Missouri State University

Why Gender Studies?

SO WHAT CAN I DO WITH A GENDER STUDIES MINOR?

A Gender Studies Minor should be considered by anyone interested in a job where a basic understanding of people and their behavior is essential.  This includes understanding the human ability to learn, modify behavior, develop a sense of self and identity, motivate, and direct oneself and others.

Gender Studies is also an excellent minor for those interested in studying patterns of gender construction within and between cultures and exploring how different societies form expectations of their members based on gender.

Undergraduates interested in graduate school will find that new critiques of traditional disciplines such as history, politics, economics, and geography are important, emerging fields of inquiry.  A Gender Studies Minor will help prepare one for graduate work in a variety of physical and social science and humanistic disciplines.

 Right to Vote

JOBS THAT SOMEONE WITH A GENDER STUDIES MINOR MIGHT CONSIDER:

Education - teaching, counseling (domestic violence, violence against children), equal-opportunity administration, community out-reach, fund-raising, and reporting/journalism.

Social and political activism, mediation, and counseling - political action groups; judicial reform; community organizations funded at the community, state, and federal level aimed at helping the underprivileged, under-represented, neglected, and abused; counseling and legal representation for cases concerning child welfare, rape, domestic violence, etc.

Business/industry - human relations, diversity counseling/hiring/negotiation/ legal services, hospice and hospital counseling.

Non-Governmental Organizations - National and International Red Cross, Peace Corps, US AID, Greenpeace, Habitat for Humanity, Salvation Army, Goodwill.

Religious organizations / community outreach - missionary, teacher, counselor, publicist, clergy, youth ministries, fund raising, community awareness.

Academics - revisionist histories and philosophies in most disciplines; regional studies programs such as for Ozarks, Appalachia, Latin America, Middle East, etc.; folk cultures; race, class, and identity issues in modern American society.