Missouri State University

CHPA 2011 Annual Report

 

College of Humanities and Public Affairs

Annual Report 2011 – Prepared by Victor H. Matthews, Dean

 

  1. Assessment Efforts:
  1. External Program Review

The Departments of Philosophy and Religious Studies prepared for and experienced external review of their programs in 2011. Each department wrote a self-study, which was approved by the dean and the Office of the Provost. Dr. Timothy Renick served as the external reviewer for Religious Studies.  A former program director and then founding department chair of the Department of Religious Studies at Georgia State University, and current Senior Associate Provost for Academic Programs at Georgia State, Dr. Renick is a national leader in the discipline. Dr. Renick conducted a site visit at Missouri State in October 2011, submitting his written report by the end of that semester. Though that report was largely favorable, it did contain a number of recommendations for improving an already excellent department. In spring 2012 the department developed an Action Plan in response to those suggestions, with implementation beginning in 2012-2013.  The external reviewer chosen for Philosophy was Dr. James Swindler of Illinois State University.  His recommendations were not deemed as useful by the Philosophy faculty and their response and Action Plan is not as detailed as the one from Religious Studies.  The external review process also was beneficial to both departments as an opportunity for self-assessment and dialogue among faculty about their curriculum and future plans.

  1. Assessment Revisions

In addition to external program review, each Department and program in the college underwent a self- and peer-analysis of their assessment plans.  A college-wide committee was formed to (1) follow up on the work done in 2010-2011 by FCTL and the University Assessment Council, and (2) create a revised and realistic set of Learning Objectives for each program, which would address disciplinary goals as well as the University’s Public Affairs Mission (the latter a reflection of the current efforts to revise the University’s General Education Program).  The difficulties in establishing a standardized assessment program for CHPA were discussed with the following conclusions: There has been quite a range of different assessment measures and methods employed by the departments. For example, since there were no standardized exams or accrediting bodies for the Religious Studies and Philosophy programs, they relied on tracking forms filled out by faculty that indicated student strengths and weaknesses in their courses in the major, exit interviews, and a portfolio of written assignments.  Political Science and Sociology/Anthropology/Criminology have administered the MFAT for several years and used the results to help guide curricular revision.  Similarly, Economics has employed the standardized TUCE exam as well as exit interviews with their graduates to gauge the effectiveness of their curriculum.  History has two different assessment plans since the BSED program must fit within the DESE and NCATE accreditation process and the HST BA program and their two Masters programs rely on a combination of exit surveys for majors and final grades in individual courses.  What is clear from this is that a more systematic formal structure with rubrics tied to specific learning outcomes is needed for all of these plans.  While there is valuable data coming from these assessment methods, it is not easy to interpret and does not provide the departments with enough clear evidence to make curricular decisions. With new assessment programs now in place, the next tasks are to (1) make more effective use of the data collected and (2) document how that data was used to determine levels of student learning and as the basis for curricular or pedagogic changes (a summary for the year’s activities and the plans for each department are found at: http://www.missouristate.edu/assets/assessment/CHPADepartmentalAssessmentMethods-spring2012.pdf).

  1. Curricular Changes

During FY11 several Departments in CHPA conducted curricular assessments and made significant revisions to their curriculum.  In every case, the impetus for these efforts was to (1) bring the curriculum into line with disciplinary standards, and (2) to contribute to student success through a more focused set of courses.

  1. Changes in personnel caused ANT to eliminate several courses that were no longer offered and normalize some that had been offered as variable content courses.
  2. In response to national trends and in an effort to create a more seamless transfer pathway from OTC and other two-year schools, CRM totally restructured its undergraduate curriculum. This involved changing five 300-level classes to 200-level classes and the creation of several new courses that provided a better focus for the major and addressed the market place for their graduates.
  3. In response to a suggestion by their external reviewer, ECO created a new class (ECO 101) that provides instruction for non-majors in financial responsibility and basic economic principles.  The course will be submitted for inclusion in the new General Education curriculum in the coming year.
  4. History completed the restructuring of their undergraduate curriculum, placing greater emphasis on teaching writing and research skills and providing majors with new options toward graduation. They plan to revise the BSED curriculum during 2012.
  5. After eliminating the Public Administration major, PLS implemented a new undergraduate curriculum that reduces the number of free electives and requires majors to take PLS 169 as an introduction to the major.  Several 200-level courses are now required to ensure majors experience a fuller ranger of topics associated with the field of Political Science.
  6. In spring 2011 the REL department approved a substantial revision of the curriculum of the master's program, including lowering and simplifying the entrance requirements, lowering the total number of hours required for the degree, simplifying the curricular structure, and changing the comprehensive examination. These changes should draw more students into the program and reduce the time it takes for students to complete their degree.
  7. The new Public Sociology focus adopted by SOC was implemented during 2011.  New courses were added to the curriculum and others removed from the major to sharpen that focus.  Two new hires that will begin in fall 2013 will further strengthen the curriculum and build on it for the future.
  1. Enrollment Management Analysis
  1. Total SCH:
    Five years of total SCH in CHPA by calendar year demonstrate peaks and valleys in enrollment by lower division, upper division, and graduate courses.  The one constant, however, is a steady growth in overall SCH from 2007 to 2011 resulting in a 9.7% increase during that period.  While the College’s SCH continues to be heavily dependent on General Education offerings, there has also been an increase in majors, especially in CRM, during this period.

Calendar Year

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Course Level

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Lower Division

53,608

51,203

51,970

52,116

54,105

Upper Division

18,330

18,270

17,904

17,936

18,311

Graduate

2,833

3,314

4,135

5,072

4,634

Total

74,771

72,787

74,009

75,124

77,050

 

As always, there is a significant drop in SCH from the fall to the spring semester.  For example, enrollment in lower division courses in spring 2011 produced total SCH of 24,963 while lower division courses in fall 2011 produced 27,130 SCH.  Seasonal differences can be attributed to the number of December graduates, academic suspensions, transfer of students, and personal decisions not to continue in school.  Balancing the inevitable loss of students each semester are CHPA retention efforts, especially the additional of professional academic advisors in CRM, HST, and PLS.

  1. General Education:
    As has been the case for many years, CHPA is heavily dependent upon General Education course offerings.  As much as 62% of the college’s SCH comes from this source and therefore the coming revision of the GE program could have a truly significant impact on departments like HST, PHI, PLS, REL, and SOC.  CRM has no GE courses and ECO only has one, but ECO’s fortunes are closely tied to enrollment in COBA and there has been a drop in the enrollment in their two principles classes (ECO 155 and ECO 165) that reflects the fact that many students are now entering college with dual credit or have transfer credit for these courses. The chart below compares the census figures of fa10 and fa11 enrollment data.  Fluctuations from one year to the next are caused in part by the number of sections offered, but a 1.3% growth in SCH is a positive indicator that the college continues to attract students to its GE courses.

Course

Enroll–
 fa10C

Sections fall 10

Enroll – fa11C

Sections fall 11

%Enroll fa11/fa10

 

PHI 105

93

2

93

2

100%

AAS 100

251

5

253

5

100.8%

 

PHI 110

416

9

419

9

100.7%

ANT 100

260

6

299

7

115%

 

PHI 115

320

7

320

7

100%

ANT 125

70

2

71

2

101.4%

 

PLS 101

1476

24

1505

22

102%

ECO 155

757

12

741

12

97.9%

 

REL 100

657

15

609

14

92.7%

GST 170

41

1

42

1

102.4%

 

REL 101

187

5

165

5

88.2%

HST 103

219

5

300

8

137%

 

REL 102

144

4

152

4

105.5%

HST 104

266

6

316

7

118.8%

 

REL 131

204

5

191

5

93.6%

HST 121

602

12

672

12

111.6%

 

REL 210

205

4

185

4

90.2%

HST 122

645

14

646

15

100.1%

 

SOC 150

755

11

833

12

110.3%

 

 

 

 

 

Totals

 

CHPA

7568

149

7812

152

103.2%

 

  1. Graduate Programs:
    One concern for the College has been the inability to maintain steady growth in its graduate programs.  Particularly dramatic has been the significant drop between calendar year 2010 and 2011.  Some of that decline is attributable to a shift in emphasis in COBA that no longer requires ECO 600 and ECO 710 for their MBA students.  In other cases the drop is based on fewer graduate students being recruited into the college’s programs and that is being addressed with the appointment of new graduate directors in CRM, HST, the MPA program.  Only CRM and PLS have shown significant growth while REL and HST have remained relatively steady.  DSS has over the last five years shown strong growth (258 to 591 SCH), but because of the limitations of their facilities they will need to schedule more classes during the afternoon and adopt online modalities and ITV transmission of courses in order to maintain that growth curve.

Year

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Level

CHPA

Period

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Graduate

 

 

2,510

2,843

3,880

4,517

4,207

 

 

Spring 2007

1,184

0

0

0

0

 

 

Spring 2008

0

1,334

0

0

0

 

 

Spring 2009

0

0

1,501

0

0

 

 

Spring 2010

0

0

0

2,257

0

 

 

Spring 2011

0

0

0

0

2,149

 

 

Fall 2011

0

0

0

0

2,058

 

 

Fall 2007

1,326

0

0

0

0

 

 

Fall 2008

0

1,509

0

0

0

 

 

Fall 2009

0

0

2,379

0

0

 

 

Fall 2010

0

0

0

2,260

0

It is clear from the chart below that DSS and PLS have been the prime generators of graduate level SCH for the college.  Both the masters programs in Public Administration and Global Studies can handle a larger number of students, but that will require shifting more classes to online mode and more vigorous recruiting efforts. While cramped by their facilities, DSS has continued to grow and if they receive the National Defense University contract they can expect an additional 24 students per year in a steady cohort.  HST has shown some potential for modest growth depending on their ability to recruit larger numbers of students and develop more online classes. The programs in ANT and CRM are still fairly new and expectations are that they will continue to grow in the future.  REL has maintained a steady level for many years. More aggressive recruiting efforts can build their enrollments.

Year

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Level

Dept

College

Subject

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Credit Hours

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Grad

 

 

 

2,510

2,843

3,880

4,517

4,207

 

CRM

 

 

0

0

0

0

259

 

DSS

 

 

468

603

807

1,080

1,104

 

ECO

 

 

285

234

372

447

315

 

HST

 

 

404

469

545

694

647

 

PHI

 

 

0

0

0

3

0

 

PLS

 

 

947

907

1,245

1,155

1,164

 

REL

 

 

226

241

224

274

259

 

SAC

CHPA

 

180

389

687

864

459

 

 

 

ANT

0

48

174

291

222

 

 

 

CRM

177

251

513

570

237

 

 

 

SOC

3

90

0

3

0

 

2,510

2,843

3,880

4,517

4,207

 

Access:
CHPA has made an effort to increase accessibility through a number of measures including the redesign of departmental websites that are more intuitive and attractive to students and the introduction of a range of teaching modalities.  Although the vast majority of students are still enrolled in traditional seated classes during the day, there has been steady growth in the number enrolled in online and blended courses. That is evidenced both by the reduction of nearly 3,000 in the traditional enrollments over the period from 2007-2011 and the corresponding increase in online enrollments from 1,155 to 7,065 in the same period of time. 

                                                           CHPA SCH Growth in INET Courses

 

FY

FY

Fall

FY

FY

 

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

 

SCH

SCH

SCH

SCH

SCH

 CHPA

1,155

1.659

3,048

4,752

7,065

 

Unfortunately, the evening college has seen a significant drop (except in i-courses) by more than 3,000. That is due in part to an increased number of online courses (especially in CRM and the graduate programs) and an apparent drop in interest by students.  The College plans to work in the coming year with Joye Norris to gauge the need for more seated and blended evening course enrollments.

CY

CY 2007

CY 2008

CY 2009

CY 2010

CY 2011

Traditional

57,493

55,565

57,602

55,403

54,699

Off Campus

2,273

2,090

1,887

2,146

2,177

I-Courses

2,559

2,423

2,582

2,934

3,213

Intersession

1,220

1,419

1,002

1,421

1,094

Internet

1,155

1,659

3,048

4,752

7,065

Evening

8,284

8,301

6,240

5,982

5,091

Dual Credit

1,287

975

1,215

948

840

Blended

--

--

135

1,206

2,616


Growth has been the greatest for the college in on-line course offerings, from five in spring 2006 to twenty-nine in fall 2011. There has also been a corresponding growth in summer on-line classes (sum10 = 16; sum11 = 20; sum12 = 29). In addition, the efforts to place the entire undergraduate and graduate program in CRM online has moved ahead allowing them to offer multiple classes each semester and in the summer online.  Other Departments have developed online offerings, but none at this point are as far ahead as CRM.  One reflection of that growth has been the hiring of two Instructors to assist CRM with its course load in 2012-2013.

                                                Number of On-Line Sections offered by CHPA Departments

Dept

SP06

FA06

SP07

FA07

SP08

FA08

SP09

FA09

FA10

FA11

CRM

2

2

3

5

4

2

4

7

10

13

ECO

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

1

1

2

HST

1

2

1

3

4

3

2

4

4

5

PHI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

PLS

2

2

3

2

2

2

4

4

6

6

REL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

SOC

 

 

 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

TOTAL

5

7

7

12

11

9

11

17

22

29

 

  1. Majors and Graduation Statistics and Analysis

During the course of the past five years, the number of undergraduate majors has slowly but steadily risen.  One factor has been the emergence of CRM as a very popular major, growing from 300 majors in fall 2007 to 493 in fall 2011, a 64.3% increase.  However, with its decoupling from the SOC/ANT Department, the number of SOC majors has dipped from 160 in fall 2007 to 66 in fall 2011 (a 69% decrease).  While efforts are being made by the SOC faculty to refocus their major on “Public Sociology,” it can be expected that it will take several years for them to significantly increase the number of their majors.  Three other programs are worth noting: (1) ANT has seen an 18.3% increase from 115 to 136 majors, and (2) PHI increased from 33 to 37 majors (a 12.1% increase) and REL increased from 62 to 67 majors (an 8% increase) due in large part to their creation of a BS degree option. No other departments have seen positive changes and in fact most have remained statistically flat or slightly down over this same period.

Period

Fall 2007       

Fall 2008       

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

% Change

CHPA

Program

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

from fa07

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

to fa11

 

 

1,251

1,221

1,283

1,358

1,364

 

 

ANTH-BA

35

43

44

46

54

 

 

ANTH-BS

80

68

68

70

82

+18.3%

 

CRIM-BS-NONC

0

0

0

2

0

 

 

CRMC-BA

18

3

6

9

0

 

 

CRMC-BS

282

92

39

11

0

 

 

CRMN-BA

0

17

27

36

38

 

 

CRMN-BS

0

199

307

371

455

+64.3%

 

ECOC-BS

19

24

27

21

24

 

 

ECON-BA

7

14

5

6

6

 

 

ECON-BS

36

25

32

40

30

-3.2%

 

HIST-BA

138

107

119

133

135

 

 

HSTE-BSED

192

192

189

202

190

-1.5%

 

IDHI-BA

0

0

0

1

1

 

 

IDRE-BS

0

0

0

1

0

 

 

IDSO-BS

0

0

0

2

0

 

 

PHIL-BA

25

25

26

24

15

 

 

PHIL-BS

8

16

13

19

22

+12.1%

 

POLC-BS

49

33

38

17

4

 

 

POLI-BA

46

50

54

56

36

 

 

POLN-BS

83

96

97

130

137

 

 

PUMG-BA

3

4

5

1

0

 

 

PUMG-BS

8

8

6

3

2

-5.3%

 

REST-BA

62

65

61

39

33

 

 

REST-BS

0

0

9

28

34

+8%

 

SOCI-BA

12

13

5

9

15

 

 

SOCI-BA-PRE

0

0

4

6

0

 

 

SOCI-BS

148

127

75

56

48

 

 

SOCI-BS-PRE

0

0

27

19

3

-69%

Total by COLUMNS

1,251

1,221

1,283

1,358

1,364

 

 

As a measure of undergraduate student success, CHPA has graduated a range of 312 (FY08) to 262 (FY07) with an average over the five year period of 294.  Only PHI temporarily has fallen below the 10/year average during this period, while the largest number of graduates by far is in CRM, averaging 87 each fiscal year.  As a result of this success, and to meet the needs of the increasing number of majors in CRM, the unit became its own Department in fall 2011, hired a Department Head and an additional senior professor and one other senior professor was assigned to the unit as a result of reorganization of another unit.

FY

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

FY2010

FY2011

5-Year

Level

DEPT

Program

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Avg.

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Grad

UG

 

 

262

312

299

302

297

294

 

ECO

 

13

23

17

22

20

19

 

HST

 

47

66

54

58

52

55

 

PHI

 

5

8

10

8

10

8.2

 

PLS

 

41

33

43

33

38

37.6

 

REL

 

16

15

11

21

18

16.2

 

SOC/ANT

 

140

167

164

160

159

 

 

 

ANTH-BA

8

6

8

9

11

 

 

 

ANTH-BS

9

22

23

19

13

25.6

 

 

CRMC-BA

1

1

1

1

0

 

 

 

CRMC-BS

74

78

61

22

2

 

 

 

CRMN-BA

0

0

0

0

4

 

 

 

CRMN-BS

0

0

20

67

93

87

 

 

IDSO-BS

0

0

0

0

2

 

 

 

SOAA-BA

1

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

SOCI-BA

4

4

3

2

2

47

 

 

SOCI-BS

43

56

48

40

32

 

Total by COLUMNS

262

312

299

302

297

294

 

The number of graduate students in each program has been addressed above.  The chart below provides data on the number of graduates from each program.  Except for the new programs in ANT and CRM, which lack five years of data, all of the programs in CHPA easily exceed the necessary graduation success rate of 5/year.  Of course, the number of graduates fluctuates from year to year depending on the backlog of students who finally complete their theses after exceeding the normal two year period of instruction.

FY

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

FY2010

FY2011

Average

Level

DEPT

Program

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Headcount

Number

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Of Grads

GR

 

 

58

53

72

88

95

73.2

 

DSS

 

16

12

23

32

26

21.8

 

HST

 

11

8

14

5

23

12.2

 

 

HIST-MA

10

7

13

5

21

 

 

 

SEHI-MSED

1

1

0

0

2

 

 

 

SESS-MSED

0

0

1

0

0

 

 

PLS

 

25

26

19

33

18

24.2

 

 

GLBS-MGS

16

18

8

4

8

 

 

 

IAAD-MIAA

0

0

0

12

5

 

 

 

PUBA-MPA

2

1

2

1

0

 

 

 

PUMG-MPA

7

7

9

16

5

 

 

REL

 

6

7

9

5

9

7.2

 

ANT/CRM

 

0

0

7

13

19

 

 

 

APAN-MS

0

0

0

0

2

2

 

 

CRIM-MS

0

0

7

8

8

7.7

 

 

HSAD-GRCT

0

0

0

5

9

7

 

Minors are another factor in the success of Departments.  They contribute an interesting mix to the discussion in upper division courses and in some cases they become majors.  The chart below tracks minors in CHPA over a three-semester period.  As might be expected, CRM has the most growth in numbers of new minors, while the rest of the departments have maintained their numbers. The minor in Public Administration was eliminated in fall 2011 as part of the curricular revision in PLS.

Number of Minors in CHPA Departments/Programs

CHPA Depts/ Programs

Spring 2011

Fall 2011

Spring 2012

ANT

37

39

31

CRM

74

92

105

ECO

77

73

75

HST

102

106

114

PHI

38

31

37

PLS

41

55

50

Public Admin

8

4

2

Public Law

11

14

17

REL

86

111

106

SOC

142

139

140

 

  1. Faculty Productivity
  1. Delaware Study Analysis:

    An examination of the Delaware Statistics for CHPA indicates that all of the Departments in the College are making efficient use of their faculty and are being productive. With an emphasis on timely completion of the degree, no Department uses Graduate Assistants to teach their own course section.  Some Departments, like PHI, PLS, and ECO use very few per course faculty, while others like CRM, HST, and REL are more dependent on per course faculty to teach multiple sections of required or General Education courses.  The number of Instructors also fluctuates based on such factors as sabbaticals or unpaid leaves and retirement of faculty. In some cases the College has hired Instructors to fill the gap temporarily in order to insure continuity of instruction in courses in the major and in General Education.  In some instances, however, Instructors have been added to departments on an ongoing basis in order to maintain the necessary number of General Education or required courses.  While preference is given to hiring regular, tenure-track faculty whenever possible, budgetary concerns have resulted in some cases in the hiring of a lower-cost Instructor instead.  To be sure that does put a strain on faculty advising, service load, and support of graduate programs, and therefore it is an option that is exercised judiciously.

CHPA

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Area

Delaware Faculty Group

MSU SCH/ DEL SCH

MSU SCH/ DEL SCH

MSU SCH/ DEL SCH

MSU SCH/ DEL SCH

MSU SCH/ DEL SCH

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

CRM

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

128.83

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

118.27

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

169.23

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

e) All Faculty Combined

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

129.24

ECO

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

191.05

116.67

105.84

85.71

84.09

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

146.93

119.07

117.37

124.15

127.12

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

0.00

159.14

0.00

115.79

0.00

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

e) All Faculty Combined

180.67

125.31

116.06

104.85

106.67

HST

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

125.39

109.13

120.61

102.67

114.12

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

131.44

103.75

136.50

0.00

91.00

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

161.46

153.35

127.93

139.36

195.74

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

e) All Faculty Combined

121.77

107.29

119.66

110.69

114.48

PHI

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

132.16

128.40

138.55

154.96

152.67

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

133.93

0.00

0.00

0.00

117.32

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

139.94

295.31

145.53

261.45

212.85

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

e) All Faculty Combined

130.45

128.62

134.95

160.55

148.79

PLS

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

108.44

102.90

107.42

114.06

132.03

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

182.91

138.84

172.22

204.76

160.32

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

188.55

201.80

272.73

173.33

131.52

 

d) Graduate Assistants

133.80

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

e) All Faculty Combined

132.81

117.18

128.62

129.37

139.78

REL

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

128.18

121.22

164.10

134.36

131.28

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

106.94

99.03

157.19

151.99

172.48

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

125.89

116.94

135.27

146.91

117.82

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

e) All Faculty Combined

137.80

129.78

159.01

144.59

149.55

ANT

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

125.58

117.93

80.07

82.03

83.33

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

0.00

0.00

34.15

0.00

100.45

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

114.53

190.20

152.85

135.50

302.44

 

d) Graduate Assistants

119.70

0.00

89.72

0.00

0.00

 

e) All Faculty Combined

112.00

109.61

68.97

86.49

89.37

CRM

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

78.95

82.08

80.18

118.47

0.00

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

117.58

140.80

123.56

98.32

0.00

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

70.69

77.63

0.00

139.16

0.00

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

e) All Faculty Combined

104.71

102.01

116.25

120.58

0.00

SOC

a) Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty

176.92

117.06

123.64

126.91

129.82

 

b) Other Regular Faculty

0.00

250.78

0.00

0.00

201.52

 

c) Supplemental Faculty

173.64

246.81

273.70

342.86

514.29

 

d) Graduate Assistants

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

e) All Faculty Combined

162.89

178.49

138.01

152.40

170.21

 

  1. Scholarly Activity:
    Based on faculty reporting of their activities during 2011 in Digital Measures, CHPA had a very good year.  This can be attributed to projects completed during sabbatical leaves, the hiring of new faculty who are working toward promotion and tenure, and an active research agenda on the part of the majority of faculty in the College.  Scholarly production by newly hired tenure-track faculty is generally at acceptable levels.  Department mentors are employed to assist probationary faculty to improve their teaching and expand their research activities.  Faculty members are encouraged to attend advisement workshops, the fall and spring Showcase presentations, and workshops on promotion and tenure sponsored by the Dean’s office.  Second year probationary faculty are asked to present their current research in the CHPA Research forum.

Year

Journal Articles

Book Chapters

Books

Papers Read

2007

35

17

11

125

2008

32

17

7

116

2009

27

17

10

109

2010

35

27

5

127

2011

56

13

13

152

 

Research activities of particular note include:

  • Bethany Walker (HST) – Fellow (sp 2012-fa 2012) Annemarie-Schimmel-Research College, Bonn, Germany with research focused on “History and Society during the Mamluk Era (1250-1517)”
  • Stephen Berkwitz (REL) – Fellow (fa 2011-sp 2012) Ruhr-University Bochum with research focused on Portuguese representations of Buddhism
  • Julia Watts Belser (REL) – Fellow (fa 2011-sp 2012) Harvard Divinity School with research focused on women in religion
  • Brooks Blevins (HST) -- Arkansiana Nonfiction Award, Arkansas Library Association
  • Scholarly monographs published:
    • Leslie Baynes (REL), The Heavenly Book Motif in Judeo-Christian Apocalypses 200 BCE-200 CE (Leiden: Brill, 2011).
    • Brian Calfano (PLS), Muslims and American Attachment: Religion, Identity, and Scrutiny in Post September 11th America (London: Ashgate, 2011).
    • John Chuchiak (HST), The Inquisition in New Spain, 1536-1819: A Documentary History, Ediciones Nueva España Series (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011).
    • Bethany Walker (HST), Jordan in the Late Middle Ages: Transformation of the Mamluk Frontier. Chicago: Middle East Documentation Center, University of Chicago, 2011).
  1. Teaching:
    The quality of instruction in CHPA has always been one of our strengths.  Innovations such as online and blended teaching have been readily adopted by many of our faculty, several have made good use of the services and workshops provided by the FCTL, and the Blackboard teaching software has become a standard that assists both instructors and students with course management.  Internships, service-learning experiences, and field schools provide students with real world training and have contributed to a better understanding of the university’s Public Affairs mission, their specific academic studies, and job preparation.  One means of assessing the success of our teaching is found in nationally normed tests used by several of the departments (MFAT, TUCE, LSAT) and the acceptance rate of our undergraduate and graduate students into law schools, medical schools, and doctoral programs in their disciplinary area.  For example, 15-20% of PLS graduates have been admitted into law school.

    Among the College’s efforts to provide as rich an educational program as possible has been the research forums developed by various departments as well as the College.  During 2011, these forums provided students the opportunity to present the results of their research (oral presentation and poster presentation) and to showcase their faculty mentors.  These included the CHPA Research Forum (undergraduate and graduate participants), Anthropology Research Forum (open to both undergraduates and grad students), and the Philosophy Research Forum.  Students were also assisted (financially and through mentoring) in making presentations at regional meetings in all of our disciplinary areas.

    CHPA faculty who were recognized for their outstanding efforts in the area of teaching include:

    -- Eric Nelson (HST) – Foundation Award for Teaching and the Governor’s Award for Teaching

    -- Brett Garland
    (CRM) -- Master Online Course Recognition Award (Overall in Four Categories)
  2. Service
    Faculty service activities take a variety of forms.  Of course, there is an expectation that faculty share the advisement, service and governance load in the Department and accept election or nomination to College or University committees.  Some also function as advisers for student organizations.  In addition, and as an expression of the Public Affairs mission, a number of faculty members also serve on community boards, perform as pro bono consultants, serve as officers of disciplinary organizations, and perform editorial duties for journals and book series in their field.

    Among the faculty recognized for their outstanding service activities in 2011 are:

-- Dennis Hickey (PLS) -- Foundation Award for Excellence in Service

-- Kevin Pybas (PLS) -- Outstanding Organization Advisor Award

-- Patti Salinas (CRM) --
Center for Community Engagement Recognition (Participation in Kids Voting)

-- Ivy Yarckow-Brown (CRM) --
Curtis P. Lawrence Award for Academic Advising

Space considerations present the citation of all of the activities by our faculty and students during 2011, but many have also been recorded in the CHPA Newsletter published on-line each semester:

spring 2011 -- http://www.missouristate.edu/chpa/110375.htm

fall 2011 -- http://www.missouristate.edu/chpa/123874.htm