Learning Outcomes and Assessment Methods

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Information adapted from the Stanford’s learning assessment and evaluation website

www.stanford.edu/dept/pres-provost/irds/assessment/assessment.html

Defining student Learning outcomes

http://www.stanford.edu/dept/pres-provost/irds/assessment/downloads/CLO.pdf

  • Learning outcomes should be specific and well-defined
  • Learning outcomes should be realistic
  • Learning outcomes should rely on active verbs in the future tense
  • Learning outcomes should be framed in terms of the program instead of specific classes that the program offers
  • There should be a sufficient number of learning outcomes
  • Learning outcomes should align with the program’s curriculum
  • Learning outcomes should be simple and not compound
  • Learning outcomes should focus on learning products and not the learning process

Constructing learning outcomes

  • Taxonomies of educational objectives attempt to divide learning into three areas (cognitive, affective, and behavioral).  Levels of performance required by the student for each domain are then defined and assessed through the use of rubrics.
  • Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives is one traditional framework commonly used.

Example of learning outcomes

  • Students will be able to communicate both orally and verbally about music of all genres and styles in a clear and articulate manner (comprehension).
  • Students will be able to analyze and interpret texts within a written context (analysis).
  • Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of core knowledge in biochemistry and molecular biology (application).
  • Students will be able to judge the reasonableness of obtained solutions (evaluation).
  • Students will be able to evaluate theory and critique research within the discipline (evaluation).
  • Students will be able to work in groups and be part of an effective team (synthesis).

Curriculum Map

  • Curriculum maps are used to see how the learning outcomes identified and developed are met within the program.
  • “I” (Introduce), “R” (Reinforce), and “E” (Emphasize).

 

Download Learning Outcomes PDF document

Download Depth of Knowledge Levels Chart document in PDF format

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ASSESSMENT MEASURES

Information adapted from the Stanford’s learning assessment and evaluation website

www.stanford.edu/dept/pres-provost/irds/assessment/assessment.html

Selecting Assessment Measures

http://www.stanford.edu/dept/pres-provost/irds/assessment/downloads/AM.pdf

  • Direct vs Indirect Measures of Assessment 
    • Direct measures require students to represent, produce or demonstrate their learning.
    • Indirect measures capture information about students’ perceptions about their learning experiences and attitudes toward the learning processes.  Validated assessments of indirect measures of learning exist and can be provided by the FCTL.
    • Many accrediting agencies now require that direct measures be used as primary evidence in the assessment of student learning.
    • Indirect measures may serve as supporting evidence, but the focus should be on direct measures first.

Examples of Direct and Indirect Measures and Assessment Methods: see handouts.

Download Assessment Measures PDF document
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Download Assessment Measures Checklist PDF document
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 Download Assessment Measures Checklist Word document
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