reproducing multiple sets of design documents, an e-mail notification will be sent to interested parties outlining the project and announcing the availability of these documents. They will be available for review, and overnight checkout, at Burgess House (Planning, Design & Construction) and Central Stores & Maintenance (Facilities Management). Copies of specific pages can be requested. This process allows a department to request only the individual views needed and avoids expensive, and many times, unnecessary, duplication.

II. Computer-Equipped Classrooms

Computer-equipped classrooms are classroom facilities that provide a computer, or need to accommodate a mobile computing device, at each student station. These rooms require special design considerations. The room should primarily be designed to meet instructional needs. All other technology decisions should be made to support this primary need. Thus, it is imperative to involve faculty representatives and the Head of Media Services in these projects from the initial design phase.

  • Adjustable table (not required by ADA, but recommended by Missouri State)
  • 21" computer monitor
  • Internal voice synthesizer card
  • Ergonomic keyboard
  1. Funding

    Funding of the equipment to be housed within computer-equipped classrooms may or may not be part of the construction budget. This determination needs to be made at the start of any project. Lifecycle funding must be considered and resolved regardless of the initial funding source. Given the rapid obsolescence of computing and networking technologies, it is imperative that funding responsibilities and funding streams be identified prior to project implementation.

  2. Electrical Power and Data Network

    Ample power and data network ports must be provided in the proper locations. Base all electrical power/data locations on the layout of the room taking into consideration the actual furniture to be purchased and installed. Design should provide one data port and one duplex electrical outlet (two plugs) for every networked device in the classroom. Consider the use of an uninterruptible power supply (UPS). Powered tables with cable trays are recommended. Locations should not be based on the furniture plans supplied by the architect unless the actual furniture to be purchased matches the plans. It is recommended that Planning, Design & Construction be involved with both power/data and furnishings design. The University unit responsible for specifying and/or ordering the classroom furniture should be consulted to determine actual furniture layout. Consideration must be given to how power and network cables will be routed to and run within the furniture. A room is usually designed around furnishings; be sure those specific furnishings (or suitable substitutes) are purchased. Be specific when specifying furnishing - it helps in room design.

    If the room is to accommodate a data/video projector (mobile or permanently mounted), the location of the projection screen will determine the location of the instructor's station. A projection screen centered at the front of a classroom should result in the instructor's station being located to one side of the screen (the students' view should not be blocked). Thus, the power and data for the instructor's station should be located to the desired side as specified by the faculty representatives. To accommodate mobile carts carrying multimedia equipment, power and/or data connections should be located where the cart will be used.

  3. Computers

    All computer-equipped classroom equipment specifications are to be coordinated through the Office of Information Technology for review and approval. This process will ensure that classroom equipment adheres to all applicable University guidelines and standards. Since funding of this equipment comes from various sources, other units may need to be involved in this process depending on the budget.

    The location of the CPUs must be considered. If these are set on the table, they tend to block both the instructors' and students' view. If located on the floor, they can be easily kicked or damaged or may prevent the chair from moving closely to the table. The use of under-table racks to house CPU's is strongly recommended. They reduce damage to the CPU, allow better line of sight between the instructor and student, and provide additional desktop space to the student.

    Each computer-equipped classroom should provide at least one station that will accommodate a disabled student (the actual number will be in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act Architectural Guidelines). This includes providing the following items:

    The actual configuration is to be determined by the Assistive Technology Support Specialist in conjunction with Disability Support Services

  4. Furniture

    The University strongly encourages that furnishings be included in the total project designed by Planning, Design & Construction to ensure a cohesive finished product. Since a room is usually designed around furnishings, be sure those furnishings, or suitable substitutes, are purchased.

    Tables hosting computers can have keyboard trays (see "Appendix C") and should have cable guides. A minimum of 3 feet of horizontal table space is strongly recommended per computer station. (Thus, use 6-foot tables rather than 5-foot tables when putting two computers side-by-side.) The 3-foot minimum will provide students with adequate tabletop space for other materials, allow room for under-table CPU storage, and allow use of the keyboard trays without the mouse pads interfering with each other. The keyboard trays should raise and lower so wheelchairs can get under the trays. The keyboard trays will accommodate right-handed mouse pads, by default, but a small number of left-handed trays could be used. Consult with the occupants of the room before selecting. The University avoids the use of "submerged monitor" computer desks since these tend to severely limit legroom and have a significantly higher cost, and tend to increase monitor glare.

    Based on the recommendation from Disability Support Services, an adjustable table may be required for the assistive technology workstations. Disability Support Services should be consulted early in the project.

    For guidelines on instructor furniture, see the "Classroom Media and Instructor Control Systems" chapter in this document.

  5. Room Design/Layout

    The assistive technology workstation should be located on the end of the front row nearest the door. If sufficient space is available for wheelchair access, it could be located in the center of the front row, however, if placing the station in the center of the row blocks the view of other students, then the end of the row would be more practical. Visually impaired students typically prefer a location in the front row so that they can more easily see the instructor and other activities at the front of the class. If this workstation blocks the views of other students, consider locating it on the end of the row, near the door. An optional location for the printer may be needed to accommodate impaired students. Give consideration to room lighting - screen glare should be reduced as much as possible.

    Note the guidelines for locating the instructor's station in section "B. Electrical Power and Data Network" earlier in this chapter.

  6. F. Security System

    A security system is required in a computer-equipped classroom. If the room will be staffed at all open times, then only door sensors and motion detectors are required. If the room will not be staffed at all open times, then the equipment should be laced with a fiber optic cable that is always armed. Security systems are not funded by the construction budget; for more information, see the chapter entitled "VII. Security Systems" within this document.

    Please note that the layout of the room does impact the security system costs if a fiber lacing system is to be used. In general, longer rows of workstations are less expensive to lace than short rows. While pedagogical concerns typically take precedence over cost differences, cost differences can be significant and should be considered.

  7. Instructor Control and Classroom Media System

    Most computer-equipped classrooms require some type of instructor control system. These systems allow multiple media input devices (computers, VCRs, laser disc players, document cameras, etc.) to be sent to the data/video projector for display. Some provide remote control of room lighting, window coverings, etc. They vary widely in functionality and cost. Specific needs should be identified by the "owning" faculty representatives and the ultimate selection determined by what can be accommodated by the project budget.

    If a "control center" podium is to be used, the faculty representative should decide between a "smart" podium (all electronics embedded in the podium) and a Niemeyer podium (see Appendix B) as soon as possible.

  8. Location of Room

    Consideration should be given to accessibility for persons with disabilities. For security reasons, computer-equipped classrooms should not be located on the first floor unless no other location is available.

III. Classroom Media and Instructor Control Systems

Classroom media systems provide audio and video capabilities to instructional environments. These systems can vary widely, from a simple overhead projector to a "smart" lectern controlling many input/output devices in a media-rich environment. Classroom media systems also vary widely in cost and ease of use. Faculty representatives, working closely with Media Services (and perhaps a consultant), should design the classroom media systems within the specific budget allocation. If a "control center" podium is to be used, faculty representatives should decide between a "smart" podium (all electronics embedded in the podium) and a Niemeyer podium (see Appendix B) as soon as possible. Since the demands of each classroom are somewhat discipline-specific, each room may be unique. Actual design, and installation, should be coordinated by the Head of Media Services.

Any contract with an instructional technologies vendor should include a requirement to participate in a follow-up session with affected faculty/staff within five to seven months after the room is used. This session should be used to determine how the room equipment needs to be "tweaked" and to learn from the experience and should always take place before any warranties expire.

Funding of classroom media and instructor control systems can come from a variety of sources.

Important: Funding discussions should be held with the Chief Information Officer during the initial concept. Do not wait until the design stage.

It is important that funding be discussed before the appropriation request so that appropriate line item estimates can be included. Room furnishings should also be discussed at this stage.

For any room that may be used as an interactive television (BearNet, GrizzNet, VineNet) facility, contact Distance Learning and Instructional Technology Center for design criteria and recommendations and cost estimates.

Classrooms will be categorized into the following four levels for the purposes of room scheduling, standardization, and tracking the University's progress as classrooms are upgraded over time. Classrooms will be assigned a target level during the design phase of construction/remodeling projects so more accurate cost estimates can be provided.

Level 1 Room: Provides accommodations for minimal instructional technologies. Typically contains only electrical outlets on the four walls and in a recessed floor outlet (for an overhead projector, mobile media cart, etc.), a pull-down projection screen, and window coverings to darken the room as needed.

Level 2 Room: Provides accommodations for minimal instructional technologies by providing the same features as a Level 1 room, but also includes a network port for the instructor's use. Thus, the room allows the instructor to bring in a computer for networked use in the classroom and a portable data/video projector, but does not provide the computer or any display device permanently housed within the room.

Level 3 Room: Provides the same features as a Level 2 room, plus a permanently mounted data/video projector and motorized projection screen. Thus, the instructor can bring a media input device (computer, VCR, laser disc player, etc.) into the room, easily connect into the projection system, and display the image on the projection screen for student viewing.

Level 4 Room: Provides the same features as a Level 3 room, plus other permanently installed instructional technologies (e.g., "smart" podium with control system, computer for instructor and/or students, installed media input devices such as VCR or laser disc player, audio system) to create a "media rich" environment. This type of room may also include special lighting control systems that allow separate control of lighting at the front, center, and rear of the classrooms. These rooms should provide adequate marker board space for the instructor to use even when the projection screen is in use.

The following matrix shows the types of devices and features typically found in each level of classroom. While these guidelines are not absolutely firm, the intention is to provide a general impression of the level of instructional technologies or accommodations present in each classroom for room scheduling, comparison, and tracking purposes.

Feature/Equipment AvailableClassroom Level
1234
Electrical outlets (all four walls) Y Y Y Y
Floor conduit (may not be possible in renovations) Y Y Y Y
Room-Darkening Shades Y Y Y Y
Permanent projector screen        
   Manual Y Y    
   Motorized     Y Y
Network Port for Instructor   Y Y Y
Data/video projector        
   Portable   Y   Y
   Permanent     Y Y
Instructor Computers       Y
Student Computers       Y
Printer       Y
"Smart" podium control system       Y
Media input devices (permanent)       Y
Adjustable lighting (front, center, and rear controls)       Y
Sufficient board space       Y

The following are the guidelines per classroom level:

  1. Level 1 Room
    • An electrical outlet should be located in a recessed floor box where the equipment is most likely to be used. The location will be determined by the Head of Media Services after consultation with the "owning" facility.
    • Projection screen location and size should be determined.
    • Blackout shades should be available so students in the back row with normal sight can see the projected image.
  2. Level 2 Room
    • Follow all Level 1 design guidelines (above).
    • The data network port should be located near the instructor's teaching location. Typically, this is not in front of the projection screen since the instructor will want to stand/sit to one side of the screen during a presentation.
    • An optional data network port may be required near the center or back of the classroom for network access if a computer-based cart will be used. Consider location of the media cart while in use (distance from screen may force location in middle of room) and the subsequent impact on seating arrangements. Room must be available to both maneuver the cart into the desired location and provide adequate student viewing around the cart when in use. Based on past experience, a mobile media cart tends to be clumsy and may not be the optimal solution in all situations.
    • A conduit may be required in the back of the room if a slide projector will be used. The conduit will be required only if a wired remote is to be used. A wireless remote will not require this conduit expense and is recommended, however, secure storage must be provided.
  3. Level 3 Room
    • Follow all Level 1 and 2 design guidelines (above).
    • The instructor will provide a portable computer; one will not be furnished with the room.
    • The Head of Media Services should coordinate equipment to facilitate the design of Level 3 rooms.
    • Projection screen should typically be located in the front, center of the classroom. Consult with the faculty representatives for exact location, however, since some may prefer the screen in the corner of the room (thus enabling the instructor to stand in the front, middle of the classroom rather than to one side). Regardless, the instructor's station should not be located directly in front of the projection screen. If a power outlet is needed on the ceiling for the projector, it must be noted during the design process. Waiting for a multimedia contract vendor may result in reconstructing the ceiling. A projection screen of sufficient size (based on Dr. Niemeyer's specifications) should be included in the design. The choice of a manual or a powered screen will be based on budget considerations. If a powered screen is to be installed, the switch should be located near the instructor's station.
    • The marker board should be as wide as possible (as standard marker boards allow) so sufficient space is available to the instructor. Lighting should be provided so that, during an electronic presentation, the marker board can be seen without washing out the projection screen.
    • The data/video projector should be ceiling mounted whenever possible. (Mounting can be accomplished "in house" by the Maintenance and Head of Media Services departments or can sometimes be contracted with the supplying vendor. The use of a safety cable should be considered.) Conduit should be provided (at least 1 1/2") in the wall and ceiling between the projector and instructor's location. An electrical power outlet should be provided in the ceiling near the location of the projector (as determined by Head of Media Services or the contracted vendor). If installation and configuration of this equipment is included in the bid, the contractor will perform these duties. Otherwise, installation is to be completed by Missouri State personnel. Maintenance and Head of Media Services will install, wire, configure, and test the projector.
    • The Head of Media Services provides the ongoing maintenance and support for these units (unless ongoing maintenance and support was included in the contract with an off-campus vendor).
  4. Level 4 Room
    • Follow all Level 1, 2, and 3 design guidelines (above).
    • The Head of Media Services should help coordinate the design of Level 4 rooms.
    • If "smart" podiums are to be included in the room, their location should be to one side of the presentation screen. These podiums may contain equipment racks to house computers, VCRs, laser disc players, control systems, amplifiers, and other media input and control devices. They may also include a flip-up shelf on which to place other media input devices (e.g., document cameras) and the input panels into which to plug these devices and laptop computers. A small light should be included atop the podium for the instructor's convenience. An "auto shut off" feature is desired for the entire podium. A clock should also be included.
      • These podiums should be serviced by wiring that has been run through the floor. Consider using multiple floor boxes rather that one large one. For remodeled rooms, the podium should be tethered to the side wall, rather than the front wall, to minimize the instructor's inconvenience
      • Conduit should be placed in the wall where the "smart" podium is serviced. The largest PVC conduit that can fit vertically in standard walls should be included. This conduit should be considered in all future classroom designs, even if the associated equipment is not going to be installed in the near future.
      • A fiber optic "lacing" security cable should be snaked through the same conduit, attached to the tethering cable, and looped through the "smart" podium.
    • The data/video projector may be controlled via either a remote control, a touch-screen control panel, or computer software. The faculty representatives and the Head of Media Services should be consulted as to which of these solutions is most appropriate and cost effective.
    • Storage for mobile media carts within the building should be provided, if these are to be used.
    • Approval of the "smart" podium's computer configuration must be received through Planning, Design & Construction and the Chief Information Officer.
    • Appropriate lighting control is vital to the use of these technologies. Separate lighting controls should be provided for the front and rear of the room. Dimmable or phased controls are desired.  Window coverings should provide for adequate darkening of rooms so that projections can be adequately viewed.
    • The sound quality required in the room should be determined. Based on this established need, a separate audio system may be required/desired. If low- to medium-quality sound is required in the room, the speakers within the data/video projector should be considered. If high-quality sound is required, a separate audio system (external speakers, amplifier, cabling, switcher) should be considered. \
      • If a "smart" podium is being used, the volume should be controlled from the podium.
      • If external speakers are required, they should be located at the front of the class near the projection screen since this is a more natural (less distracting) location for the listener.

    Other details such as corkboards, power/data floor box size, ventilation specifications, and required room temperature for equipment should be addressed.

IV. Computer Labs

Computer labs are facilities in which computing resources are available to students, faculty, and/or staff outside of class. "Discipline-specific" computer labs are typically owned, operated, and maintained by an academic department or college, may restrict access to selected groups (majors, minors, faculty, etc.), and may be used for classroom instruction. "Open" computer labs are available to any Missouri State student, faculty, or staff member, are operated by Computer Services and the Library, and are not used for classroom instruction.

The design of a computer lab must involve the owner of the lab.  All design decisions should support the primary function of serving student computing needs.

Funding of the equipment to be housed in a computer lab can come from a variety of sources and, thus, may or may not be included in the building construction budget. Coordinate funding discussions with the Chief Information Officer during the design phase.

  1. Funding

    Funding of the equipment to be housed within computer labs may or may not be part of the  budget. This determination needs to be made at the start of any project. Lifecycle funding must be considered and resolved regardless of the initial funding source. Given the rapid obsolescence of computing and networking technologies, it is imperative that funding responsibilities and funding streams be identified prior to project implementation.

  2. Electrical Power and Data Networks

    Ample power and data network ports must be provided in the proper locations. Locations should not be based on the furniture plans supplied by the architect unless the actual furniture to be purchased matches the plans. The University unit responsible for specifying and/or ordering the classroom furniture should be consulted to determine actual furniture layout. All electrical power/data locations should be based on the actual furniture to be purchased and installed. Consideration must be given to how power and network cables will be run within the furniture. Design should provide one data port and one duplex electrical outlet (two plugs) for every networked device in the classroom.

  3. Computers

    All lab equipment specifications are to be coordinated through the Office of Information Technology for review and approval. This process will ensure that lab equipment adheres to all applicable University guidelines and standards. Since funding of this equipment comes from various sources, other units may need to be involved in this process depending on the budget.

    The location of CPU's must be considered. If these are set on the table, they tend to consume desktop space and block the students' view. If set on the floor, they can be easily kicked/damaged or may prevent the chair from rolling up to the table. The use of under-table racks is strongly recommended since they may reduce damage to the CPU and will provide additional desktop space to the student.

    Each open computer lab should provide at least one station that will accommodate a disabled student.  This includes providing the following items:

    • Adjustable table
    • 21" computer monitor
    • Internal voice synthesizer card
    • Ergonomic keyboard

    The actual configuration of the workstation and location within the lab is to be determined by the Assistive Technology Support Specialist in conjunction with Disability Support Services.

  4. Furniture

    Tables hosting computers should have keyboard trays. A minimum of 3 feet of horizontal table space is strongly recommended per computer station. (Thus, use 6-foot tables rather than 5-foot tables when putting two computers side-by-side.) The 3-foot minimum will provide students with adequate tabletop space for other materials and will allow use of the keyboard trays without the mouse pads interfering with each other. Use the types of keyboard trays that will raise and lower so wheelchairs can get under the trays.

    Based on the recommendation from Disability Support Services, an adjustable table may be required for the assistive technology workstations.

  5. Room Design/Layout

    Within discipline-specific computer labs (where instruction sometimes occurs), the assistive technology workstation should be located in the center of the front row (if sufficient space is available for wheelchair access). Visually impaired students typically prefer a location in the front row so that they can more easily see the instructor and other activities at the front of the class. Give consideration to room lighting - screen glare should be reduced as much as possible.

  6. Security System

    A security system is required for all computer labs. If the lab will be staffed at all open times, then only door sensors and motion detectors are required. If the room will not be staffed at all open times, then the equipment should be laced with a fiber optic cable that is always armed. For more information, see the chapter entitled "Security Systems" within this document.

    Please note that the layout of the room does impact the security system costs if a fiber lacing system is to be used. In general, longer rows of workstations are less expensive to lace than short rows. The cost differential can be significant and, thus, must be considered.

  7. Other items for consideration:
    • A 6' x 3' cork bulletin board should be included in each lab as well as a 10' marker board.
    • Printers should be located near the lab monitor (if there is a location for the lab monitor).
    • For an open lab, the need for an office for the lab User Support Specialist and, the location of that office, should be determined by the lab owner. A window should be provided in the office to aid in monitoring of the lab.  The office should be capable of being locked.
    • A location should be provided for the display of printed materials.
    • For an open lab, a location may be required for computer account distribution.
    • Indirect lighting should be used to eliminate, or at least reduce, glare.
    • Raised flooring is preferred for computer labs but is expensive. Carpeting provides a quieter environment but does not wear well in high-use areas.

V. Network Infrastructure

Networking considerations within facilities include designing and installing the wiring plant to support voice, data, and video communications; ensuring the appropriate telecommunications equipment is provided; and providing the appropriate locations for the infrastructure equipment to be housed.

Wiring infrastructure and network electronics costs are to be included as part of the building project. If not included in the building budget, a funding source is to be identified prior to starting the project. Including Information Services at the start of the design process will ensure that these important components are included in the project's total design and cost.

The West Plains and Mountain Grove campuses will coordinate all network infrastructure activity through the Springfield campus.

    1. Wiring

      The design of the wiring plant includes providing the appropriate connectivity, both to the facility and within the facility. Wire and wireless solutions will be considered and the optimal configuration within budget will be selected.

      Wiring cost estimates will be provided by the Director of Networking and Telecommunications upon receipt of a conceptualized plan indicating desired services. The Director of Communication Services will work with the on-campus technicians from Computer Services and the University's contracted wiring/telecommunications vendor to determine a cost estimate. Wiring is assumed to be plenum-rated cable unless otherwise specified. Provide lead time of at least two weeks to ensure a more accurate cost estimate can be provided.

      Wiring materials and installation on all Missouri State campuses will be provided by the University's contracted vendor to ensure quality standards are enforced. Approval from the Office of Information Technology is required to divert from this policy.

      Getting Wiring To a Facility:

      Contact the Director of Communication Services anytime digging will occur to prevent damage to existing cable plant.

      Contact the Director of Communication Services to determine wiring conduit needs in the ground. Minimum conduit depth is 36 inches. Communications Services normally requires that chat be used to cover underground conduit with marker tape on top of the chat. Occasionally, depending upon the location of the conduit, a concrete cap may be used to cover the wiring. This will be determined on a case-by-case basis by Communication Services.

      Wiring Within Facilities:

      "J" hooks are preferred over cable trays in almost all cases. "J" hooks should be installed in an accessible area and be placed in the most direct route to high concentrations of voice and data outlets.

      Wireless solutions will be considered and subjected to a cost/benefit analysis based on connectivity requirements. Networking and Telecommunications and the Networking Administrator will determine whether a wireless solution is feasible and appropriate.

    2. Voice Network and Telephone Systems

      The Director of Communication Services is the primary contact and is responsible for providing cost estimates and design criteria, and coordinating the implementation and testing of voice/telephone systems.

      Communication Services will work with the intended occupants to determine the following:

      • Locations for pay telephone(s).
      • Locations for TDD telephone(s) (based on recommendation from Disability Support Services).
      • Locations for campus escort telephone(s).

Communication Services will indicate these items on the building plans and provide feedback to Planning, Design & Construction. Planning, Design & Construction will locate all departmental phones on the plans. >Communication Services will work with the department to determine which locations should be activated.

Cost estimates will be provided by the Director of Communication Services upon receipt of plans indicating desired services. The Director of Communication Services will work with the on-campus technicians from Computer Services and the University's contracted on-campus telecommunications provider to determine a cost estimate. To provide the most accurate cost estimates, provide lead time of at least two weeks.

  1. Data Network

    The Networking Administrator within Computer Services is responsible for designing and troubleshooting the intra-building network infrastructure and coordinating the installation of the infrastructure equipment. The Director of Communication Services is responsible for coordinating the installation of wiring.

    Networking and Telecomunications and the Computer Services Networking staff will work with intended occupants to identify the location of data ports, data network speeds, and indicate this information on plans. Occupants must identify the ports to be activated upon opening of the building. Where conduit is made available, data network wiring can be pulled at a later date at the same cost.

    As classrooms are constructed/remodeled, one data port will be provided at the instructor's station. Location will be determined by the Head of Media Services as part of the classroom technologies design process.

    By default, each employee office will receive one data port. Exceptions will be accommodated based on need.

    Anywhere vending machines will be located, include conduit to wire for BearPass Card services.

    Anywhere BearPass Card door access readers are desired, include conduit for BearPass Card wiring.

    Note: BearPass Card door access readers are not considered true security devices. Safety and Transportation is to be consulted regarding facility security system requirements and solution design.

    Anywhere BearPass Card copy readers are desired, include conduit for BearPass Card wiring. This includes the locations for photocopiers.

    Note: Building project budgets will not include the cost of BearPass Card wiring, equipment, or installation. These costs, if incurred, must be covered by the requesting department. BearPass Card door access readers cannot make use of magnets to lock the doors. Electric strikes will be required for operation of these systems. The items just mentioned should be considered early in the design process. A funding source for BearPass Card devices or services must be identified prior to the start of the project.

    If public access data ports are being provided, the cost for signage should be included in the project. These signs should be 4"x4" wall signs with "Data Network Port" in raised lettering. Locate a duplex electrical outlet next to the data port.

  2. Telecommunication Equipment Closets

    Information Services {we will decide who} will provide Planning, Design & Construction with a detailed list of equipment to be housed in each telecommunications closet and the heat specifications of each. This will allow the architects to properly design the HVAC system to maintain appropriate environmental conditions in within the closet.

    Entrance Wiring Closets

    The entrance wiring closet (EWC), will be located in the basement of the building it serves. In the absence of a basement, it will be on the ground floor.

    All cables entering the building will be terminated in this room and the appropriate methods for high voltage protection will be applied. Electronic equipment associated with video and data interconnectivity will more than likely also be situated in this room. The EWC will be the focal point of all communications facilities and resources in the building. It is imperative that the EWC be an enclosed area secure from flooding and accidental damage, as well as sabotage.

    Considerations for the room are floor weight load factors, water avoidance, lighting, electrical access, room size, electrical grounding, HVAC, and location near the building entrance facility.

    • General
      The room designated to be an EWC must be dedicated exclusively to that purpose. Access to the room should be direct without passing through other secure areas that would require additional keys for access. Conversely, access to the EWC should not be required in order to access another area. It should not be shared with any other use such as storage, janitorial equipment or other electrical or mechanical installations. There should not be any plumbing fixtures in the room and pipes should not pass through, or above, the room that could cause flooding or require repair or replacement.
    • Floor
      The floor must be free of dust and static electricity. The floor should be tiled instead of carpeted. If the floor is left uncovered, it must be sealed and should be painted. The floor must be high enough to avoid any threat of flooding and have a minimum floor loading specification of at least 100 pounds per square foot.
    • Ceiling
      The ceiling should be a minimum of 8 feet, 6 inches high. There should not be a false ceiling, however, an access panel should be installed.
    • Walls
      The walls should be lined with ¾ inch, 4-foot by 8-foot plywood attached to the wall framing members or mechanically attached to the masonry walls. It is recommended that all surfaces be painted with fire resistant paint.
    • Doors
      Doorways should be a minimum of 36 inches wide by 6 feet 8 inches high. Doors should be hinged outward and solid to provide security and resistance to fire. The door locks should be cored so that they will allow access only by key and should be self-locking.
    • Lighting
      Lighting should be provided to a minimum level of 540 lx (50 foot candles) measured 3 feet above the floor. Light fixtures should be mounted a minimum of 8 feet, 6 inches above the floor.
    • Electrical
      A 20 amp, 110 volt AC separately fused electrical circuit should be provided for electronic equipment. This circuit shall be extended to a power strip mounted on the plywood or on an equipment rack if one is provided for the room.
    • Grounding
      A minimum of 6 AWG ground conductor from the main building grounding electrode and the power neutral shall be provided. It shall also be terminated on a copper ground bar properly installed in the room.
    • HVAC
      HVAC provisioning shall be sufficient to provide a minimum of 6 air changes per hour. The temperature should be maintained at 55 F to 80 F 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Care must be taken to not include the room in a zone that could have heating, air conditioning, or air exchange reduced during night or idle times, as the equipment will generate the same amount of heat at all times.
    • Location
      A building should have only one EWC regardless of the building size. It should be located as close as possible to the point where telecommunications facilities enter the building while being centrally located to reduce the lengths of backbone cables.
    • Size
      The minimum size for an EWC is 6 feet by 9 feet, but that size room will satisfy the needs of a building of up to 200,000 square feet of gross floor space.
    Floor Wiring Closets

    The floor wiring closet (FWC) is the second type of room required. Backbone cables from the EWC are terminated here as station cables. Pairs in these cables are connected in this room to establish continuous electrical paths from rooms/desktops to other rooms/desktops, and to communication devices. Electronic devices associated with the exchange of data and/or video information will also be situated in these FWCs.

    The FWC should have an exclusive location on each floor to facilitate the electronics and cabling distribution for the floor. If the floor is large enough, with long cable runs, more than one room may be required on each floor. Security requires that the room not be shared with other building functions. Considerations for the facility are floor loading factors, water avoidance, ceilings and walls, fire door, lighting, electrical access, room size, electrical grounding, HVAC, floor location, and cable run maximum lengths.

    • General
      The room designated to be a FWC must be dedicated exclusively to that purpose. Access to the room should be direct without passing through other secure areas that would require additional keys for access. Conversely, access to the FWC should not be required in order to access another area. It should not be shared with any other use such as storage, janitorial equipment or other electrical or mechanical installations. There should not be any plumbing fixtures in the room and pipes should not pass through, or over, the room that could cause flooding or require repair or replacement. 
    • Floor
      The floor must be free of dust and static electricity. The floor should be tiled instead of carpeted. If the floor is left uncovered, it must be sealed and should be painted. The floor must be high enough to avoid any threat of flooding and have a minimum floor loading specification of 50 pounds per square foot.
    • Ceiling
      The ceiling should be a minimum of 8 feet, 6 inches high. In addition, there should not be a false ceiling, however, an access panel should be installed.
    • Walls
      The walls should be lined with ¾ inch, 4-foot by 8-foot plywood attached to the wall framing members or mechanically attached to the masonry walls. It is recommended that all surfaces be painted with fire resistant paint.
    • Doors
      Doorways should be a minimum of 36 inches wide by 6 feet, 8 inches high. Doors should be hinged outward and solid to provide security and resistance to fire. The door locks should be cored so that they will allow access only by key and should be self-locking.
    • Lighting
      Lighting should be provided to a minimum level of 540 lx (50 foot candles) measured 3 feet above the floor. Light fixtures should be mounted a minimum of 8 feet 6 inches, above the floor.
    • Electrical
      A 20 amp, 110 volt AC separately fused electrical circuit shall be provided for power strips. Additional outlets for tools, test instruments and work lights shall be placed at least at 6-foot intervals around the room.
    • Grounding
      A minimum of a 6 AWG ground conductor from the main building grounding electrode and the power neutral shall be provided. It shall also be terminated on a copper ground bar properly installed in the room.
    • HVAC
      HVAC provisioning shall be sufficient to provide a minimum of four (4) air changes per hour. The temperature should be maintained at 55 F to 80 F 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Care must be taken to not include the room in a zone that could have heating, air conditioning or air exchange reduced during night or idle times as the equipment will generate the same quantity of heat at all times.
    • Location
      Each floor must have at least one FWC. Additional FWC's may be required to meet maximum limits for station cable lengths defined below. FWC's should be located in the center of the area to be served. In multi-floored buildings, FWC's should be located directly above each other ("stacked") to minimize the lengths of backbone cables, thus reducing the lengths of circuits between floors in the building.

      The FWC should be located in such a way that the average station cable length is 150 feet or less, and no individual station cable exceeds 295 feet in length.
    • Size
      The recommended FWC room size should be a minimum of 6 feet by 9 feet. Special circumstances could allow a smaller space.
    Vertical Distribution

    Power and data/communications cabling system resources are distributed vertically via backbone cables in one or more building shafts to the floors where they will be used. Vertically aligned closets with connecting conduit is preferred, but if necessary can be connected with sleeves or slots. Ensure that proper fire stopping is maintained.

    Backbone shafts are either open or closed. Closed backbone shafts are vertically aligned closets on each floor connected by pipe sleeves or conduit through the floors. They have different fire code requirements than open-shaft systems, but they may be more versatile.

    Open cable shafts (large openings in flooring not constrained by pipe sleeves or conduit) can also be used, when available, where large quantities of cables are required on a floor that is distant from the main equipment room. Ensure that proper fire stopping is maintained.

    • Backbone Raceways
      Backbone raceways are a series of accesses that connect EWCs to FWCs. These paths permit cable to be placed between the floors. They may be slots, sleeves, conduits, or rings in which cables may be routed for support and protection. Considerations are the size, quantity, and seals. If conduits or sleeves are used, the 4-inch size is preferred.
    • Design
      When wiring closets are located above each other, sleeves or slots may be used. When they are so situated, conduits should be utilized to provide security and physical protection to the cables.
    • Size
      The size of sleeves or conduits can be stated as one since sleeves will probably be made of pieces of conduit placed through the floor. A minimum of 4-inch conduits should be used. If space limitations prevent the use of 4-inch conduits then the number of 3-inch ducts provided should be doubled or if 2-inch ducts are used the number should be increased four fold.
    • Quantity
      A minimum of one 4-inch conduit or sleeve should be provided per FWC plus two spares. Actual quantity required per project will be determined by Communications Services and communicated to Planning, Design & Construction.
    • Seals
      All conduits should be provided with seals until used to prevent the entrance of gases. Sleeves and slots should be sealed with fire stop material to prevent the spread of fire.
    Horizontal Distribution (from closet to station)

    On each floor, power and data/communications cabling system resources are distributed horizontally through either the ceiling or the floor. Ceiling systems use metal conduit, raceways, and/or flexible conduit cable assemblies to distribute power and data/communications wiring in the plenum, or the space between a finished dropped or hung ceiling and the floor above. The preferred method is to place "J" hooks in an accessible area and in the most direct route to high concentrations of voice/data outlets. If the ceiling is an air-plenum ceiling, cable must be routed through conduit or must be fire-rated.

    Other points that must be considered

    Equipment rack installation should be coordinated with Networking and Telecommunications and Computer Services so that the most appropriate racks can be purchased.

    Security of room and key requirements. The University prefers not to share space with Maintenance for the sake of security. If a substantial amount of equipment will be housed, then a separate closet is warranted. All telecommunications closets should be keyed alike in the same building and should be the same as the most common telecommunications closet lock across campus.

VI. Computing Infrastructure

If one or more servers will be required in a facility, Computer Services should be consulted regarding the most appropriate location for these servers. In some instances, it may be advantageous to house the server(s) within the facility; in other instances, it may be advantageous to house the server(s) within the central Computer Services server farm. Issues such as physical security, network load balancing, environmental conditions, and backup requirements will influence this decision and must be considered.

  1. Electronic Directories and Kiosks

    Computer Services should be consulted if the facility is to house an electronic building directory or an electronic kiosk.

VII. Security Systems

Rooms containing computers, printers, or other mobile, high-tech equipment may require a security system. Computer-equipped (three or more computers) classrooms and Computer labs require a security system. Safety and Transportation should be consulted for a recommendation.

If a room contains this type of equipment and will be monitored during all open hours, then the following system is recommended:

  • Door sensors
  • Motion detector (if there is a mode of entry other than a door, such as a window)
    • Fiber optic "lacing" system routed through all susceptible equipment items.
    • Fill out a PPA request form and submit it to Planning, Design & Construction.
    • Planning, Design & Construction will contact Safety and Transportation, who will work with the requestor and the contractor in selecting the system.
    • Once a satisfactory design and cost from the current contract is determined, Planning, Design & Construction will issue a requisition for the installation of the system.

If a room contains a substantial amount of equipment, but will not be monitored during all open hours, then the following system is recommended:

Note: No door sensors or motion detectors are required in conjunction with the "lacing" system unless the desire is to keep vandals from doing other types of damage to the room. The alarm will be activated once the fiber optic cable is severed, so the equipment cannot be removed without activating the alarm. This type of system will not activate, however, when someone enters the room.

Note:
All equipment locations should be verified prior to installation of the lacing system since relocating equipment is difficult and costly once the lacing system has been installed.

The University has a contract with a security system vendor. The person responsible for coordinating the installation should do the following:

Installation of a security system that is to be centrally monitored will require that a telephone line be installed from the security system control panel to the Safety Office's central monitoring equipment. Ensure that this line is ordered from Networking and Telecommunications once the control panel location has been determined within the room. Since reaction time is based on current demand, provide Telecommunications with at least two weeks of lead time to get this line installed.

Coordinate actual keypad and transformer locations within the room. If feasible, ensure that all keypads are located on the same "level" as other wall-mounted devices (thermostats, etc.) for aesthetic purposes. Ensure that all outlet-connected transformers are not installed in high-traffic or high-visibility areas. Keypads should not be located within view through a window. All keypad-controlled systems must have access codes and these access codes must be communicated to Safety and Transportation and Custodial Services. Security system keypads are not to be located where individuals outside the room can easily see them through windows in the walls or doors.

{We will add a section describing what BearPass Card door access readers can, and cannot, do}

VIII. Facility Access During Construction Installation

Planning, Design & Construction will coordinate building and room access for vendors who have contracts through them. They will handle the issuance of temporary keys and, if necessary, the establishment of temporary security system access codes as required. Vendors contracted directly by another University unit must coordinate access with Safety and Transportation.

Appendix A: Contacts

Administrative and Information Services
Carrington Hall 104
AdministrationandFinance@missouristate.edu

Computer Services
Cheek 164
ComputerServices@missouristate.edu

Networking and Telecommunications
Blair Shannon 103
CommunicationServices@missouristate.edu

Planning, Design & Construction
Burgess House
DesignandContstruction@missouristate.edu

Facilities Management
Stores and Maintenance
FacilitiesManagement@missouristate.edu

Safety and Transportation
744 E. Cherry
Safety@missouristate.edu

Distance Learning and Instructional Technology Center
Meyer Alumni Center, Suite 400
dlit@missouristate.edu

Appendix B: Glossary

Niemeyer Podium

A good description of a Niemeyer podium is as follows:

"Dr. Daniel Niemeyer has designed and installed "Smart Classrooms" at the University of Colorado. The technology is simple to use; small signs near the equipment tell a faculty member all they need to know. A small lectern (22" x 14" top) with room volume control, power, sound jack, network jack, and projector jack is available in rooms that have projectors installed. The video tape player is in a corner cabinet near the podium, and controls for the video equipment and projector are at eye level. The classroom use front-to-back zoned lighting with parabolic lenses. Directed incandescent lighting provides good illumination of the instructor, class, and chalkboard while the projector is in use. Dr. Niemeyer has included tried and true media, such as slide and overhead projectors, into his design. He has modeled both the capital and operational costs of various levels of technology classrooms. Most importantly, his classrooms start from an instructor's perspective." [1]

For more information about this topic, see the chapter entitled "Classroom Media and Instructor Control Systems" within this document.

[1]Joel A. Cohen, Ph.D., Director of Information Technology Services, Mark H. Castner, Assistant Director of Information Technology Services for User Services, Canisius College, Technology and Classroom Design: A Faculty Perspective

Appendix C: Design Alternatives

Keyboard Trays

The University has received complaints about the use of keyboard trays. Some users have found difficulty in retracting the tray as well as restricted walkways when trays have not been retracted. The use of alternate keyboard positioning may be desired.