Missouri State University

CHPA 2009 Annual Report

 

College of Humanities and Public Affairs Annual Report 2009

 

College Goals: The Annual Report is structured around a set of college goals.

 

Goal 1. Employ enrollment management strategies, new marketing efforts, and enhanced
    advisement techniques to strengthen undergraduate and graduate Programs

a. Management of Overall Undergraduate and Graduate Enrollment

With the implementation of its enrollment management strategies (see below under b.), the College of Humanities and Public Affairs achieved greater than expected enrollment growth for fall 2009, both in headcounts of majors and in total SCH.  In fact, we have seen increases over fall 2008 of 1.1% and 5.8% for undergraduate and graduate SCH, respectively (+3.5% for Total SCH: 36,743/35,497).

Table 1 indicates the percentage change in undergraduate SCH from fall 2008 to fall 2009 SCH and establishes undergraduate SCH goals for fall 2010. Of particular note are the significant increases in CRM, MIL, PHI, and PLS.  The decrease in ANT is due in part to fewer sections of ANT 100. The decrease in ECO is due in part to lower demand for ECO 155/165 and the decrease in SOC is attributable to the decoupling of the major from CRM.

Table 1

Undergrad Dept/Prog

Total SCH undergrad fall 2008

Total SCH undergrad fall 2009

% change in SCH 09/08

 

SCH Goal undergrad fall 2010

% change in SCH 10/09

ANT

1859

1714

-7.8%

 

1750

+2.1%

CRM

2253

2566

+13.9%

 

2750

+7.2%

ECO

4786

4294

-10.3%

 

4400

+2.5%

HST

7324

7480

+2.1%

 

7550

+1%

MIL

337

437

+29.7%

 

470

+7.5%

PHI

2463

2709

+10%

 

2750

+1.5%

PLS

5074

5764

+13.6%

 

6000

+4.1%

REL

5170

5269

+1.9%

 

5380

+2.1%

SOC

3813

3222

-15.5%

 

3300

+2.4%

Area St.

765

909

+18.8%

 

920

+1.2%

Total

33,988

34,364

+1.1%

 

35,270

+2.6%

One further indicator of the general productivity of CHPA faculty is found in the comparison between the credit hours produced.  With 63.97% of total instruction handled by tenure/tenure eligible faculty in 2009, a comparison of 2008 to 2009 data demonstrates that there was a 4.7% increase in SCH by tenure/tenure eligible faculty while the figures for other regular faculty and supplemental faculty both went down (-3.7% and -2.5% respectively).  Table 2 provides the most recent Delaware faculty productivity scores (2008) for CHPA departments/programs. In every case the combined score is above 100.

Table 2

Dept/Program

Tenure/Ten Elig

Other Reg Fac

Supplemental Fac

Combined Score

ANT

114.73

--

162.56

102.67

CRM

94.74

92.53

73.28

102.69

ECO

117.12

120.29

207.35

133.67

HST

107.42

99.74

155.67

105.10

PHI

137.44

--

275.51

130.08

PLS

110.22

171.43

236.45

119.92

REL

135

101.59

127.92

138.98

SOC

113.46

247.56

270

171.13

 

b. Recruitment, Retention, and Marketing Initiatives

The College as a whole and each Department in CHPA has developed recruitment, retention, marketing, and access strategies that are designed to maximize potential growth and student success. 

  • All of the Departments reviewed and made plans to revise their websites with greater emphasis on ease of navigation and a clear message of the advantages of majoring in their respective discipline (see links at http://www.missouristate.edu/chpa).
  • All of the Departments worked to accommodate the needs of transfer students and direct efforts have been made to work with OTC students to insure that a smooth transition is possible.  OTC students were also involved in co-curricular activities (World Affairs Council).
  • ANT, CRM, and HST developed new accelerated masters programs to recruit our best undergraduate majors into the Masters program. PLS-Global Studies and REL already have accelerated masters programs in place and they increased their advertisement of this option for MSU as well as Evangel and Drury students.
  • CRM has developed on-line versions of nearly its entire undergraduate and graduate curriculum. This process should be complete within two years and will include an expanded set of on-line classes in summer 2010. In the meantime, but CRM and HST developed a 3 + 1 degree option to accommodate students who are able to complete both the undergraduate and graduate degree in four years.
  • PLS developed new on-line courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level and with the curricular revisions that were completed in spring 2010 they are positioned to better advertise and recruit students into their major and two graduate programs.
  • SOC advertised its new emphasis in Public Sociology (http://sociology.missouristate.edu/) and plans to increase access by offering core courses in the major on-line during summer 2010. The social capital survey developed by John Harms, Tim Knapp, and Michael Stout provides opportunities for applied research and community engagement.
  • PHI and REL have added B.S. degree options and both are in the planning stages of adding on-line versions of PHI 110 and REL 210. PHI also will offer an on-line version of PHI 513/613, Bioethics in fall 2010 that will support their major and be attractive to BIO and HPER majors.
  • In response to their external review in fall 2009, HST has begun a restructuring of its undergraduate major that will make it more distinctive and more attractive to potential majors.

The retention initiatives and recruitment efforts employed this academic year by CHPA departments/programs are projected to produce modest growth overall for fall 2010, with significant growth in nearly all of its undergraduate programs. Table 3 provides comparative data on fall 2008 and fall 2009 headcount of CHPA undergraduate majors as well as goals for fall 2010. Note that the growth in CRM and the corresponding decline in SOC are representative of the decoupling of these majors and the growing popularity of the CRM major.

                                                                                           Table 3

Undergrad Dept/Prog

Undergrad Majors fa08

% change in majors from fa08/fa09

Undergrad Majors fa09

Undergrad Majors Goal for fall 2010

% change in majors from fa10/fa09

ANT

111

+.9%

112

114

+1.8%

CRM

311

+21.8%

379

390

+2.9%

ECO

63

+1.6%

64

66

+3%

HST

299

+3%

308

310

+.6%

PHI

41

-4.9%

39

41

+5%

PLS

191

+4.7%

200

205

+2.5%

REL

65

+7.7%

70

72

+2.8%

SOC

140

-20.7%

111

115

+3.6%

TOTALS

1221

+5%

1283

1313

+2.3%

Further indicators of student success are the scores received on MFAT tests and the number of graduates in each program.  Table 4 shows somewhat mixed results on the 2009 MFAT scores when compared to 2008 scores.  Table 5 provides the data on the number of undergraduate and graduate students receiving degrees in 2009 in comparison to 2008. Fluctuation from one year to the next is not always the best indicator of student success, but of particular note here are the increases in graduates in most of the graduate programs.

                                                                                 Table 4

Dept/Program

2008

2009

CRM

153.79

160.23

HST

142.32

141.47

PLS

161.88

159.18

SOC

149.74

153

                                                                         Table 5

Level

Degree Earned

2008

2009

% Change

Undergraduate

Anthropology - BA

6

8

ANT

Undergraduate

Anthropology - BS

22

23

+10.7%

Undergraduate

Criminology (Comp) - BA

1

1

 

Undergraduate

Criminology (Comp) - BS

78

61

CRM

Undergraduate

Criminology (Non-Comp) - BS

0

20

+3.8%

Undergraduate

Economics (Comp) - BS

5

3

 

Undergraduate

Economics - BA

0

5

ECO

Undergraduate

Economics - BS

18

9

-13%

Undergraduate

History - BA

31

23

HST

Undergraduate

History - BSED

35

31

-18.2%

Undergraduate

Philosophy - BA

4

3

PHI

Undergraduate

Philosophy - BS

4

7

+25%

Undergraduate

Political Science (Comp) - BS

4

0

 

Undergraduate

Political Science - BA

8

11

 

Undergraduate

Political Science - BS

18

30

 

Undergraduate

Public Administration - BA

0

1

PLS

Undergraduate

Public Administration - BS

3

1

+30.3%

Undergraduate

Religious Studies - BA

15

11

-26.7%

Undergraduate

Sociology - BA

4

3

SOC

Undergraduate

Sociology - BS

56

48

-15%

Graduate

Accelerated-PA - MPA

1

2

+100%

Graduate

Criminology - MS

0

7

--

Graduate

DSS - MS

12

23

+91.7%

Graduate

History - MA

7

13

+85.7%

Graduate

PLS - MIAA

18

8

-55.5%

Graduate

PLS - MPA

7

9

+28.6%

Graduate

REL - MA

6

9

+50%

Graduate

Sec Edu/HST - MSED

1

0

--

Graduate

Sec Edu/Social Studies-MSED

0

1

--

Table 6 indicates the percentage change in graduate headcount and graduate SCH from fall 2008 to fall 2009 and establishes goals for fall 2010 for graduate headcount and graduate SCH.  Most graduate programs achieved or nearly achieved their goal in graduate headcount in fall 2009. Of particular note are the increases in ANT (+77.8%; 16 up from 9), DSS (+14.8%; 62 up from 54), and HST-MA (+11.8%; 57 up from 51). All graduate programs registered significant increases in SCH from fall 2008 to fall 2009.* 

Table 6  

Grad Dept/ Prog

Grad majors fa08

Grad majors fa09

% change fa08/ fa09

Goal fa10

% change fa10/ fa09

 

Grad
DEPT/ PROG

Total SCH Grad fa08

% change SCH fa 08/09

Total SCH Grad fa09

SCH Goal Grad fa10

% change SCH fa10/09

 ANT

9

16

+77.8%

22

+37.5%

 

ANT

48

+206%

147

200

+36%

CRM

29

31

+6.9%

38

+22.6%

 

CRM

191

+57.1%

300

360

+23.7%

DSS

54

62

+14.8%

68

+9.7%

 

DSS

279

+77.4%

495

515

+4%

HST-MA

51

57

+11.8%

62

+8.8%

 

ECO

120

+103%

276

289

+4.7%

HST-MSED

8

7

-12.5%

8

+14.3%

 

HST

244

+43%

349

400

+19.6%

PLS-MPA

29

28

-3.4%

32

+14.3%

 

PLS

486

+38.3%

672

720

+8%

PLS-GBL

34

30

-11.8%

32

+3.3%

 

REL

105

+33.3%

140

150

+5.6%

REL

31

28

-9.7%

30

+7.1%

 

SOC

36

N/A

0

0

--

TOTAL

245

254

+3.7%

292

+15%

 

 

1509

+57.6%

2379

2634

+10.7%

 

 


 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





























*The manner in which graduate SCH is now computed in Banner has somewhat inflated the percentages of change between fa08 and fa09. In the case of ECO it has lowered the percentage of undergraduate SCH.

c. CHPA Enrollments by Modality 

The majority of the SCH in CHPA in fall 2009 (83.7%) was produced in traditional classroom settings.  The projection is that that will continue in fall 2010 (= 81.1%).  Note, however, there is a growing percentage (+2.6% in fall 2009) that was generated by on-line courses, while evening courses have tended to have lower enrollments, and telecourses have remained steady with only a modest growth.  The charts below provide both undergraduate and graduate (where relevant) projections of SCH for each of these modalities as well as a comparative ratio between fall 2009 SCH and our goals for SCH in fall 2010.

The most dynamic SCH changes are occurring in on-line instruction. Several CHPA Departments developed new or taught existing on-line classes during 2009 and more will be available to students in summer and fall 2010. The growth in SCH is a reflection of these additional courses and increasing enrollments in existing on-line courses. Table 5 provides SCH data on CHPA undergraduate on-line courses and Table 6 provides SCH data for graduate on-line courses. CRM in particular has taken the lead on the development of on-line courses and should very soon have the entire undergraduate and graduate program available on-line.  Note that changes in Banner have lead to the elimination of undergraduate on-line SCH for ECO and a large drop in PLS undergraduate SCH.

                                     Table 5: undergraduate                                                  Table 6: graduate

Undergrad
Dept/
Program

On-Line SCH Fa08

On-line
SCH Fa09

% SCH fa08/
fa09

Goal Fa10

% SCH
Fall 10/09

 

Grad
Dept/
Program

On-line SCH Fa08

On-line
SCH Fa09

% SCH fa08/ fa09

On-line SCH
Goal Fa10

% SCH
Fall 10/09

 ANT

0

0

0

0

0

 

ANT

0

0

0

0

0

CRM

39

339

+769%

420

+23.9%

 

CRM

33

195

+455%

240

+23.1%

ECO

87

0

Ban*

0

0

 

DSS

0

0

0

0

0

HST

285

318

+2.1%

330

+3.8%

 

ECO

0

57

Ban*

60

+5.3%

PHI

0

0

0

0

0

 

HST

69

87

--

93

+6.9%

PLS

99

27*

Ban*

120

+344%

 

PLS

57

150

+132%

162

+8%

REL

0

0

0

0

0

 

REL

0

0

0

0

0

SOC

174

240

+20.7%

375

+56.2%

 

Soc

0

0

--

0

0

Total

684

924

+35.1%

1245

+34.7%

 

Total

159

489

+183%

555

+13.5%

Recent enrollment trends in undergraduate evening classes (-28.7% from fa08 to fa09) have resulted in a decline in SCH (from 3085 to 2200). Graduate evening classes (excluding DSS that are considered “off-campus”) did manage a small positive addition in SCH (+.3% from fa08 to fa09 with an increase from 876 to 879). Increased efforts will be made to recruit non-traditional students and increase the number of graduate students in order to reach projected increases in CHPA evening courses in fall 2010. 

CHPA has a long history of developing, revising, and offering telecourses at the undergraduate level.  To this point all of these courses are in the General Education program and since many of them are offered during the second block (2nd 8-weeks section of the semester) they have a steady trend of enrollment.  As Table 7 shows, that trend continued to be affirmed in fall 2009. Continued growth is predicted for fall 2010 as the I-Tunes format grows in popularity. 

                                                                              Table 7

Undergrad
Dept/Program

SCH Fall 08

SCH Fall 09

% Change Fa08/Fa09

SCH Goal
Fall 2010
 

% Change Fa10/09

ECO

129

153

+18.6%

180

+17.6%

HST

117

129

+10.3%

150

+16.3%

PHI

--

135

Undefined

142

+5.2%

PLS

247

258

+4.5%

275

+6.6%

REL

228

312

+45.6%

330

+5.8%

CHPA Total

721

987

+36.9%

1077

+9.1%


d. Retention Initiatives

The college as a whole and each of its departments developed retention strategies in 2009 to assist them in reaching their enrollment and retention goals for fall 2010. Here is a concise list of these departmental and college-wide strategies:

  • Appointment of the Associate Dean, Pam Sailors, as College director of enrollment management services.  She chaired the CHPA committee on student success and retention. A representative from each Department sits on this committee and serves as the recruitment and retention coordinator for their Department. Their job included provided input on these issues and analyzing the results of the CHPA Student Success survey. It was administered to our majors in spring and fall 2009.
  • Advisement specialists were hired in three targeted areas (CRM, HST BS Ed, and PLS). Each of these advisement specialists began their work in fall 2009 and they have provided extended office hours and met with native and transfer students by appointment.
  • Each Department and Program in the College began using a rolling, three-year planning cycle of schedule building that is displayed on their website. The planning cycle is based on regular statistical analysis of enrollment trends by Department Heads and the Dean’s Office as well as monitoring student needs (graduation requirements and in some instances career oriented curriculum) through regular student surveys and other assessment measures. The purpose is to provide students with a reliable gauge of sequenced course offerings as they plan their degree program. Such a planning cycle will also facilitate curricular reform, judicious allocation of College resources, and a hiring plan designed to meet the program needs of each Department and the College.
  • Information has also been placed on the departmental and college websites displaying how a degree can be completed in three or four years depending on the major: http://www.missouristate.edu/chpa/39134.htm.
  • ECO and SOC participation in the SI program has proven to be a real success for their students.
  • Jim Moyer (REL) and Eric Nelson (HST) were appointed as Provost Fellows in the FCTL. Their duties include mentoring Teaching Assistants in the Social Sciences and Humanities and involvement in the Curricular Learning Communities.

Goal 2: Increase Development Efforts to restore scholarship accounts and provide additional sources of travel and research funding for faculty.

  • The Dean put together an Advisory Committee of individuals from the community who have assisted with Development efforts, provided feedback on the public face of the College (newsletter, college and departmental web pages, brochures), helped to bolster our community engagement activities, and assist with the development of a vision statement for the College.
  • Until the Directors of Development were reassigned to general duties with the Foundation, Donna Merrell obtained a number of gifts that enhanced existing scholarship, created new endowed scholarships, and provided PLS with a $100,000 gifted fund to assist the MPA Budgeting faculty member with research and travel costs.
  • Keith Payne (DSS) continued to be successful in securing significant levels of external funding from the Scaife Foundation, Northrup Corporation, Boeing, and other institutions to provide funds for scholarships and to support the teaching mission of the department.

Goal 3: Work with Keith Payne to revise BOG resolution on DSS and evaluate his role as Dept Head.

  • The BOG passed a resolution in October 2009: “The Dean of the College of Humanities and Public Affairs has the discretion to provide funding above the 2005 Budget for DSS for traditional and routine items that the College would normally provide to its departments.”  As a result, CHPA is helping to fund the cost of per course instruction in DSS and that has strengthened their financial situation.
  • Keith Payne agreed to a new two year contract as Department Head.

Goal 4: Increase the number of on-line courses offered by the college (especially in CRM and HST).

  • During 2009 the growth in the number of on-line courses in CRM resulted in undergraduate SCH rising from 39 (fa08) to 324 (fa09), an increase of 731%. At that same time, the graduate SCH increased over fa08 levels from 33 to 183 in fa09, a jump of 455%.
  •  HST increased its undergraduate SCH in on-line courses by 2.1% and offered two graduate seminars on-line for the first time that resulted in 83 SCH over fa08. 

Goal 5: Increase the number of external grants written and submitted.

  • Dennis Hickey once again obtained external funding from the Taiwan government to sponsor an international conference on the MSU campus in fall 2009 on the current diplomatic relationship between China and Taiwan. 

Goal 6: Successfully complete external review for HST and begin the process for ECO.

  • In October 2009, Dr. Timothy Hall (Central Michigan University) and Dr. Michael Galgano (James Madison University) served as external reviewers for the History Department and filed their report in November.  A preliminary response from the History Department was submitted on December 11th that outlined planned curricular and program revisions that will be discussed and implemented within the next calendar year.  One item stressed by the reviewers was the need to consider the additional of a Public History position/program.
  • ECO began the process of preparing their self-study in anticipation of the visit of an external reviewer in fall 2010.  This work also included identifying likely candidates to serve as an external reviewer.

Goal 7: Successfully recruit new faculty.

Hiring during the 2009-2010 academic year resulted in five successful searches.  In each case the individuals hired contribute to the college’s efforts to increase diversity with four of the five being female and one new hire a Hispanic.  The Asian historian and the Middle Eastern politics positions will support departmental, Area Studies, and Global Studies programs. The position in Econometrics strengthens the efforts in ECO to upgrade their calculus-based foundation for their majors and better prepare them for graduate school and the professions.  The upgrade of the Instructor position in Social Studies-HST to an Assistant Professor position not only provides greater flexibility to the largest BSED program in the university, but it also adds another person qualified to teach in the masters program as well.  Unfortunately, the financial situation in the state made it necessary to close Instructor searches in ANT and PHI.

  • CRM hired Patty Salinas at the Associate Professor rank with tenure to fill a newly created position in Criminal Law and the Courts. Funding for this position came from reallocation of an empty line in HST.
  • ECO hired Gabriela Best as an Assistant Professor to fill the position in Econometrics replacing the retiring John Hoftyzer.
  • HST hired Marcia Butler as an Assistant Professor to fill the position in Asian History left vacant by the resignation of Akiko Sugiyama.
  • HST hired Michelle Morgan as an Assistant Professor to fill the upgraded position in Social Studies to support the BSED and MSED programs.
  • PLS hired David Romano as an advanced Assistant Professor to fill the Strong Chair in Middle Eastern Politics.

Goal 8: Provide more coordination between Office of International Studies and the Area Studies Programs and with international student applications for graduate programs.

  • Under the leadership of Steve Berkwitz (REL), John Chuchiak (HST), and Bethany Walker (HST), greater coordination was achieved.  In addition, the new hires in PLS – Middle Eastern politics and in HST – Asian History will make it possible to provide regular course offerings in these areas at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.
  • The addition of an archaeological field school in Jordan (summer 2010), directed by Bethany Walker (HST), provides an opportunity for the first time in many years for our students to participate in this type of experience.
  • The changes in leadership in the Study Away office have also helped to regularize procedures for short courses and overseas field schools.  During 2009, one overseas short course took students to the Netherlands.

Goal 9: Work with Directors of research centers (SOC and ECO) to increase their level of community
involvement and increase their visibility on campus.

  • David Mitchell (Director of the Bureau for Economic Research) has revived the website and produced regular economic forecasts that have caught the attention of both state and national leaders and agencies.  His activities include the presentation of an economic forecast of the Missouri economy to the Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank,  and an invitation from the U.S. Census Bureau to present a paper entitled “Industrial and Employment Composition and their Impact on Taxable Sales,” in St. Louis at the Local Employment Dynamics Partnership Workshop in March 2010. He has also been involved with the creation of the Center for Economic Education that plans to sponsor local workshops for public school teachers and local business people.
  • Lorene Stone (Director of the Center for Social Science and Public Policy Research) has expanded the facilities of the Center, making us of additional computers, software, and equipment funded by the CHPA Dean, and obtained a number of new projects that benefit the research mission of the college and assist local agencies with their survey and data collection needs.  Among these projects are surveys on “Attitudes of Springfield Voters toward Public Health Issues,” for the Missouri Department of Transportation and a “Survey of Uninsured and Underinsured Residents of Greene County, Missouri,” for the Springfield/Greene County Regional Health Commission.

Goal 10: Continue to promote the Public Affairs mission in our classes, our on-campus and off-campus activities, in study away short courses, and in conjunction with the Community and Social Issues Institute.

Information on regularly scheduled events, including History Day, Archaeology Quest, and Women’s History Month that promote the Public Affairs activities are highlighted in the spring and fall issues of the CHPA Newsletter:

Spring 2009 issue: http://www.missouristate.edu/assets/chpa/CHPA_Newsletter_SP09.pdf

Fall 2009 issue: http://www.missouristate.edu/assets/chpa/CHPA_newsletter_fall_09_v6_pdf.pdf

Additional items of particular note include:

  • The Master of Public Administration program and the Department of Political Science hosted a conference on “Childhood Obesity Prevention: A Call to Action” on March 27-28, 2009. The conference was attended by well over 50 healthcare professionals, policy makers, educators, parks and recreation personnel, food service personnel, physical education teachers, nutrition educators, child care providers, and members of youth organizations.
  • With the assistance of the CSII, the MPA program planned workshops for spring 2010 on (1) using GIS for public managers, (2) worker motivation and increasing productivity, and (3) using citizen surveys to assess community opinions. Some of these workshops will be delivered by interactive television.
  • The CHPA Dean created a Research Forum featuring second-year faculty that was open to the campus and to the community at large.
  • The first annual conference on Criminology and Criminal Justice Issues was held in January 2009, featuring keynote speaker Dr. Robert Taylor, from the W. W. Caruth, Jr. Police Institute of Dallas, and focusing on “Public Affairs in the Profession.” Attendees included representatives from several local and regional law enforcement agencies as well as social service agencies.

Goal 11: Continue to maintain the high level of scholarly productivity by CHPA faculty.

As Table 8 indicates, the faculty in CHPA continued to maintain an active scholarly agenda.  The increase in the number of presentations at professional conferences is a few indicator of research in progress that should begin appearing in print within the near future.

Table 8

Scholarly Activity

2008

2009

Book

7

10

Book Chapter

17

17

Refereed Journal Article

32

27

Presentation

94

109