Job Family 3 Job Evaluation Plan

MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY

OFFICE OF HUMAN RESOURCES

JOB EVALUATION MANUAL
4/23/2007

Revised 9/5/07, removed old factors III and IV

11/5/07, added job evaluation points
 
This guide describes the point-factor job evaluation system used to evaluate those individuals working in computing, information systems, and other information service jobs at Missouri State University.
                                     
JOB FAMILY 3
Computer Programmers and Operators, Information Systems Employees, Electronic and Media System Technicians, Broadcast Engineers, and other Technical or Computer-related Jobs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

This job evaluation plan incorporates some compensable factors, factor definitions, degree level descriptions, and other language included in and/or derived from the Department of Labor’s Guide for Evaluating Your Firm’s Jobs and Pay and the Office of Personnel Management’s Introduction to Position Classification Standards. Complete citations can be found below:

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2003). National compensation survey: Guide for evaluating your firm’s jobs and pay (DOL Publication).                 Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

U.S. Office of Personnel Management. (1995). Introduction to the position classification standards (Publication No. TS-134). Washington,         D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Job Family 3: Educational and Experience Equivalencies Chart

This is a factor with 13 scale points developed through the use of a grid incorporating both educational requirements for the job and general work experience. This equivalencies grid approach explicitly recognizes that for many jobs, experience and education can act as substitutes for each other.

Specific job requirements may limit the application of this chart. For example, a specific job might require a minimum of five years of experience and not allow an educational equivalent. Another job might require a specific college degree and not allow an experience equivalent. Both jobs would be at factor level 6 regardless whether or not the equivalency was allowed. In other words, this chart allows equivalencies to exist, but does not require them for all jobs where job requirements do not make it possible.
 
Factor Levels for Educational and Experience Requirements of the Job
           
A. Educational
Requirements
of the Job

B. Experience Requirements for the Job

 

1. None

2. One
Year
3. Two
Years
4. Three
Years
5. Four
Years
6. Five
Years
7. Six
Years Plus

1. Primary - HS diploma or equiv.

1
197 pts
2
394 pts
3
591 pts
4
788 pts
5
985 pts
6
1182 pts
7
1379 pts

2. Primary Voc.

HS + 30 hrs

2
394 pts
3
591 pts
4
788 pts
5
985 pts
6
1182 pts
7
1379 pts
8
1576 pts

3. Advanced Voc.

HS + 30-60

3
591 pts
4
788 pts
5
985 pts
6
1182 pts
7
1379 pts
8
1576 pts
9
1773 pts

4. Specialized

Assoc. Deg. (60+)

4
788 pts
5
985 pts
6
1182 pts
7
1379 pts
8
1576 pts
9
1773 pts
10
1970 pts

5. Primary Prof.

NS Coll. Deg.

5
985 pts
6
1182 pts
7
1379 pts
8
1576 pts
9
1773 pts
10
1970 pts
11
2167 pts

6. Professional

Prof. Deg.

6
1182 pts
7
1379 pts
8
1576 pts
9
1773 pts
10
1970 pts
11
2167 pts
12
2364 pts

7. Advanced Prof.

Masters Deg.

7
1379 pts
8
1576 pts
9
1773 pts
10
1970 pts
11
2167 pts
12
2364 pts
13
2561 pts
 

Job Family 3, Factor Ia: Educational Requirements of the Job

Formal educational and vocational training required including, secondary, vocational, and college courses necessary in order to perform the job at an acceptable level.

1. Primary. The job requires a high school diploma or equivalent.

2. Primary Vocational. The job requires a high school diploma or equivalent, and up to one year (30 credit hours) of technical training, certification and/or vocational classes or course work in a specialized area.

3. Advanced Vocational. The job requires a high school diploma or equivalent and more than one year and up to two years (more than 30 but less than 60 credit hours) of college in specific and/or specialized courses or equivalent vocational training.

4. Specialized. The job requires a high school diploma or equivalent and an Associate’s degree (60 credit hours or more).

5. Primary Professional. The job requires a four-year college degree in a non-technical area or non-specific area.

6. Professional. The job requires a college degree in a business or technical area or a four-year degree with specific classes in a specialized or technical area.

7. Advanced Professional. The job requires completion of a Master’s degree.
                                               

Job Family 3, Factor Ib: Experience Requirements

The minimum amount of job-related experience that is necessary in order to perform the job at an acceptable level.

1. None. The job requires no previous work experience, or a limited degree of experience which can be acquired in less than one year.

2. One Year. The job requires sufficient job knowledge to necessitate at least one year of experience performing similar or related duties.

3. Two Years. The job requires considerable knowledge to necessitate at least two years of experience performing similar or related duties.

4. Three Years. The job requires moderate job knowledge to necessitate three years of experience performing similar or related duties.

5. Four Years. The job requires moderately extensive job knowledge to necessitate four years of experience performing similar or related duties.

6. Five Years. The job requires extensive job knowledge to necessitate at least five years of experience performing similar or related duties.

7. Six Years Plus. The job requires extensive specialized job knowledge to necessitate six or more years of experience performing similar or related duties.

 
Job Family 3, Factor II:Supervisory Responsibility
 
The degree of supervisory responsibility required by the job, defined by the extent of supervisory responsibilities required by the job and the types and numbers of employees being supervised.
 
When evaluating jobs using this factor consider:
  • The range of managerial/supervisory tasks performed. Higher levels require a full range of managerial/supervisory tasks, including performance management and dealing with employee rights and responsibilities.
  • The number and level of employees supervised. The higher levels of this factor involve managing employees who are supervisors of other employees or who perform more highly skilled work. At higher levels, more time is spent on managerial/supervisory work and less time is spent on operational activities.

Factor levels include:

1. 299 points: Little or no supervisory responsibility for work of others. 

2. 598 points: Irregular but occasional responsibility to direct the work of student workers and/or temporary or part-time workers. At this level are jobs in which the incumbent may be asked to supervise small numbers of student workers, graduate assistants or part-time employees, but the supervisory work is irregular or infrequent. The nature of supervision is largely confined to assigning tasks to others and does not include a full range of supervisory responsibilities.

3. 897 points: Regular but limited supervision and training of small numbers of student or part-time workers is required where the nature of supervision is largely confined to scheduling work or assigning tasks. Supervision at this level may also involve directing the work assignments of one or more permanent, full-time employees, but supervision typically does not include a full range of supervisory responsibilities, and supervisory duties typically do not consume a large portion of the work day. Characteristic of this level would be employees who direct student workers or work team leaders who act as working supervisors.

4. 1196 points: Supervision of a work group including hiring, training, planning and directing the work of employees. At this level the job often requires close supervision of a rather small number of permanent employees, and/or small numbers of part-time workers, graduate assistants and/or student workers performing relatively complicated technical or skilled work, and/or other groups of employees at a similar level. At this level, it is frequently necessary to train and instruct others, and to plan and direct work. Supervisory responsibilities consume moderate amounts of work time, and may include general work planning tasks. Most first-line supervisors or office managers are typically at this level.

5. 1495 points: Supervision of a work group or department, including hiring, training, disciplining and directing work of others. At this level, the required supervision will likely include general rather than close supervision of others. Typically, the nature of the work may involve the supervision of other supervisors or team or work group leaders, the responsibility for a rather large group of operative employees in non-technical or non-highly skilled areas, or supervision of moderate to large numbers of student workers who perform relatively complicated technical or skilled work. At this level, supervisory responsibilities consume significant amounts of work time and include substantial responsibility for work planning responsibilities.

6. 1794 points: Supervision of a departmental work group involving highly skilled technical or complicated work. Supervision at this level involves the direction of skilled work, specialized tasks, or work of a complicated nature. This level is typical for managers who supervise other supervisors or a large group of paraprofessional or professional permanent employees in technical and skilled areas. Supervision at this level includes a full range of supervisory responsibilities, including the responsibility for staffing and performance management, as well as budgeting and planning functions.

7. 2093 points: General administration of a large unit of employees where the nature of the managerial work involves providing general direction for other supervisory personnel. Managers at this level have substantial responsibility for the operation of a unit including responsibility for the budgeting process, budgetary and inventory control, purchasing, and regulatory compliance, as well as administrative authority over staffing issues and disciplinary outcomes. General administrative work, rather than direct supervision of others, takes up rather large portions of work time

 
Job Family 3, Factor III (formerly Factor V):  Skill, Complexity and Technical Mastery
 
Technical and specialized skills one must possess in order to adequately perform the job. This includes an understanding of specific procedures, steps, practices, concepts and techniques, and the required skill or ability to apply these procedures, practices and techniques. The specific skills required for the job, including operating computers, designing, installing and operating computer systems and software, and operating office machines, audio/video and similar equipment.
 
The examples provided below the factor descriptions are specific procedures, steps, practices, concepts and techniques that are consistent with the skill requirements required by the factor. The job does not necessarily need to exist to perform the specific procedures, steps, practices, concepts and techniques in the examples so long as the skill, complexity and technical mastery required by the job is equivalent to those required by the examples.
 
For levels 5, 6 and 7, the job evaluator can assign interpolate scores for jobs whose skill, complexity and technical mastery requirements fall between two levels.
 
1. 1400 points: The job requires knowledge and/or technical skills that allow the employee to perform a limited variety of simple, repetitive tasks. Knowledge of basic or commonly used measurement or calibration techniques, tools, methods, procedures or operations requiring some previous training or experience including the ability to use basic tools and the ability to understand basic instructions is required.

2. 700 points: The job requires knowledge of standard procedures and tests related to a technical area. Requires basic mechanical and/or technical aptitude, a general knowledge of procedures and operations and/or the ability to operate basic tools or office equipment that typically requires some previous experience or training. Characteristic knowledge, skills and abilities include:

  • Basic computer literacy
  • Knowledge of basic computer operation and keyboarding
  • Ability to use basic application software.

Alternatively, knowledge of a body of standardized rules, materials, processes, procedures, operations and tools necessary to fabricate, install, repair, maintain, set-up, adjust or operate equipment, physical systems or devices requiring considerable training and experience to perform the full range of standard assignments and resolve recurring problems is required.
 
3. 1000 points: The job requires knowledge of few basic information technology terms and methods, such as those acquired through on-the-job training in one or more simple work processes. Knowledge permits the employee to carry out a variety of related and recurring assignments that can be quickly mastered. This may include:
  • Setting up user network access and instructing new end-users in implementing e-mail and word processing procedures
  • Assisting remote entry users in solving simple problems associated with terminal or tie-line malfunctions or in following written procedures
  • Initializing and backing-up a local area network according to instruction
  • Coding portions of simple application programs and documenting program changes using detailed specifications
Alternatively, knowledge of the processes, methods, and procedures associated with a limited range of technical objectives or common problems, or knowledge of an extensive body of standard rules, procedures, processes, operations, tools or equipment requiring extended training and experience to perform a wide variety of interrelated and nonstandard tasks and resolve a wide range of problems. Knowledge permits the employee to carry out a variety of related and recurring assignments that can be quickly mastered is required. This may include:
  • Preparing layouts and drawings according to specifications using CAD software
  • Set-up and operation of moderately complex equipment
  • Diagnosis, repair and maintenance of complex equipment
4. 1300 points: The job requires knowledge of information technology such as could be acquired through experience or classroom-based course work in either vendor-focused or technology specific training such as Oracle, HTML, Java, or Extensible Markup Language. Knowledge permits employee to carry out routine assignments and to gain familiarity with the operating systems, equipment, software and business goals of the University. Examples include:
  • Developing websites for an interactive distance learning system
  • Responding to requests to identify and solve recurring end-user problems associated with a local area network (LAN)
  • Installing and testing central processing unit upgrades, peripheral devices and new software
  • Configuring and installing a group of individual computer workstations in accordance with a few standard patterns
Alternatively, knowledge of established processes, methods, and techniques, as well as practical knowledge of a few specific technical and scientific principles is required. Alternatively, advanced knowledge of a skilled trade to solve unusually complex problems is required. Knowledge permits the employee to schedule and carry out the steps of a limited operation or project, or to complete important stages in a multi-step project. Examples include:
  • Solving electro-mechanical and electronic problems such as those related to AC/DC converters, data processors, digital controllers, and shared data transmitting devices
  • Fabrication or assembly of miniature parts where precise control and delicate touch are required
5. 1600 points: The job requires knowledge of information technology methods and procedures applicable to several types of work processes. Knowledge permits the employee to carry out work assignments where the objectives are clearly identified and can be accomplished by adapting precedents and established practices. Examples include:
  • Maintaining and modifying a group of utility programs
  • Developing code, tests, debugs, and documents applications where specifications set forth features such as interface requirements, inputs, and outputs
  • Monitoring a local area network (LAN), making minor adjustments and maintaining the system
  • Customizing applications using off-the-shelf software
5+.1750 points: The job requires skill, complexity and technical mastery somewhat above the requirements for Level 5, but somewhat below the skill, complexity and technical mastery requirements for Level 6.
 
6. 1900 points: The job requires advanced knowledge of a wide range of information technology methods and procedures, including those regarding systems life cycles and systems application development. Knowledge permits the employee to plan and carry out a variety of assignments, modify standard practices, solve diverse software and hardware problems and adapt precedents to accommodate specialized requirements and meet a wide variety of business objectives. This might include:
  • Developing plans and specifications for a new multipurpose application
  • Troubleshooting software design and implementation problems
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of data security systems, procedures, and methods
  • Designing relational databases, and developing and creating data dictionaries
6+.2050 points: The job requires skill, complexity and technical mastery somewhat above the requirements for Level 6, but somewhat below the skill, complexity and technical mastery requirements for Level 7.
 
7. 2200 points: The job requires professional knowledge of the principles, concepts and specialized complicated techniques of a profession. Knowledge of a wide range of information technology methods and procedures and specialized knowledge in one or more specific functions is required. Knowledge permits the incumbent to provide authoritative advice on difficult assignments such as planning advanced systems. Skill in applying knowledge through analyzing, designing, organizing and developing major programs, systems and networks. This may include:
  • Guiding other information technology specialists regarding technical concerns
  • Advising administrators regarding new developments and techniques in the specialty area
  • Designing state-of-the-art applications
  • Leading and coordinating a team in long-term system development projects
 
7+.2350 points: The job requires skill, complexity and technical mastery somewhat above the requirements for Level 7 but somewhat below the skill, complexity, and technical mastery requirements for Level 8.
 
8. 2500 points: The job requires advanced professional mastery of the principles, concepts and specialized complicated techniques of a profession. Knowledge of the principles, emerging technical advances, and methods of a specialized area of information technology is required. Knowledge permits the employee to develop new information technology concepts or to inspire pioneering or unprecedented projects such as:
  • Formulating unprecedented concepts and methods
  • Providing staff advice and leadership for the development and implementation of innovative technical information and/or security systems
  • Devising innovative computer applications.
 
Job Family 3, Factor IV (formerly Factor VI): Budgetary Control
 
The responsibility required by the job for budgets and financial controls.
 
1. 193 points: Jobs at this level involve no budgetary control, except for the normal responsibilities associated with monitoring and reporting everyday expenses.
 
2. 386 points: Individuals in jobs at this level actively document, monitor and control expenditures. At this level, incumbents may recommend minor expenditures, but have no real authority over budgets.
 
3. 579 points: Jobs at this level are responsible for identifying areas of need and for developing proposals that request funding to fulfill those needs.
 
4. 772 points: At this level would be jobs in which the incumbent has the responsibility for exercising the primary control over a limited budget, including developing budgets and distributing budgetary funds.
 
 
Job Family 3, Factor V (formerly Factor VII): Work Environment and Physical Demands
 
This factor involves discomforts in the physical surroundings of the workplace and the physical demands required by the job, including requirements for strength and lifting, agility and exertion required. When assessing this factor, consider:
  • The intensity of the physical effort required and the magnitude of environmental discomforts. More extreme physical demands and environmental discomforts should be associated with higher factor levels.
  • The frequency of the physical effort required and duration of environmental discomfort. Continuous physical demands and ongoing exposure to environmental discomfort should be rated at a higher level than infrequent or irregular demands.
 
1. 25 points: The work environment has only everyday discomforts associated with an office or commercial vehicle. The work area is adequately lighted, heated or cooled and ventilated. Work is largely sedentary involving mostly sitting with occasional walking, standing, bending or carrying of small items. No special physical demands are required of the work.
 
2. 50 points: The work area is generally adequately lighted and ventilated, but may involve some discomfort such as the moderate noise from machines or occasional uncomfortable temperatures. The work may require some exertion, such as frequent standing, considerable walking, frequent bending, kneeling, reaching and stooping, and may include occasional lifting of moderately heavy objects. Work may require specific but common physical abilities.
 
3. 75 points: The work area involves moderate environmental discomfort, such as continuous moderate noise from machines and/or discomfort from poor ventilation or uncomfortable heat or cold. Work may require frequent moderate physical exertion including standing, climbing, crawling and heavy lifting of objects over 50 pounds.
 
4. 100 points: The work environment involves substantial discomfort due to continuous exposure to high noise levels, poor ventilation, or extremes of heat or cold. Work requires continuous strenuous physical exertion, such as climbing ladders, heavy lifting of objects over 50 pounds, crawling or crouching in restricted areas.
 
 
Job Family 3, Factor VI (formerly Factor VIII): Work Impact and Effect
 
The degree to which the work has an impact on the work of others. The work impact includes the effects of properly performed work, products or services on other activities, products, processes or services. Scope and effect considers the typical impact of work that is not performed correctly, or the impact of equipment and/or software failure, including the number of individuals or areas affected and the time involved in, and costs of, correcting improperly performed work.
 
1. 900 points: Work products or services facilitate the work of other individuals. Work activities may be complex, but normally involve addressing conventional problems or situations with established methods to supply others with information, software, or equipment they use to perform their work. Improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failures normally will directly impact the ability of other individuals to timely complete specific tasks or processes, but usually on a person-by-person basis. Although improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failures are typically noticed and corrected relatively quickly, after hours repairs are not available. While improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failures may create delays and inconvenience for specific individuals, the overall impact on the unit is minimal.
 
2. 1620 points: Work products or services impact the accuracy, reliability or acceptability of further processes or services. Work activities may be complex, but normally involve addressing conventional problems or situations with established methods to supply departments, programs, classes or units with information, software or equipment they use to perform their work. Improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failures affect performance, create delays, and/or otherwise affect the welfare of programs or individuals. While improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failures have significant effects, the effects are more often inconvenient rather than severe and impact relatively few people. Improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failures are normally correctable in the short-to-medium term with relatively minor costs and delays, but emergency repairs are typically unavailable. 

3. 2340 points: Work products or services directly impact the operation, accuracy, reliability, acceptability or design of programs, systems or equipment that affect the operation of individual departments or units. The work activity may be complex, but normally involves addressing conventional problems or situations with established methods that allow departments, programs or units to function properly. Improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failures are likely to produce significant errors and/or create delays that directly affect the ability of a department, program or unit to function properly, and the welfare of faculty, students or others that use the services and/or products of the department, program or unit. While the scope of improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failure is limited, the nature of the activity may require that emergency repairs be performed.

4. 3060 points: Work products or services directly impact the work of other professionals and/or the development and operation of programs, affect major activities across units, and/or impact the well-being of large numbers of individuals.  Typically the work is complex and may involve addressing conventional problems or situations with established methods, or resolving critical problems or developing new processes or models to address specific problems. Improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failures produce errors and delays that affect the operations and/or reputations of multiple or critical departments, programs, or units, and individuals. Improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failures may be remedied in the short to medium term, but at substantial cost of time and resources. The scope of improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failure is large, and the nature of the activity requires that emergency repairs be performed.

5. 3780 points: Work products or services directly impact the entire university system and the well-being of large numbers of individuals. Typically the work is complex and may involve addressing conventional problems or situations with established methods, or resolving critical problems or developing new processes or models to address specific problems. Improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failures produce errors and delays that affect the operations and/or reputations of the entire University. Improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failures may be remedied in the short to medium term, but at very substantial cost of time and resources. The scope of improperly performed work and/or equipment or software failure is system-wide, and the nature of the activity requires that emergency repairs be performed.

6. 4500 points: Work products or services directly impact the work of other professionals and/or the development and operation of programs, affect major activities across units, and/or impact the well-being of large numbers of individuals. Typically the work is complex, and while it may involve addressing conventional problems or situations with established methods, it is more likely to involve developing new processes or models involving the planning, development, and implementation of administrative programs. Work products or services are essential to the mission of the university and/or directly affect most departments, units and programs, and large numbers of individuals on a long-term or continuing basis. Improperly performed work results in courses of action that typically cannot be addressed in the short term, and may require a substantial commitment of University resources to remedy in a medium to long term.

 

 
Job Family 3: Job Evaluation Worksheet 4/23/2007 (revised 11/5/07)
 
Job Title:          ____________________________________________        Job Code: __________          
 
Department:     ____________________________________________Date:_________________
 
Analyst:           ____________________________________________
 

Factor Levels and Points

Factor Title

1  197                   8 1576

2 394                   9 1773
3 591                 10 1970
4 788                 11 2167
5 985                 12 2364
6 1182               13 2561
7 1379

Factor I: Educational and Experience Requirements of the Job

Comments:
 
1  299
2  598
3  897
4  1196
5  1495

6  1794

7  2093

Factor II: Supervisory Responsibility

Comments:
 
 
1   400
2   700
3   1000
4   1300
5   1600

5+  1750

6    1900

6+ 2050
7    2200

7+  2350

8    2500

Factor III (formerly Factor V): Skill, Complexity, and Technical Mastery

Comments:
 
 
 
 
 
1   193
2   386
3   579
4   772

Factor IV (formerly Factor VI): Budgetary Control

Comments:
 
 
1   25
2   50
3   75
4   100

Factor V (formerly Factor VII): Work Environment and Physical Demands

Comments:
1   900
2   1620
3   2340
4   3060
5   3780
6   4500

Factor VI (formerly Factor VIII): Work Impact, Scope, and Effect

 
 
Summary
 
Factor
Level
Points

Factor I: Educational and Experience Requirements of the Job

 
 

Factor II: Supervisory Responsibility

 
 

Factor III (V): Skill, Complexity, and Technical Mastery

 
 

Factor IV (VI): Budgetary Control

 
 

Factor V (VII): Work Environment and Physical Demands

 
 

Factor VI (VIII): Work Impact, Scope, and Effect

 
Total Point Value