Missouri State University

Report 2012

 

College of Humanities and Public Affairs

Annual Report 2012 – Prepared by Victor H. Matthews, Dean

 

  1. Assessment Efforts:
  1. External Program Review

The Department of Political Science prepared for and experienced external review of their programs in 2012. The department wrote a self-study, using APSA review guidelines, which was approved by the dean and the Office of the Provost. Dr. Charles H. Blake served as the external reviewer for Political Science.  Dr. Blake is department chair of the Department of Political Science at James Madison University, and is an experienced external reviewer. He conducted a site visit at Missouri State in October 2012, submitting his written report on November 6, 2012. The report takes a favorable view of the department, but it does contain a number of recommendations for improving both undergraduate and graduate programs. In spring 2013 the department developed an Action Plan in response to Blake’s suggestions, with planned implementation beginning in 2013-2014.  The Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice prepared their external review self-study in fall and spring 2012-2013 with a planned external reviewer coming in fall 2013.  The external review process continues to prove beneficial to the departments and the college and serves as an opportunity for self-assessment and dialogue among faculty about their curriculum and future plans.

  1. Assessment Revisions in the College

In spring 2012, each Department and program in the college completed the revision of their assessment plans.  A college-wide committee assisted in coordinating this effort to create a revised and realistic set of Student Learning Objectives for each program, which would address disciplinary goals as well as the University’s Public Affairs Mission (the latter a reflection of the current efforts to revise the University’s General Education Program).  Conclusions drawn in the process include expected variations based on discipline, the previous forms of assessment measures, and the desire to take advantage of this opportunity to make better use of the data produced by the newly shaped assessment methods. What has emerged is a more systematic formal structure with rubrics tied to specific learning outcomes.  Interpretation of the data collected during 2012-2013 should provide the departments with enough clear evidence to make curricular decisions and respond to student concerns. With these new assessment programs now in place, the departments will report on what has been accomplished this year early in fall 2013 and provide a list of actions taken based on the analysis of the collected data.  For instance, CRM has made a total revamping of their curriculum, based in part on national trends and the signing of MOU agreements with local two-year schools, and thus their data collection will reflect those changes for their students.  A summary of the plans for each department are found at: http://www.missouristate.edu/assets/assessment/CHPADepartmentalAssessmentMethods-spring2012.pdf).

  1. Curricular Changes

During FY12 several Departments in CHPA conducted curricular assessments and made significant revisions to their curriculum.  In every case, the impetus for these efforts was to (1) bring the curriculum into line with disciplinary standards, and (2) to contribute to student success through a more focused set of courses.

  1. CRM undertook a complete overhaul of its graduate curriculum, revising the list of required classes, and modifying the methods/statistics courses by combining them into one course (CRM 705) effective fall 2013.  The department also created several undergraduate elective courses, from a group of courses that have been offered previously as “397” special topics courses. These courses will be offered as the need/opportunity arises to enrich their curriculum.
  2. In response to a suggestion by their external reviewer in 2011, ECO created a new class (ECO 101) that provides instruction for non-majors in financial responsibility and basic economic principles.  The course was approved for inclusion in the new General Education curriculum in fall 2014.
  3. History made minor changes in the BSED to conform to state requirements.  Beginning in fall of 2013, students will need a 3.0 content GPA to gain admittance into the education program. Other curriculum changes are being discussed that might improve student performance in HST 598 such as the requirement of a 500 level course.
  4. After eliminating the Public Administration major, PLS implemented a new undergraduate curriculum that reduces the number of free electives and requires majors to take PLS 169 as an introduction to the major. Several 200-level courses are now required to ensure majors experience a fuller ranger of topics associated with the field of Political Science. Additional changes are anticipated based on the recommendations of their external reviewer.
  5. Preliminary data from FCTL (now Institutional Research) clearly demonstrate that the students who majored in PLS and took the online version of the ETS® Proficiency Profile under the supervision of their PLS faculty member outperformed their non-PLS peers in terms of academic prowess.  This analysis still needs to extend to a comparison of PLS majors who took the online exam with those who took the written exam.
  6. The revision of the curriculum of the master's program in REL, including lowering and simplifying the entrance requirements, lowering the total number of hours required for the degree, simplifying the curricular structure, and changing the comprehensive examination was implemented in fall 2012. Two courses approved by the department appeared in the catalog as regularized offerings: REL 341: C.S. Lewis and REL 347: Suffering and Meaning, and REL 370 has been added to the Global Studies major.
  1. Enrollment Management Analysis
  1. Total SCH:
    Five years of total SCH in CHPA by calendar year demonstrate peaks and valleys in enrollment by lower division, upper division, and graduate courses.  The one constant, however, is a steady growth in overall SCH from 2008 to 2012 resulting in a 10.9% increase during that period.  While the College’s SCH continues to be heavily dependent on General Education offerings, there has also been an increase in majors, especially in CRM and DSS, during this period.

Calendar Year

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Course Level

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Lower Division

51,203

51,970

52,116

54,105

55,862

Upper Division

18,270

17,904

17,936

18,311

18,912

Graduate

3,314

4,135

5,072

4,634

4,366

Total

72,787

74,009

75,124

77,050

79,140

 

One problematic factor here is the inconsistency in graduate enrollment. Efforts have been made to improve recruiting and there has been growth in DSS as a result of the receipt of a contract to provide instruction to students from the National Defense University.  Balancing the inevitable loss of students each semester are CHPA’s retention efforts, especially the additional of professional academic advisors in CRM, HST, and PLS.  CRM has also redesigned its advising system and added a student “Peer Advisor.”  Diane Leamy and Shelley Stewart-Luth work to see every CRM major prior to registration, contact those students experiencing severe academic problems, and also see all incoming freshman and transfer students.

  1. General Education:
    As in previous years, CHPA is heavily dependent upon its General Education course offerings.  As much as 58% of the college’s SCH comes from this source and therefore the revision of the GE program during 2012-2013 has the potential to significantly impact departments like HST, PHI, PLS, REL, and SOC/ANT.  CRM has no GE courses and ECO only has one, but ECO’s fortunes are closely tied to enrollment in COBA.  It should also be noted that many students are now entering college with dual credit or have transfer credit for these General Education courses. The chart below compares the enrollment figures of fa11 and fa12.  Fluctuations from one year to the next are caused in part by the number of sections offered, but a 1.7% growth in SCH is a positive indicator that the college continues to attract students to its GE courses.

Course

Enroll–
 fa11

Sections fall 11

Enroll – fa12

Sections fall 12

%Enroll fa12/fa11

 

PHI 105

96

2

96

2

100%

AAS 100

253

5

261

5

103.2%

 

PHI 110

384

9

373

8

97.1%

ANT 100

302

7

321

8

106.3%

 

PHI 115

330

7

367

8

111.2%

ANT 125

72

2

72

2

100%

 

PLS 101

1476

22

1487

22

100.7%

ECO 155

718

12

808

13

112.5%

 

REL 100

615

14

589

14

95.8%

GST 170

48

1

35

1

72.9%

 

REL 101

149

5

111

5

74.5%

HST 103

300

8

256

6

85.3%

 

REL 102

151

4

99

3

65.6%

HST 104

306

7

262

7

85.6%

 

REL 131

196

5

227

6

115.8%

HST 121

600

12

608

14

101.3%

 

REL 210

190

4

211

4

111.1%

HST 122

657

15

808

18

123%

 

SOC 150

830

12

714

12

86%

 

 

 

 

 

Totals

 

CHPA

7577

149

7705

 

101.7%

 

  1. Graduate Programs:
    One concern for the College has been the inability to maintain steady growth in its graduate programs.  Some of that decline is attributable to a shift in emphasis in COBA that no longer requires ECO 600 and ECO 710 for their MBA students.  In other cases the drop is based on fewer graduate students being recruited into the college’s programs and that is being addressed with the appointment of new graduate directors in CRM, HST, and the MPA program for fall 2013.  Only CRM and DSS have shown significant growth while PLS and REL have remained relatively steady. 

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Term

Dept

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

 

 

3,314

4,135

5,072

4,634

4,366

Fall

 

1,509

2,379

2,260

2,058

2,122

 

CRM

0

0

0

259

276

 

DSS

279

495

591

543

708

 

ECO

120

276

225

180

123

 

HST

244

349

369

318

249

 

PHI

0

0

3

0

0

 

PLS

486

672

510

549

549

 

REL

105

140

145

110

124

 

SOC/ANT

275

447

417

99

93

Spring

 

1,334

1,501

2,257

2,149

1,809

 

CRM

0

0

0

0

206

 

DSS

324

312

489

561

501

 

ECO

114

96

222

135

60

 

HST

225

196

325

329

299

 

PHI

0

0

0

0

3

 

PLS

421

573

645

615

549

 

REL

136

84

129

149

114

 

SOC/ANT

114

240

447

360

77

 

It is clear from the chart above that DSS and PLS are the prime generators of graduate level SCH for the college.  Growth in CRM suggests that it is maturing as a program and will soon be attracting more students.  Both the masters programs in Public Administration and Global Studies can handle a larger number of students, and at this point some efforts are being made to shift more MPA classes to online mode and more vigorous recruiting efforts are being made for both programs. While cramped by their facilities, DSS has continued to grow and the receipt of the National Defense University contract has brought them additional students.  HST has lost ground during 2012 and greater efforts by the new Graduate Director will be needed to recruit larger numbers of students and develop more online classes. The program in ANT, while still fairly new, has not grown as fast as expected, but current recruitment indicates improvement in the coming year.  REL has maintained a steady level for many years. More aggressive recruiting efforts by the new Director can build on their enrollments.

  1. Access:
    CHPA has made concerted efforts to increase accessibility through a number of measures including the redesign of departmental websites that are more intuitive and attractive to students and the introduction of a range of teaching modalities.  Although the vast majority of students are still enrolled in traditional seated classes during the day, there has been steady growth in the number of students enrolled in online and blended courses. That is evidenced by the steady increase in online enrollments from 1,155 to 8,248 from 2007 to 2012. 

                                                               CHPA SCH Growth in INET Courses
 

FY

FY

Fall

FY

FY

FY

 

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

 

SCH

SCH

SCH

SCH

SCH

SCH

 CHPA

1,155

1.659

3,048

4,752

7,065

8,248

 

In terms of growth among the modalities, the evening college, blended courses (including a new blended version of PLS 576/676), and online courses are doing well and becoming more acceptable to students. The revival of evening classes may be due to the efforts of the Office of Access, but also additional graduate offerings and the revised start schedule. The College will continue to work in the coming year with Joye Norris to gauge the need for more seated and blended evening courses.  The decline in Dual Credit will be addressed in the coming year to see if new schools can be added and additional courses be taught.

CY

CY 2007

CY 2008

CY 2009

CY 2010

CY 2011

CY 2012

Traditional

57,493

55,565

57,602

55,403

54,699

54,371

Off Campus

2,273

2,090

1,887

2,146

2,177

2,139

I-Courses

2,559

2,423

2,582

2,934

3,213

2,635

Intersession

1,220

1,419

1,002

1,421

1,094

919

Internet

1,155

1,659

3,048

4,752

7,065

8,248

Evening

8,284

8,301

6,240

5,982

5,091

6,466

Dual Credit

1,287

975

1,215

948

840

747

Blended

--

--

135

1,206

2,616

3,162


The total number of on-line course offerings seems to have reached a temporary plateau.  They rose quickly from just five in spring 2006 to thirty-three in spring 2012. Since then the interesting development has been the addition of on-line classes by other departments and that suggests additional growth in the future. CRM’s placement of their entire undergraduate and graduate program online has been completed and is complimented by numerous on-line offerings in the summer session.

                                                Number of On-Line Sections offered by CHPA Departments

Dept

SP06

FA06

SP07

FA07

SP08

FA08

SP09

FA09

SP10

FA10

 

SP11

 

FA11

SP12

FA12

CRM

2

2

3

5

4

2

4

7

7

10

 

12

 

13

12

10

DSS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

ECO

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

1

1

1

 

1

 

2

1

2

HST

1

2

1

3

4

3

2

4

4

4

 

5

 

5

6

3

PHI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

1

PLS

2

2

3

2

2

2

4

4

5

6

 

12

 

6

8

5

REL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

2

SOC

 

 

 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

 

2

 

1

2

4

TOTAL

5

7

7

12

11

9

11

17

18

22

 

32

 

29

33

28

 

  1. Majors and Graduation Statistics and Analysis

During the course of the past five years, the number of CHPA undergraduate majors has slowly but steadily risen. 

 

Fall 2008

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Undergrad

Undergrad

Undergrad

Undergrad

Undergrad

Majors

Majors

Majors

Majors

Majors

1,221

1,283

1,358

1,364

1,380

 

One factor, as demonstrated in the comprehensive chart below that displays both undergraduate and graduate majors in each department and program, has been the emergence of CRM as our most popular undergraduate major, growing from 311 majors in fall 2008 to 518 in fall 2012, a 60% increase.  However, with its decoupling from the SOC/ANT Department, the number of SOC majors has dipped from 140 in fall 2008 to 74 in fall 2012 (a 52.9% decrease).  Of course, efforts are being made by the SOC faculty to advertise their “Public Sociology” emphasis, but it is expected that it will take several years for them to significantly increase the number of their majors.  Two other programs are worth noting: (1) ANT has seen a 27.9% increase from 111 to 142 majors and (2) ECO increased from 63 to 74 majors (a 17.5% increase). No other undergraduate degrees have seen positive changes and in fact most have remained statistically flat or slightly down over this same period.

 

In terms of graduate programs, DSS is clearly well above the rest in total majors.  They have grown from 54 to 93 majors in the period from fall 2008 to fall 2012.  This growth is due in part to their ability to offer additional courses and most recently the contract with the National Defense University, which over the next five years will bring cohorts of up to 24 students per semester, on top of current student numbers.  CRM is also showing signs of growth and has potential to rise into the 70-75 student range.

 

Fall 2008

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

DEPT

Program

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

 

 

1,467

1,549

1,628

1,638

1,650

CRM

 

0

0

0

532

563

 

CRIM-BS-COMP

0

0

0

0

1

 

CRIM-MS

0

0

0

28

31

 

CRMA-MS

0

0

0

1

3

 

CRMN-BA

0

0

0

38

49

 

CRMN-BS

0

0

0

455

468

 

HSAD-GRCT

0

0

0

10

11

DSS

 

54

62

74

71

93

 

DEGE-MS

0

0

0

0

28

 

DEST-GRCT

0

2

1

0

2

 

DEST-MS

54

60

73

71

46

 

DEWM-MS

0

0

0

0

17

ECO

 

63

64

67

60

74

 

ECOC-BS

24

27

21

24

27

 

ECON-BA

14

5

6

6

6

 

ECON-BS

25

32

40

30

41

HST

 

358

372

397

391

353

 

HIMA-MA

0

0

0

0

1

 

HIST-BA

107

119

133

135

115

 

HIST-MA

51

57

53

54

40

 

HITC-GRCT

0

0

0

0

1

 

HSTE-BSED

192

189

202

190

187

 

IDHI-BA

0

0

1

1

1

 

SEHI-MSED

3

4

5

6

4

 

SESS-MSED

5

3

3

5

4

PHI

 

41

39

43

37

35

 

PHIL-BA

25

26

24

15

18

 

PHIL-BS

16

13

19

22

17

PLS

 

255

258

254

235

220

 

GLBA-MGS

0

0

0

1

1

 

GLBS-MGS

0

30

16

22

16

 

IAAD-MIAA

34

0

7

5

0

 

POLC-BS

33

38

17

4

0

 

POLI-BA

50

54

56

36

36

 

POLN-BS

96

97

130

137

139

 

PUBA-MPA

2

0

2

1

1

 

PUMG-BA

4

5

1

0

0

 

PUMG-BS

8

6

3

2

1

 

PUMG-MPA

27

28

21

24

25

 

PUMT-GRCT

1

0

1

3

1

REL

 

96

99

96

90

82

 

IDRE-BS

0

0

1

0

1

 

RELA-MA

0

2

4

6

6

 

REPR-GRCT

0

1

0

0

1

 

REST-BA

65

61

39

33

28

 

REST-BS

0

9

28

34

29

 

REST-MA

31

26

24

17

17

SOC/ANT

 

600

655

696

222

230

 

ANTH-BA

43

44

46

54

54

 

ANTH-BS

68

68

70

82

88

 

APAN-MS

9

16

22

20

14

 

CRIM-BS-NONC

0

0

2

0

0

 

CRIM-MS

29

32

30

0

0

 

CRMC-BA

3

6

9

0

0

 

CRMC-BS

92

39

11

0

0

 

CRMN-BA

17

27

36

0

0

 

CRMN-BS

199

307

371

0

0

 

HSAD-GRCT

0

5

7

0

0

 

IDSO-BS

0

0

2

0

0

 

SOCI-BA

13

5

9

15

18

 

SOCI-BA-PRE

0

4

6

0

0

 

SOCI-BS

127

75

56

48

54

 

SOCI-BS-PRE

0

27

19

3

2

 

1,467

1,549

1,628

1,638

1,650

 

A further measure of undergraduate student success in CHPA is its graduation rate. Over the five year period from 2008 to 2012 the college has averaged 302 degrees conferred.  While PHI has fallen below the mandated 10/year average during this period at 8.8, it is actually serving more students than any other Philosophy program in the state except the one at MU-Columbia. The largest number of graduates by far is in CRM, averaging 88.2 each fiscal year.  As a result of this success, a number of resources have been shifted to support CRM, including the addition of two senior professors and two additional full-time instructors. Additional hires are anticipated.

 

FY2008

FY2009

FY2010

FY2011

FY2012

5-Year

Degree

DEPT

Program

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Avg.

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Grad

 

 

 

312

299

302

297

300

302

BA

 

 

69

66

59

77

84

71

 

ECO

 

0

5

1

1

0

 

 

HST

 

31

23

22

25

43

28.8

 

PHI

 

4

3

3

7

4

8.8 total

 

PLS

 

8

12

5

16

7

35.2 total

 

REL

 

15

11

16

11

11

18.4 total

 

SOC/ANT

 

11

12

12

17

19

 

 

 

ANTH-BA

6

8

9

11

17

28.8 total

 

 

SOCI-BA

4

3

2

2

2

42 total

BS

 

 

208

202

207

193

191

200.2

 

CRM

 

0

0

0

0

98

 

 

ECO

 

23

12

21

19

15

 

 

PHI

 

4

7

5

3

4

 

 

PLS

 

25

31

28

22

22

 

 

REL

 

0

0

5

7

16

 

 

SOC/ANT

 

156

152

148

142

35

 

 

 

ANTH-BS

22

23

19

13

16

 

 

 

CRMC-BS

78

61

22

2

0

 

 

 

CRMN-BS

0

20

67

93

0

 

 

 

IDSO-BS

0

0

0

2

0

 

 

 

SOCI-BS

56

48

40

32

19

 

BSED

History

 

35

31

36

27

25

30.8

 

The number of graduate students in each program has been addressed above.  The chart below provides data on the number of graduates from each program.  After just four years, the CRM degree has exceeded the five/year average, but the MS in Applied Anthropology only began to produce graduates in 2011 and will require more time to determine its viability. All other programs in CHPA easily exceed the necessary graduation success rate of 5/year.  Of course, the number of graduates fluctuates from year to year depending on the backlog of students who finally complete their theses after exceeding the normal two year period of instruction.

 

FY2008

FY2009

FY2010

FY2011

FY2012

5-year avg

Degree

DEPT

Program

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Number

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Grads

GRCT

 

 

1

0

18

11

8

7.6

 

CRM

 

0

0

0

0

7

 

 

DSS

 

0

0

12

1

0

 

 

PLS

 

0

0

0

0

1

 

 

REL

 

1

0

1

1

0

 

 

CRM

HSAD-GRCT

0

0

5

9

0

 

MA

 

 

13

22

9

29

19

14.4

 

HST

 

7

13

5

21

14

12

 

REL

 

6

9

4

8

5

6.8

MGS

PLS

 

18

8

4

8

8

12.8

MIAA

PLS

 

0

0

12

5

1

 

MPA

PLS

 

8

11

17

5

12

10.6

MS

 

 

12

30

28

35

43

29.6

 

CRM

 

0

7

8

8

11

6.8

 

DSS

 

12

23

20

25

27

24

 

ANT

 

0

0

0

2

5

NA

MSED

HST

 

1

1

0

2

3

1.4

 

53

72

88

95

94

80.4

 

Minors are another factor in the success of Departments.  They contribute an interesting mix to the discussion in upper division courses and in some cases they become majors.  The chart below tracks minors in CHPA over a four-semester period.  Only CRM has demonstrated growth in the numbers of new minors, while the rest of the departments have maintained or lost some of their numbers. The minor in Public Administration was eliminated in fall 2011 as part of the curricular revision in PLS.

Number of Minors in CHPA Departments/Programs

Depts/ Programs

Spring 2011

Fall 2011

Spring 2012

Fall 2012

ANT

37

39

31

30

CRM

74

92

105

111

ECO

77

73

75

73

HST

102

106

114

102

PHI

38

31

37

37

PLS

41

55

50

48

Public Admin

8

4

2

2

Public Law

11

14

17

19

REL

86

111

106

90

SOC

142

139

140

124

 

  1. Faculty Productivity
  1. Delaware Study Analysis:

    An examination of the Delaware Statistics over the past five years for CHPA indicates that all of the Departments in the College are making efficient use of their faculty and are being productive in producing SCH.  There is no comparable data for DSS. No CHPA Department uses Graduate Assistants to teach their own course section.  Some Departments, like PHI, PLS, and ECO use very few per course faculty, while others like CRM, HST, and REL are more dependent on per course faculty to teach multiple sections of required or General Education courses.  The number of Instructors, especially during 2012, also fluctuates based on such factors as sabbaticals or unpaid leaves and the retirement of faculty. In some cases the College has hired Instructors to fill the gap temporarily in order to insure continuity of instruction in courses in the major and in General Education.  In some instances, however, Instructors have been added to departments on an ongoing basis in order to maintain the necessary number of General Education or required courses.  While preference is given to hiring regular, tenure-track faculty whenever possible, budgetary concerns have resulted in some cases in the hiring of a lower-cost Instructor instead.  To be sure that does put a strain on faculty advising, service load, and the support of graduate programs, and therefore it is an option that is exercised with great care.

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

DEPT

Delaware Faculty Group

MSU SCH/ DEL SCH

MSU SCH/ DEL SCH

MSU SCH/ DEL SCH

MSU SCH/ DEL SCH

MSU SCH/ DEL SCH

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

CRM

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

82.1

80.2

101.5

110.4

79.9

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

140.8

123.6

79.1

95.2

87.4

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

77.6

0.0

103.7

126.0

113.5

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

e) All Faculty Combined

102.0

116.3

112.8

121.0

106.1

ECO

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

116.7

105.8

95.7

93.8

102.2

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

119.1

117.4

126.3

129.3

134.5

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

159.1

0.0

108.2

0.0

203.3

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

e) All Faculty Combined

125.3

116.1

108.1

110.0

129.4

HST

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

109.1

120.6

102.7

114.1

86.6

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

103.8

136.5

0.0

93.7

131.8

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

153.4

127.9

144.0

202.2

177.2

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

e) All Faculty Combined

107.3

119.7

109.9

113.7

112.3

PHI

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

128.4

138.6

167.8

165.3

152.9

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

0.0

0.0

0.0

120.2

113.7

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

295.3

145.5

274.5

223.5

230.5

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

e) All Faculty Combined

128.6

135.0

166.3

154.1

147.7

PLS

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

102.9

107.4

112.7

130.5

124.7

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

138.8

172.2

201.6

157.8

158.9

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

201.8

272.7

178.2

135.2

163.9

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

e) All Faculty Combined

117.2

128.6

128.4

138.8

137.3

REL

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

121.2

164.1

125.4

122.5

122.5

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

99.0

157.2

110.0

124.8

111.1

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

116.9

135.3

100.3

80.4

117.4

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

e) All Faculty Combined

129.8

159.0

126.9

131.2

135.2

ANT

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

0.0

0.0

0.0

86.7

95.2

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

0.0

0.0

0.0

87.7

52.6

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

0.0

0.0

0.0

289.9

145.5

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

e) All Faculty Combined

0.0

0.0

0.0

92.8

91.0

SOC

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

0.0

0.0

0.0

130.8

134.1

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

0.0

0.0

0.0

200.5

153.8

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

0.0

0.0

0.0

461.8

230.9

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

e) All Faculty Combined

0.0

0.0

0.0

279.2

265.2

 

  1. Scholarly Activity:
    Based on faculty reporting of their activities during 2012 in Digital Measures, CHPA had a very good year.  This can be attributed to projects completed during sabbatical leaves, the hiring of new faculty who are working toward promotion and tenure, and an active research agenda on the part of the majority of faculty in the College.  Scholarly production by newly hired tenure-track faculty is generally at acceptable levels.  Department mentors are employed to assist probationary faculty to improve their teaching and expand their research activities.  Faculty members are encouraged to attend advisement workshops, the fall and spring Showcase presentations, and workshops on promotion and tenure sponsored by the Dean’s office and the Provost’s office.  Second year probationary faculty are asked to present their current research in the CHPA Research forum.

Year

Journal Articles

Book Chapters

Books

Papers Read

2007

35

17

11

125

2008

32

17

7

116

2009

27

17

10

109

2010

35

27

5

127

2011

56

13

13

152

2012

45

19

17

156

 

Research activities of particular note include:

  • Bethany Walker (HST) – Fellow (sp 2012-fa 2012) Annemarie-Schimmel-Research College, Bonn, Germany with research focused on “History and Society during the Mamluk Era (1250-1517)”
  • Stephen Berkwitz (REL) – Fellow (fa 2011-sp 2012) Ruhr-University Bochum with research focused on Portuguese representations of Buddhism
  • Julia Watts Belser (REL) – Fellow (fa 2011-sp 2012) Harvard Divinity School with research focused on women in religion
  • Martha Finch (REL) -- Affiliate Fellow at the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University during her sabbatical (fa 2012-sp2013)
  • Scholarly monographs published during 2012:
    • Brooks Blevins (HST), Ghost of the Ozarks: Murder and Memory in the Upland South. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2012.
    • John Chuchiak (HST), The Inquisition in New Spain, 1536-1819: A Documentary History, Ediciones Nueva España Series. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.
    • Andrew Lewis (HST), The Chronicle and Historical Notes of Bernard Itier. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.
    • Stephen McIntyre, ed. Springfield's Urban Histories: Essays on the Queen City of the Missouri Ozarks. Springfield, MO: Moon City Press, 2012.
  1. Teaching:
    The quality of instruction in CHPA has always been one of the college’s strengths.  Innovations such as online and blended teaching have been readily adopted by many of our faculty, several have made good use of the services and workshops provided by the FCTL, and the Blackboard teaching software has become a standard that assists both instructors and students with course management.  Internships, service-learning experiences, and field schools provide students with real world training and have contributed to a better understanding of the university’s Public Affairs mission, their specific academic studies, and job preparation.  One means of assessing the success of our teaching is found in nationally normed tests used by several of the departments (MFAT, TUCE, LSAT, and CATS) and the acceptance rate of our undergraduate and graduate students into law schools, medical schools, and doctoral programs in their disciplinary area.  For example, 15-20% of PLS graduates have been admitted into law school.

    Among the College’s efforts to provide as rich an educational program as possible has been the research forums developed by various departments as well as the College.  During 2012, these forums provided students the opportunity to present the results of their research (oral presentation and poster presentation) and to showcase their faculty mentors.  These included the CHPA Research Forum (undergraduate and graduate participants), Anthropology Research Forum (open to both undergraduates and grad students), and the Philosophy Research Forum.  Students were also assisted (financially and through mentoring) in making presentations at regional meetings in all of our disciplinary areas.

    CHPA faculty who were recognized for their outstanding efforts in the area of teaching include:

    -- James Moyer (REL) – Foundation Award for Teaching and the Governor’s Award for Teaching

    --
    Jack Knight (PHI) received a STAR award for teaching from SGA in Spring 2012

    Service

    Faculty service activities take a variety of forms.  Of course, there is an expectation that faculty share the advisement, service and governance load in the Department and accept election or nomination to College or University committees.  Some also function as advisers for departmental and university student organizations.  In addition, and as an expression of the Public Affairs mission, a number of faculty members also serve on community boards, perform as pro bono consultants, serve as officers of disciplinary organizations, and perform editorial duties for journals and book series in their field.

    Among the faculty most heavily engaged in outstanding service activities in 2012 are:

    -- Margaret Buckner (ANT): elected Secretary of the American Anthropological Association and now a part of the Executive Committee of this international organization

    -- Keith Payne (DSS), Dennis Hickey (PLS), and David Romano (PLS) presented invited briefings to policymakers in Washington, DC

-- Lora Hobbs (REL): She took a leading role in a project called Sole Food that collects olds shoes to raise funds to buy food for the hungry. In conjunction with this project, she helped to coordinate the large-scale Meals a Million food packaging event that involved numerous groups and members from the MSU community in an effort to package over a million meals that were distributed to impoverished people in Haiti and the U.S., as well as to victims of Hurricane Sandy.

Space considerations prevent the citation of all of the activities by our faculty and students during 2012, but many have also been recorded in the CHPA Newsletter published on-line each semester:

spring 2012 -- http://www.missouristate.edu/chpa/129836.htm

fall 2012 -- http://www.missouristate.edu/chpa/147998.htm  

D. Anticipated Activities in 2013

Major transitions of leadership and staff support are among the challenges faced by CHPA departments:

  • CRM will have an interim Head during 2013-2014
  • ECO and SOC/ANT will search for a new Head during 2013-2014
  • PHI will transition from a Head to a Departmental Director in fall 2013
  • New Administrative Assistants will be hired for the Dean’s Office, HST, and SOC/ANT

A large number of faculty hires will take place in 2013-2014:

  • CRM will conduct two searches for Assistant Professors (Policing and the Courts)
  • ECO will search for one or possibly two Assistant Professors (Applied Microeconomics)
  • PHI will search for one Assistant Professor (Ethics)
  • PLS will search for two Assistant Professors (Political Theory and Administrative Policy)
  • REL will search for one Assistant Professor (Judaism)

Additional initiatives beyond normal procedures:

  • Incorporate new marketing efforts with the assistance of the PSB and CJRW marketing reports
  • Prepare for the transition to the new General Education program in fall 2014
  • Continue to improve Assessment Efforts in each department
  • Increase Development Efforts, especially the building fund for ROTC and the Alice Bartee Speakers Series, and to enhance scholarship accounts and provide additional sources of travel and research funding for faculty
  • Successfully complete external review for CRM and begin the process for SOC/ANT